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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That leakance is 1. the ratio k'/b', in which k' and b' are the vertical hydraulic conductivity and the thickness, respectively, of the confining beds [22]. 2. the rate of flow across a unit (horizontal) area of a semipervious layer into (or out of) an aquifer under one unit of head difference across this layer. synonymous with coefficient of leakage [22].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
Engineering challenges in Karst, Stevanović, Zoran; Milanović, Petar
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy), Dimuccio, L.A.; Rodrigues, N.; Larocca, F.; Pratas, J.; Amado, A.M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.A.
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

2001
Application of morphometric relationships to active flow networks within the Mammouth Cave Watershed, MSc Thesis.
Abstract:

Numerous quantitative relationships have been formulated to describe the nature of surface-drainage networks. These parameters have been used in various studies of geomorphology and surface-water hydrology, such as flood characteristics, sediment yield, and evolution of basin morphology. Little progress has been made in applying these quantitative descriptors to karst flow systems due to the lack of sufficiently complete data and inadequate technology for processing the large, complex data sets. However, as a result of four decades of investigation, an abundance of data now exists for the Mammoth Cave Watershed providing the opportunity for broader quantitative research in the organization of a large, highly-developed, karst-drainage network. Developing Geographic Information System (GIS) technology has provided tools to 1) book-keep the karst system's large, complex spatial data sets, 2) analyze and quantitatively model karst processes, and 3) visualize spatially and temporally complex data. []Karst aquifers display drainage characteristics that in many ways appear similar to surface networks. The purpose of my research was to explore techniques by which quantitative methods of drainage-network analysis can be applied to the organization and flow patterns in the Turnhole Bend Groundwater Basin of the Mammoth Cave Watershed. []Morphometric analysis of mapped active base-flow, stream-drainage density within the Turnhole Bend Groundwater Basin resulted in values ranging from 0.24 km/km2 to 1.13 km/km2. A nearby, climatologically similar, nonkarst surface drainage system yielded a drainage density value of 1.36 km/km2. Since the mapped cave streams necessarily represent only a fraction of the total of underground streams within the study area, the actual subsurface values are likely to be much higher. A potential upper limit on perennial drainage density for the Turnhole Bend Groundwater Basin was calculated by making the assumption that each sinkhole drains at least one first-order stream. Using Anhert and Williams’ (1998) average of 74 sinkholes per km2 for the Turnhole Bend Groundwater Basin, the minimum flow-length draining one km2 is 6.25-7.22 km (stated as drainage density, 6.25-7.22 km/km2). []Stream ordering of cave streams and their catchments generally follow Hortonian relationships observed for surface-stream networks. Subsurface streams within the Mammoth Cave Watershed generally exhibit a converging, dendritic pattern and possess drainage basins proportionately large for their order. However, even at base-flow conditions, the Turnhole Bend drainage system continues to possess confounding characteristics. These include at least one leakage to an adjacent groundwater basin (Meiman et al., 2001), diverging streams sharing the same surface catchment (Glennon and Groves, 1997), and highly complex, three-dimensional basin boundaries (Meiman et al., 2001). In spite of the incomplete data set available for the Mammoth Cave Watershed, study of initial values suggests an orderly subsurface flow network with numerical results that allow for comparison of the karst-flow network to surface fluvial systems.