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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That conduit permeability is sometimes referred to as cavernous permeability, this is a measure of the efficiency with which a particular aquifer transmits water through conduits (see permeability) [9].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

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Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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Your search for africa (Keyword) returned 143 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 143
The `human revolution' in lowland tropical Southeast Asia: the antiquity and behavior of anatomically modern humans at Niah Cave (Sarawak, Borneo), , Barker G, Barton H, Bird M, Daly P, Datan I, Dykes A, Farr L, Gilbertson D, Harrisson B, Hunt C,
Recent research in Europe, Africa, and Southeast Asia suggests that we can no longer assume a direct and exclusive link between anatomically modern humans and behavioral modernity (the `human revolution'), and assume that the presence of either one implies the presence of the other: discussions of the emergence of cultural complexity have to proceed with greater scrutiny of the evidence on a site-by-site basis to establish secure associations between the archaeology present there and the hominins who created it. This paper presents one such case study: Niah Cave in Sarawak on the island of Borneo, famous for the discovery in 1958 in the West Mouth of the Great Cave of a modern human skull, the `Deep Skull,' controversially associated with radiocarbon dates of ca. 40,000 years before the present. A new chronostratigraphy has been developed through a re-investigation of the lithostratigraphy left by the earlier excavations, AMS-dating using three different comparative pre-treatments including ABOX of charcoal, and U-series using the Diffusion-Absorption model applied to fragments of bones from the Deep Skull itself. Stratigraphic reasons for earlier uncertainties about the antiquity of the skull are examined, and it is shown not to be an `intrusive' artifact. It was probably excavated from fluvial-pond-desiccation deposits that accumulated episodically in a shallow basin immediately behind the cave entrance lip, in a climate that ranged from times of comparative aridity with complete desiccation, to episodes of greater surface wetness, changes attributed to regional climatic fluctuations. Vegetation outside the cave varied significantly over time, including wet lowland forest, montane forest, savannah, and grassland. The new dates and the lithostratigraphy relate the Deep Skull to evidence of episodes of human activity that range in date from ca. 46,000 to ca. 34,000 years ago. Initial investigations of sediment scorching, pollen, palynomorphs, phytoliths, plant macrofossils, and starch grains recovered from existing exposures, and of vertebrates from the current and the earlier excavations, suggest that human foraging during these times was marked by habitat-tailored hunting technologies, the collection and processing of toxic plants for consumption, and, perhaps, the use of fire at some forest-edges. The Niah evidence demonstrates the sophisticated nature of the subsistence behavior developed by modern humans to exploit the tropical environments that they encountered in Southeast Asia, including rainforest

The Cango Caves, Cape Colony [South Africa], 1948, Mountain E. D.

Contribution to the systematics of African Stenasellinae (Asellote Crustaceans)., 1966, Magniez Guy
From 1897 to 1962, many species have been described as belonging to the genus Stenasellus Dollfus. Among all these the forms from Central Africa and one of Western Africa are not conform to the generic description of Racovitza 1924 obliging us to institute two new genera, Metastenasellus and Parastenasellus. The archaeic Asellota belong to the genus Stenasellus Dollfus, Johannella Monod, Metastenasellus nov.gen. and Parastenasellus nov. gen. are thus grouped in a sub family of Stenasellinae and the relationship between the different groups has still to be explained.

A new African species of the genus Stenasellus (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota) of the Niger basin., 1972, Birstein Jakov Avadievich
The representatives of the genus Stenasellus (sensu lato) in Africa have been previously known from Cote d'lvoire, bassin of the Congo and Somali. The new species of this genus was collected from the well in the town Sicascau (Mali). This species differs from all others in the structure of the carpopodites of pereopods II-IV which are enlarged and armed with multiple curved spines. This character shows a distinct sexual dimorphism. In all other features St. laticarpus sp.n. belongs to the group of St. gjorgjevici Rac. and shows the closest resemblance to St. africanus Monod. It is now preferable to conserve the unity of the genus Stenasellus (sensu lato). The validity of the African endemic genera Metastenasellus Magniez, Parastenasellus Magniez and Magniezia Lanza needs to be confirmed.

