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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That phreas, phreatic water is (from the greek word meaning well.) 1. the zone of saturated rock below the water table, within which all conduits and subconduits are water filled (sometimes referred to as the flooded, phreatic or saturated zone). commonly the phreatic zone is considered as being subdivided into an upper (shallow phreatic) zone and a lower stagnant phreatic zone [9]. 2. water in the zone of saturation; water below the water table [10]. see also bathyphreatic, bathyphreatic zone, ground water, phreas.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

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ISS-UIS
International Journal of Speleology, 1981, Vol 11, Issue 0, p. 21-0
Investigations of the Troglobitic Crayfish Orconectes inermis testii (Hay) in Mayfield's Cave, Monroe County, Indiana.
Abstract:
Mark-recapture studies of some aspects of the biology of the cavernicolous crayfish, Orconectes inermis testii (Hay), were conducted from December, 1969 to March, 1970, in Mayfield's Cave, Monroe County, Indiana. Population size was estimated to be 66 +/- 9 (95% C.L.) for the 300 m study area, but because of the small sample size, this is undoubtedly a deflated value. Size of animals, expressed as total length, indicates that the population was comprised primarily of adults. Seventy-four percent of the marked crayfish moved no more than 10.5 m away (total upstream and downstream distances) from the tagging site. Hence, this species appears to restrict its activities to a specific area ("home range") of up to 10.5 m of stream passage. Form I males travelled greater distances than did Form II (15.1 and 3.0 m, respectively), possibly in search of mates. Adult females moved less than juveniles, and males appeared to move greater distances than females (means of 12.9 and 5.9 m, respectively). Upstream movements were more commonly observed than downstream (mainly Form I males), indicating a possible restocking mechanism following floods. Distances travelled were not rebated to the size of individuals or to elapsed time.


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