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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That coquina is porous limestone composed of broken shell fragments [16].?

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Karst environment, Culver D.C.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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Your search for affinities (Keyword) returned 24 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 24
On a new subspecies of Niphargus jovanovici Karaman (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridae) of Dijon, France., 1968, Graf Franois, Straskraba Milan
The new subspecies, Niphargus jovanovici burgundus n.subsp., is described from a well at Dijon, France. The principal diagnostic characters are given and a comparison with other known subspecies of N. jovanovici is made. Two groups of subspecies in N. jovanovici are distinguished and some critical remarks on probable affinities of N. jovanovici with other species of Niphargus are made.

On a new subspecies of Niphargus jovanovici Karaman (Crustacea, Amphipoda, Gammaridae) of Dijon, France., 1968, Graf Franois, Straskraba Milan
The new subspecies, Niphargus jovanovici burgundus n.subsp., is described from a well at Dijon, France. The principal diagnostic characters are given and a comparison with other known subspecies of N. jovanovici is made. Two groups of subspecies in N. jovanovici are distinguished and some critical remarks on probable affinities of N. jovanovici with other species of Niphargus are made.

Trichoniscoides saeroeensis Lohmander, an Isopod Crustacean new to the British fauna., 1971, Sheppard Edith M.
The terrestial isopod Trichoniscoides saeroeensis Lohmander, new to the British fauna, is recorded fram the dark zone of disused mines in Lancashire; the paper includes notes on its systematic position and certain morphological characters as well as its affinities. The origin and geographical distribution of the species, together with that of the other two species recorded in England [T. albidus (Budde-Lund) and T. sarsi Patience], is discussed.

Trichoniscoides saeroeensis Lohmander, an Isopod Crustacean new to the British fauna., 1971, Sheppard Edith M.
The terrestial isopod Trichoniscoides saeroeensis Lohmander, new to the British fauna, is recorded fram the dark zone of disused mines in Lancashire; the paper includes notes on its systematic position and certain morphological characters as well as its affinities. The origin and geographical distribution of the species, together with that of the other two species recorded in England [T. albidus (Budde-Lund) and T. sarsi Patience], is discussed.

A new species of Parajapygidae from the Caribbean shores of Cuba collected by Pr. L. Botosaneanu during the second cuban-romanian biospeleological expedition to Cuba 1973., 1975, Pages Jean.
P. (P.) botosaneanui n.sp. has been collected in the interstitial habitat of the Caribbean shores on the eastern coast of Cuba. This note is divided into 6 parts: 1) the description by L. Botusaneanu of the stations where this species has been collected and data on the possibility for the specimens of this taxa to swim and to creep between the grains of sand; 2) the description and the affinities of the n. sp., which is closely related to bonetianus Silv. from Mexico; 3) the study of the male genitalia made possible the definition of 4 instars (male 1 to male 4) which seem common to all the Parajapyx; 4) the study of the 9 genitalia, which possess always the same number of phanera, whatever the size may be, does not permit the identification of instars; 5) the study of the armature of the internal margin of the cerci shows for the first time among the Parajapygidae a striking dimorphismus both between the sexless and sexed instars and between male and female, these latter retaining, when "adult", an ornamentation identical to that of juvenil males: 6) the study of evolution and progressive complication of the chetotaxy from the sexless instars to the elder ones.

Investigations on the Entocytheridae Ostracods. Data on Sphaeromicola cebennica juberthiei nov. ssp. and Sphaeromicola cirolanae Rioja., 1977, Danielopol Dan L.
Sphaeromicola cebennica juberthiei n. ssp., a cavernicolous ostracod found in the South of France (Systme de Cent Fons and Avencas, Herault), is described here. The new subspecies differs from Sph. cebennica cebennica (found in a cave from Ardche) by the smaller carapace and a reduced distal bristle on the 'finger" of the male copulatory organ. The affinities and differences between the European Sphaeromicola and Sph. cirolanae from Mexico are discussed. The genus Sphaeromicola is divided into two groups of species: the group topsenti and the group cirolanae. Some observations on the mating process of Sph. Cebennica juberthiei are presented. A precocious sexual behaviour of the female in the last post-embryonic instar is recorded. This type of behaviour seems to be a characteristic of the Entocytheridae.