Concerning Stenasellus laticarpus Birstein (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1972, Magniez Guy
The species Stenasellus laticarpus Birstein is closely related to three west-African Stenasellidae, forming the genus Magniezia Lanza. It belongs to the same genus: Stenasellus laticarpus = Magniezia laticarpa (Birstein).

A new African species of the genus Stenasellus (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota) of the Niger basin., 1972, Birstein Jakov Avadievich
The representatives of the genus Stenasellus (sensu lato) in Africa have been previously known from Cote d'lvoire, bassin of the Congo and Somali. The new species of this genus was collected from the well in the town Sicascau (Mali). This species differs from all others in the structure of the carpopodites of pereopods II-IV which are enlarged and armed with multiple curved spines. This character shows a distinct sexual dimorphism. In all other features St. laticarpus sp.n. belongs to the group of St. gjorgjevici Rac. and shows the closest resemblance to St. africanus Monod. It is now preferable to conserve the unity of the genus Stenasellus (sensu lato). The validity of the African endemic genera Metastenasellus Magniez, Parastenasellus Magniez and Magniezia Lanza needs to be confirmed.

Concerning Stenasellus laticarpus Birstein (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1972, Magniez Guy
The species Stenasellus laticarpus Birstein is closely related to three west-African Stenasellidae, forming the genus Magniezia Lanza. It belongs to the same genus: Stenasellus laticarpus = Magniezia laticarpa (Birstein).

Some aspects of the Magnesium Problem in Karst Weathering with special reference to the North-east Transvaal, South Africa, 1973, Marker M. E.

Caves of the East African Rift Valley, 1973, Sutcliffe A. J.

Caves of the Strydpoort Mountains, Northeastern Transvaal, South Africa, 1974, Marker Margaret E.

Ecological and Faunistic Data on the Stenasellidae (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota of Subterranean Waters)., 1974, Magniez Guy
Some important morphological features, which are discussed here, point out that the Stenasellids (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota) must be considered as a true family (Stenasellidae), independent from the Asellidae. A definition and a renewed diagnosis of the Stenasellidae Dudich, 1924, are given. Their relationships must be pursued, especially in the marine Parastenetroidea and in the psammic Microcerberidae. Until 1938, the group was known only from subterranean waters of southern Europe. Now, several genera and many thermophile species from north-tropical underground waters have been discovered in Africa (5 gen., 12 sp.), Asia (1 gen., 2 sp.) and Central America (1 gen., 4 sp.). The Stenasellids are very active burrowers. Such a behaviour explains how their phyletic lines had colonized the continental underground waters, by migrations from the littoral gravels to the underflow of rivers, phreatic alluvial waters and fnally, to the karstic waters. The typical medium for the life of the group is represented by the phreatic zones of African shields arenas. In European phyletic lines, the speciation seems to be linked with tertiary subsidences (within the Tyrrhenian area, for the line of Stenasellus virei). The European species which have survived quaternary glaciations may have diversified themselves (rising of subspecies), recolonizing newly vacant biotopes in postglacial ages.

Lethargy in the cavernicolous Chiroptera in Central Africa., 1976, De Faveaux Michel Anciaux
From his personal research undertaken in the subterranean field (natural and artificial cavities) in Shaba (ex-Katanga, in S.E. Zaire) and Rwanda, the author briefly defines the macroclimate of the prospected regions as well as the microclimate of the subterranean habitat (humidity and temperature). A reversible hypothermia has been noticed in the dry season only (from May till August) in eleven species of troglophile Chiroptera belonging to the following families: Rhinolophidae (7 species of Rhinolophus), Hipposideridae (only Hipposideros ruber) and Vespertilionidae (Miniopterus inflatus rufus, Miniopterus schreibersi arenarius & M.s. natalensis, Myotis tricolor). No sign of lethargy has been noticed in the Megachiroptera (Lissonycteris angolensis, Rousettus aegyptiacus leachi), Emballonuridae (Taphozous perforatus sudani), Hipposideridae (Cloeotis percivali australis) or Nycteridae (3 species of Nycteris). There could be correlations between lethargy and breeding if one takes into account the phenomena of late ovulation and delayed implantation. The entry into lethargy is not caused by the scarcity of food. It does not concern all the individuals of a colony or in various populations of a cave. The degree of humidity appears to be more important than the temperature as far as the conditions for hibernation are concerned.

