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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That cave development is the inception of cave development in carbonate rocks begins if water can move through the bedrock and commence dissolution. the earliest water movement may be due to mechanisms (including ground-water pumping and ionic diffusion effects) unrelated to those dominating later development. similarly, inception may include physical and chemical dissolution (involving removal of carbonates and mineral impurities by water and by strong acids), as well as by the carbonic acid dissolution that dominates later cave growth. initial water movement can be along primary pores in the rock (in coarse raffle limestones, oolites or chalk), along relatively thin non-carbonate beds within the succession, or along incipient or open fissures (joints, faults and bedding planes). these potential water routes are initially very narrow and water movement is severely restricted and laminar, allowing only very slow dissolutional growth (see gestation), until enlargement beyond the turbulent threshold (breakthrough) permits faster flow and accelerated cave growth. after establishment of turbulent flow conditions the effects of dissolution are augmented by mechanical abrasion and collapse, which expose new rock. during the early development stages a network of narrow openings is formed. subsequently, geological factors guide the preferential expansion of favorable routes, which capture more of the local flow and enlarge, at the expense of less favorable openings, to form caves. the less favorable fissures are relegated to a subordinate role in transmitting percolation water or, more rarely, in carrying elements of overflow water during floods. also during the early stages, all voids are water filled but as permeability increases and true hydraulic flow conditions are established, the upper voids drain freely, forming a water table. almost all caves therefore originate under phreatic conditions but the overall passage morphology is modified during later growth into vadose or phreatic caves, enlarged from the original phreatic imprint, above or below the water table. ultimately, cave development evolves towards efficient drainage close to the water table. passage enlargement then becomes regressive as collapse increases. the stage of a cavernous karst collapsing extensively is relatively rarely achieved, being overtaken at high latitudes and high altitudes by surface lowering, but such collapse can contribute to the chaotic land forms of tropical karst [9].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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Prof.dr. sc. Mladen Garasic is Speleogenesis member

PhD Geology Prof.dr. sc. Mladen Garasic (Croatia)

Contact by email Contact by email
Address: Nova Ves 66, HR-10000 Zagreb Croatia
Website: www.grad.unizg.hr
Affiliation: University of Zagreb,
Faculty of Civil Engineering,
Department of Geotecnics and Geology,

Croatian Speleological Federation
Position: Univ.Full Prof. of Applied Geol.; Karst Hydrogeol.; Speleology; Eng.Geol.; president of Croat.Spel.Fed.(1991-2010), delegate UIS (1993-today) and FSE
Specialization: Hydrogeology
Instrumentation: All speleological and karst hydrogeological instruments and methods. Geophysical instruments, 3D measuring, photography, rock mechanics instruments, underwater ROW camera, radon concentration instruments, radiation instruments, atmospheric instrumentation and measurements, carotage instruments, bore hole etc.
Geoactivity: Croatian Dinaric karst region and all of the World, /4969 caves in 63 countries in 49 years of activity/
Interests: Speleological research, Speleogenesis, Neotectonics, Karst Hydrogeology, Cave diving, the longest and the deepest caves in Croatia, the longest and the deepest syphons in Croatia, Engineering Geology in karst areas,
Member of Speleogenesis.info since 2007-08-26