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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That glade is 1. (jamaican.) an elongate depression, having steep sides, in which a generally flat floor is divided into small basins separated by low divides. 2. (tennessee.) limestone pavement having extensive growth of cedar trees [10]. see also uvala.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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RESEARCH JOURNALS, MONTREAL RD, OTTAWA, ONTARIO K1A 0R6, CANADA
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 2004, Vol 41, Issue 12, p. 1411-1423
Seasonal isotopic imprint in moonmilk from Caverne de l'Ours (Quebec, Canada): implications for climatic reconstruction
Abstract:
Moonmilk, which is often seen coating walls in temperate caves, is a porous secondary calcite deposit composed of an aggregate of microcrystalline calcite and water. This study, based on moonmilk deposits found in Caverne de l'Ours, Ottawa Valley region, proposes a model for its formation based on the calcite and water isotope chemistry and evaluates its use as a climatic proxy. In Caverne de l'Ours, non-calcitic mineral inclusions protrude from the bedrock (Grenville marble) into the moonmilk, while others are entirely enclosed within the moonmilk. This observation suggests a mechanism of bedrock dissolution and reprecipitation for the formation of moonmilk, which is controlled by the changing seasonal climate in the cave. The delta(18)O of the moonmilk interstial water indicates that the condensation of water vapour occurs mostly in winter and spring. The condensation of water vapour on the surface of the walls allows for the dissolution of the Grenville marble and releases ions necessary for the precipitation of moonmilk. The delta(18)O and delta(13)C of calcite and delta(18)O of the moonmilk interstitial water indicate that precipitation of moonmilk occurs during summer and fall. During these seasons, the relative humidity in the cave decreases resulting in moonmilk growth through the slow evaporation of calcite-saturated water. A comparison of the delta(18)O record of moonmilk from caves in Gaspesie (Canada) and from Aven d'Orgnac (France) shows that this material retains temperature information valuable for paleoclimatic reconstructions