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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That interstitial medium is spaces between grains of sand or fine gravel filled with water which contains phreatobia [25].?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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VIADUKSTRASSE 40-44, PO BOX 133, CH-4010 BASEL, SWITZERLAND
Eclogae Geologicae Helvetiae, 2000, Vol 93, Issue 0, p. 93-101
The catchment of the Brassus karst spring (Swiss Jura): a synthesis of the tracer tests
Abstract:
Two successive tracer tests were carried out in the Pleine Lune cave which is located in the central part of the Brassus karstic spring catchment area (South-western Jura, Switzerland). During both experiments, the tracers were not recovered neither. at the Brassus spring nor at the secondary springs. Following this amazing result, the available data on this spring have been studied and a synthesis is proposed in this paper. The Brassus karstic spring, situated in the south-western part of Vallee de Joux, is an important resurgence from this part of the folded Jura. The water emerges from Cretaceous limestones covered by a thin layer of moraine: the main alimentation comes however from the underlying Maim limestone aquifer, Cretaceous limestones bring only a limited part of the total discharge. Within the supposed Brassus spring catchment areal 18 tracer tests were realised, but only half of them gave positive results. Positive tracer rests show low velocities and poor restitution percentage, particularly during low water periods. Such peculiarities are attributed to an important saturated zone, favouring dilution and dispersion of the tracers. The average discharge at the: spring is assumed to be less than 500 l/s and the average specific discharge is about 40 l/s/km(2), following previous data on other springs of the area. A calculated catchment area with such values would have a surface of 13,5 km(2); but the catchment area derived from the topography of the base of the Maim aquifer (top of the argovian marls considered as an aquitard) covers 56 km(2). This important difference as well as the negative results obtained from the Pleine Lune cave tracer tests show how difficult it is to define a catchment area for limestone aquifers: on one hand a delimitation based on water balance calculations tends to underestimate the catchment area by neglecting outlets as direct infiltration in the alluviums and secondary springs. On the other hand a delimitation based on geological considerations seems to overestimate the surface; this is illustrated by negative tracer tests results with injection points situated well inside the catchment area