Polydesmide et Craspedosomides cavernicoles nouveaux de France et du Maroc (Myriapoda; Diplopoda)., 1985, Mauris Jean Paul
This is a description of the affinities and biogeographic significance of three new cavernicolous species of Diplopoda from France and Morocco. One species apparently belongs to the Polydesmida (family Paradoxosomidae) and the other two to Craspedosomida (families Caratosphydae and Chordeumidae). 1) Eviulisoma abadi n.sp. is distinguished from other species of this genus by total depigmentation, by the characters of the gonopodial orifice and the male gonopods, by the low number of segments (19) and by its geographic isolation (Morocco) and ecology (Kef Aziza cave). This justifies the establishment of a new sub-genus, Jeekelosoma. The other species of this genus are found in equatorial Africa and the east. E. abadi is the first paleoarctic species of this genus and is the second paleoarctic species of the tribe Eviulisomidi after Boreviulisoma liouvillei Brol.). It is also the first known from a cave. Like the two other known species of Paradoxosomidae known from the southwest of the paleoarctic zone, Boreviulisoma liouvillei Brol. and Oranmorpha guerinii (Gerv.) the new species is indicative of originating in the Ethiopian region at a time when the Sahara was not a barren desert. 2) Ceratosphys maroccana n.sp. from Gouffre Friouato (Morocco) probably is not an epigean troglophile; it is the southernmost species of this genus which is normally found in France and Spain. This is apparently a remnant of a small group of species from the south of Spain that constitute a sub-genus Proceratosphys Mau. and Vincente. 3) Orthochordeumella leclerci n.sp. (caves of Ardche, France) manifest the presence unique in this genus of cavernicolous characters including depigmentation and extreme length of antennae and is the only truly troglobitic species of this genus. Other characters are less distinctive but it is possible to distinguish this species by sexual characteristics from other species, notably that from the neighbouring geographic area, O. cebennica (known only from the Ardche region) which is troglophilic. The other three species are found in epigean forest habitats, one in the Pyrenees, the other two in the Tyrol, the Swiss Jura, Baden and the northeast of France and Belgium.

IMPLICATIONS OF A PALEOMAGNETIC STUDY OF THE SILICA NAPPE, SLOVAKIA, 1991, Marton P. , Rozloznik L. , Sasvari T. ,
The Silica nappe (s.l.) of the Inner West Carpathians consists of an essentially non-metamorphic, platform-type sedimentary complex of Mesozoic (chiefly Triassic) age. Palaeomagnetic samples were collected from 16 sites throughout the southern and northern Gemeric parts of this unit and from one site of the Mesozoic Meliata series which underlies the Silica nappe (s.s.) in south Gemer. The samples from each site were treated using thermal demagnetization and well-grouped magnetic directions of individual components were found for 13 (14) sites. Detailed analysis of the directional data showed (a) post-folding magnetization for four late Triassic-Jurassic sites in the eastern Slovak Karst, (b) synfolding magnetization for five sites in the western Slovak Karst with a direction corresponding to local palaeomagnetic data of African affinity for the late Cretaceous and (c) primary magnetizations in the northern Gemeric area for only two rock units with a declination difference which implies a relative rotation between these units. As all secondary remanences are of normal polarity it is very likely that their acquisition is related to the emplacement of the Silica nappe during the early late Cretaceous. The dominant remagnetization mechanism probably is CRM but occasional contributions of TVRM are also conceivable

Searching for extinction/recovery gradients: the Frasnian-Famennian interval, Mokra Section, Moravia, central Europe, 1996, Cejchan P, Hladil J,
A series of ancient seafloors colonized by diverse organisms has been documented from the Upper Devonian rocks of the Western Mokra Quarry. Situated in the southern tectonic closure of the Moravian Karst, the Frasnian-Famennian shallow carbonate ramps exhibit both Rhenish and Ukrainian affinities. Reconstruction of palaeo-sea floor horizons results in a series of 28 quadrats sufficient for further evaluation. Eighty-five taxa involved were scrutinized for abundance, occupied area, skeletal mass production and biomass production. The aim of the study was to determine whether the observed sequence of quadrats can be distinguished from a random one, and to discover any possible unidimensional gradient as a latent control. Monte Carlo simulations and a graph theoretical approach were utilized. Although the raw data seemed chaotic, the simulations demonstrated the observed sequence is not random. A significant influence of a hidden control is thus suggested. Fifteen characteristics of quadrats (e.g. diversity, number of taxa, vertical stratification of community, number of patches) were utilized for final interpretation. The gradient reconstructed by TSP algorithm reveals a significant crisis within the uppermost part of the Amphipora-bearing limestone