The karst of Transvaal (South Africa)., 1976, Kavalieris I. , Martini Jacques E. J.
The Transvaal Karst is a world important example of a Karst developed on a very old dolomite. Its unique character is due to the composition of the rock and history of development. The dissolution of the dolomite is interesting and has an important effect on the character of the caves developed. The caves preserved in this area include the longest known in South Africa and are perhaps among the largest dolomite systems known in the world. They are very old and in some cases contain important palaeontological deposits (Australopithecine fauna). The caves to various degrees are in a state of de-generation, having been exposed for a very long period above the water-table. For the greater part of the Karst area, aggressive vadose waters, and long exposure has resulted in the accumulation of a thick covering of residual material. The plateau-like geomorphology and low rainfalls has prevented physical erosion and significant removal of this debris from the land surface. The caves themselves are often characterized by collapse and in general lack of formations. Massive calcite formation in the caves is usually partly or nearly completely redissolved and are relics of past colder climatic periods with winter rains. Formations active now are small, usually delicate and often due directly to evaporation. The heavy mantle of residual debris preserved under some of the more ancient of South African landsurface relics (the African Surface) poses a serious economic problem of stability, with mans' utilization of the environment. A greater understanding of the Karst, its evolution and properties is thus of considerable practical importance.

Critical evaluation of recent work on the systematics of subterranean Crustacea (with description of two new genera of Parabathynellidae, Bathynellacea)., 1976, Schminke Horst Kurt
This paper reviews critically some recent work on the systematics of subterranean Crustacea, in particular Jakobi's work on the Parastenocarididae (Copepoda), Serban's work on the Bathynellidae (Bathynellacea, Syncarida) and Schminke's revision of the Parabathynellidae (Bathynellacea, Syncarida). Is is pointed out that three different approaches have been adopted in each of the three cases and advantages and shortcomings of each of them are analysed. Finally descriptions are given of two new genera of Parabathynellidae, Afrobathynella gen. n. and Nunubathynella gen. n., from a locality near Port Elisabeth (South Africa).

Flow of fossil groundwater, 1977, Bourdon Dj,
The great groundwater basins of North Africa and Arabia extend over an area of some 6.5 million square kilometres. Gradients on the isopiezometric surfaces of their confined ground-waters are generally interpreted as indicating present-day flow of groundwater. Can such flow occur in basins where most or all of the groundwater is fossil and where effective infiltration and recharge may have ceased some 10 000 years ago? Assuming that there is indeed no current recharge in these arid and sem-arid regions, the paper identifies seven groups totalling 12 possible mechanisms which can contribute in varying degrees to maintaining flow of groundwater long after effective recharge has ceased. These are: (i) Residual heads; (ii) Tilting of basin; (iii) Compaction effects, in terms of sediment loading, basalt loading and water loading/unloading; (iv) Thermal drive; (v) Gas drive; (vi) Lowering of discharge level, by tectonic displacement, by pressure bursts and by collapse of cover; and (vii) Evaporation in the discharge zone, such as lowering of lake levels and evaporation from sabkhas. Nine additional mechanisms were considered but rejected. Combinations of these mechanisms can produce heads inducing flow of fossil groundwater, but appear to be insufficient to account for present hydraulic regimes without some current surface recharge. The findings have direct application to studies leading to the development, use and management of these major water resources of the arid zones of the Sahara and Arabia

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