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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That mud crack is desiccation cracks appearing in drying mud surfaces due to shrinkage [16].?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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NSS
Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, 2000, Vol 62, Issue 2, p. 135-143
Lechuguilla Cave Pool Chemistry, 1986-1999
Abstract:
In May 1986, cavers dug into Lechuguilla Cave, in southeastern New Mexico, USA. Subsequent exploration and research have demonstrated that Lechuguilla is a world-class cave, both in size and in speleological importance. Of particular interest to hydrologists and geochemists are the numerous isolated pools throughout much of the cave. Since 1986, close to 200 water samples have been collected and subjected to over 2000 individual analyses. Results of these analyses are collected and published here for the first time.

Dominant cations in the pool waters are calcium and magnesium; dominant anions are bicarbonate and sulfate. These characteristics reflect the limestone/dolomite host bedrock of the cave, modified to varying degrees by the caves massive gypsum deposits, associated with the caves early development. The overall chemistry of the water can be explained by a small number of geochemical processes, starting with evaporation and concentration of local rainfall, and dissolution of soil CO2 and local bedrock. Within the cave, excess CO2 is degassed, leading to precipitation of CaCO3 and increased Mg2+:Ca2+ ratios. In some areas of the cave, infiltrating water encounters and dissolves gypsum, leading to increased CaCO3 precipitation and increased SO42-:HCO3- ratios. In at least one location, massive evaporation has created a magnesium sulfate brine. Geochemical characteristics seem to confirm that the pool located at Lechuguillas current deep point is actually the regional aquifer, suggesting that the caves maximum air-filled depth has been reached.