Morphological affinities of the proximal ulna from Klasies River main site: Archaic or modern?, 1996, Churchill Se, Pearson Om, Grine Fe, Trinkaus E, Holliday Tw,
The Middle Stone Age (MSA) asociated hominids from Klasies River Mouth (KRM) have taken on a key role in debate about the origins of modern humans, with their craniofacial remains seen as either representing the earliest well-dated modern humans in southern Africa or orthognathic late archaic humans. Diagnostic postcranial remains from Klasies are few, but one specimen-a proximal right ulna from the lower SAS member-is useful For assessing the morphological affinities of these hominids. Canonical variates analysis using 14 proximal ulnar dimensions and comparative data from European, west Asian and African archaic humans, and Levantine Mousterian, European Upper Paleolithic, African Epipaleolithic and diverse recent modern human samples (many of recent African descent) were employed to assess the morphological affinities of this specimen. Results suggest an archaic total morphological pattern for the Klasies ulna. Analysis of diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry reveals an ulnar shaft with relatively thick cortical bone, but the specimen cannot be readily distinguished from Neandertals or early anatomically modem humans on the basis of shaft cross-sectional properties. If the isolated ulna from Klasies is indicative of the general postcranial morphology of these hominids, then the MSA-associated humans from KRM may not be as modern as has been claimed from the craniofacial material. It ii: possible also that the skeletal material from KRM reflects mosaic evolution-retention of archaic postcranial characteristics. perhaps indicating retention of archaic habitual behavior patterns, in hominids that were becoming craniofacially modern. (C) 1996 Academic Press Limited

Terrestrial hot-spring Co-rich Mn mineralization in the Pliocene-Quaternary Calatrava Region (central Spain), 1997, Crespo A, Lunar R,
Central Spain hosts a series of high-Co (up to 1.7% Co) Mn mineralizations displaying a variety of morphologies: spring aprons and feeders, pisolitic beds, wad beds and tufa-like replacements of plants and plant debris. The Mn mineralogy consist of cryptomelane, lithiophorite, birnessite and todorokite. The spring apron deposits formed in close proximity to Pliocene volcanic rocks (alkaline basaltic lava flows and pyroclastics) belonging to the so-called Calatrava Volcanic Field. The spring aprons are found along or near to normal faults bounding small basins and topographic highs. Mn tufa-like deposits are found near to the spring sources, while both pisolitic and wad beds are clearly distal facies occuring well within the Pliocene basins. The two latter are interbedded with clastic lacustrine and fluvial sediments. Collectively, these deposits contain a complex suite of Mn-(Co) mineralization ranging from proximal, hot-spring-type Mn facies, grading into more distant sedimentary, stratabound mineralization. Volcanism, basin formation and Mn deposition took place within a failed rift environment which triggered hydrothermal activity and Mn-(Co) deposition as proximal (near to the volcanic axes) and distal (of sedimentary affinities, within the basins) facies

Paleomagnetic study of Triassic sediments from the Silica Nappe in the Slovak Karst, a new approach, 1998, Kruczyk J. , Kadzialkohofmokl M. , Tunyi I. , Pagac P. , Mello J. ,
Intensive paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study were performed for Triassic limestones from the Silica Nappe in the Slovak Karst. Five exposures situated on the eastern and western side of the Stitnik-Plesivec fault were sampled for this study. In all exposures a secondary component of remanence of normal polarity (N), carried by secondary PSD magnetite was found. In the Silicka Brezova exposure (SE) apart from the N component, another secondary component of reversed polarity (R), carried by hematite; was isolated. Both components were acquired after folding. The R component was acquired during the Odra reversal event in the Oligocene (Birkenmajer et al. 1977). Comparison of its direction with the reference data let us conclude that the area belonged during this time to the African affinity. The declination of the R component suggests that after this magnetization period the studied region rotated anticlockwise by about 90 degrees around an intraplate vertical axis together with the whole Pelso megaunit. According to Marton et al. (1995) and Marton & Fodor (1995) the rotation took place in two phases, the first one by about 50 degrees took place in the Early Miocene, the second one, by about 30 degrees - in the Late Miocene. The N component, isolated by us, seems to have been acquired during the Middle Miocene after the first and before the second rotational phases: its declination agrees with a counterclockwise rotation of the Silica Nappe by about 30-40 degrees during the Late Miocene, as postulated by the cited authors. The inclination of the N component is lower, than the expected for Miocene, but agrees with the Miocene results for the Bukk region also belonging to the Pelso block, confirming the idea about the Miocene 'southern escape' of the Pelso block (Marton 1993). The final tectonic activity in the study area was connected with formation of the Stitnik-Plesivec fault (Late Tertiary-Quaternary). Our results suggest, that the fault is of rotational type and resulted in different tilting of beds situated on its eastern and western sides

