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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That NAPL is abbreviation for nonaqueous phase liquid. this term is used to describe the physico- chemical that exist between a bulk hydrocarbon and water which results in the two liquids being immiscible with one another (i.e. little or no mixing of the two liquids occurs.) the interface is a physical dividing surface between the bulk phases of the two liquids. napls are divided into two categories; lnapls and dnapls. see also dnapl; immiscible; lnapl.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

NSS
Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, 2000, Vol 62, Issue 3, p. 163-168
Effect of Trail Users at a Maternity Roost of Rafinesque's Big-Eared Bats
Abstract:
While bat-roosting sites continue to be targets of vandalism, Hood Branch Rock Shelter in Natural Bridge State Park, Kentucky, provides habitat for Corynorhinus rafinesquii (Rafinesques big-eared bat). The shelter lies immediately adjacent to a hiking trail (Upper Loop Trail); therefore, the bats are potentially subject to disturbance by park visitors. This study monitored the behavior patterns of park visitors using the trail for potential disturbance effects at the shelter, and compared these data to population size and activity patterns of C. rafinesquii inhabiting the shelter from March to September 1998. Data indicate that a bypass trail directed many visitors away from the entrance to the shelter, but some visitors used the trail adjacent to the shelter and exhibited behavior potentially disruptive to the bats. The shelter was occupied by a maternity colony of Corynorhinus rafinesquii from late April to mid-July, a period in which access to the shelter was restricted due to debris and washouts along the trail from a severe storm in winter 1998. However, the shelter was abandoned by the bats within two weeks after the trail was cleared of debris. Although cause and effect cannot be directly inferred from collected data, the likelihood that the bats abandoned the shelter because of human intrusion is strong. The suitability of this shelter as a maternity roost of C. rafinesquii may be jeopardized by park visitors hiking the adjacent trail, suggesting closure of the Upper Loop Trail as the most viable option for protecting C. rafinesquii in Hood Branch Rock Shelter