A modern human humerus from the early Aurignacian of Vogelherdhohle (Stetten, Germany), 2000, Churchill Se, Smith Fh,
Implicit in much of the discussion of the cultural and population biological dynamics of modern human origins in Europe is the assumption that the Aurignacian, from its very start, was made by fully modern humans. The veracity of this assumption has been challenged in recent years by the association of Neandertal skeletal remains with a possibly Aurignacian assemblage at Vindija Cave (Croatia) and the association of Neandertals with distinctly Upper Paleolithic (but non-Aurignacian) assemblages at Arcysur-Cure and St. Cesaire (France). Ideally we need human fossil material that can be confidently assigned to the early Aurignacian to resolve this issue, yet in reality there is a paucity of well-provenanced human fossils from early Upper Paleolithic contexts. One specimen, a right humerus from the site of Vogelherd (Germany), has been argued, based on its size, robusticity, and muscularity, to possibly represent a Neandertal in an Aurignacian context. The morphological affinities of the Vogelherd humerus were explored by univariate and multivariate comparisons of humeral epiphyseal and diaphyseal shape and strength measures relative to humeri of Neandertals and Early Upper Paleolithic (later Aurignacian and Gravettian) modern humans. On the basis of diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry, deltoid tuberosity morphology, and distal epiphyseal morphology, the specimen falls clearly and consistently with European early modern humans and not with Neandertals. Along with the other Vogelherd human remains, the Vogelherd humerus represents an unequivocal association between the Aurignacian and modern human morphology in Europe. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc

The role of evaporites in the genesis of base metal sulphide mineralisation in the Northern Platform of the Pan-African Damara Belt, Namibia: geochemical and fluid inclusion evidence from carbonate wa, 2000, Chetty D, Frimmel He,
The Otavi Mountain Land is a base metal sulphide ore province in northern Namibia where deposits are hosted by platform carbonates of the Otavi Group in a foreland fold-and-thrust belt on the northern edge of the Pan-African Damara Belt. Deposits have been classified as the Berg Aukas- or Tsumeb-types, based on differences in ore association? stratigraphic position and geochemistry of ores and gangue carbonates. Mineralisation at these deposits is accompanied by carbonate alteration in the form of dolomite and calcite veins, carbonate recrystallisation, calcitisation and carbonate silicification. Based on cathodoluminescence imaging, trace and rare earth element (REE), O and C isotope, and fluid inclusion data, a series of carbonate generations, constituting wall rock alteration around the Tsumeb and Kombat (Tsumeb-type) and Berg Aukas (Berg Aukas-type) deposits, was established. Similar data obtained on the recently discovered Khusib Springs deposit indicate a strong affinity to Tsumeb-type deposits. Tsumeb-type deposits are distinguished from Berg Aukas-type deposits by having trace element and REE concentrations that are significantly higher in the alteration products compared to the carbonate host rocks. Only around Tsumeb-type deposits a relative enrichment in light REE is noted for the hydrothermal carbonate generations that are cogenetic with the main stage of mineralisation. Microthermometric results from fluid inclusions in carbonate alteration phases and associated quartz indicate relatively high salinity (17-33 wt% NaCl equivalent) for the main mineralising and subsequent sulphide remobilisation stages at the deposits investigated. Estimated mineralisation temperatures are significantly higher for Tsumeb-type deposits (370-405 degrees C) with early sulphide remobilisation in Tsumeb at 275 degrees C, whereas they are lower at Berg Aukas (up to 255 degrees C). Fluid inclusion leachate analysis suggests that most of the observed salinity can be ascribed to dissolved, predominantly Ca- and Mg-carbonates and chlorides with subordinate NaCl. Na-Cl-Br leachate systematics indicate a derivation of the fluid salinity from the interaction with evaporitic rocks en route. Tsumeb-type mineralisation is interpreted to be derived from fluids expelled during Pan-African orogeny in the more intensely deformed internal zones of the Damara Belt further south. When the high salinity fluids reached the carbonate platform after having scavenged high concentrations of base metals, base metal sulphide precipitation occurred in zones of high porosity, provided by karst features in the carbonate sequence. Results obtained for the Berg Aukas-type deposits emphasise their derivation from basinal brines, similar to Mississippi Valley-type deposits, and confirm that mineralisation of the Berg Aukas- and Tsumeb-types are both spatially and temporally distinct

The History of Christmas Island and the Management of its Karst Features, 2001, Meek, Paul D.

Christmas Island is an external Territory of Australia with a history pre-dating that of mainland Australia. It hosts a diverse range of endemic and native terrestrial, subterranean and aquatic flora and fauna with Australian, Indo-Malesian and Pacific affinities. The Island has survived the impacts experienced on other tropical islands as a result of human settlement and is a highly valued ecological asset to Australia. The karst environment has been under-valued as an ecological entity until recently when extensive speleological surveys were conducted. These surveys were a part of broader attempts to prepare a management plan to conserve the values of the karst environment.


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