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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That rate of draft is the rate at which water is required for use (demand) [16].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for biospeleology (Keyword) returned 89 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 89
The birth of Biospeleology., 1964, Motas Constantin
Modern biospeleology dates from May 15, 1907, with the publication of Racovitza's "Essai sur les problmes biospologiques." In this paper he posed; if he did not answer; every question raised by life in the subterranean world. He outlined a program of biospeological research, made an analysis of the conditions of existence in the subterranean domain and their influence upon cavernicoles, discussed the evolution of subterranean biota, their geographical distribution, etc. Racovitza modified Schiner's (1854) classification, dividing cavernicoles into troglobites, troglophiles and trogloxenes, terms later adopted by a great number of biospeologists. The "Essai", called "Racovitza's famous manifest" by Vandel, was considered the birth certificate of biospeology by Antipa (1927) and by Jeannel (1948), its fundamental statute. Jeannel also made major contributions to the young science through his extensive and detailed studies. The names of Racovitza and Jeannel will always be linked as the uncontested masters of biospeology, the founders of Biospeologica, and the authors of Enumration des grottes visites. Apart from Schiner, whose ecological classification of cavernicoles was utilized and modified by Racovitza, they had another forerunner in Vir, a passionate speleologist who often accompanied Martel in his subterranean explorations, once meeting with a serious accident in which he was on the brink of death. Vir (1897, 1899) studied subterranean faunas, establishing the world's first underground laboratory, where he carried on unsuccessful or ill-interpreted experiments. We consider Racovitza and Jeannel's criticism of him too severe. Let us be more lenient with our forerunners, since their mistakes have also contributed to the progress of science, as well as exempting us from repeating them.

Biospeleology, 1964, Barr Tc,

The invertebrate fauna of tropical American caves, Part III: Jamaica, an introduction., 1975, Peck Stewart B.
The scattered literature on the physical speleology and biospeleology of the West Indian island of Jamaica is brought together. As a result of recent field work, a summary of the Jamaican vertebrate and invertebrate caves is given. The invertebrate fauna is known to include some 150 free-living macroscopic species. These are mostly troglophilic scavengers and predators associated with guano accumulations. However, some 25 species, mostly terrestrial and undescribed, are known to be troglobites. This is one of the largest known assemblages of tropical troglobites. Brief descriptions are given for the 54 cave sites which have been biologically studied.

Karst geomorphology and biospeleology at Vanishing Falls, South-West Tasmania, 1992, Eberhard Rolan , Eberhard Stefan , Wong Vera

A speleological expedition to Vanishing Falls explored a 2.3km long cave associated with the underground course of the Salisbury River, and provided the first systematic documentation of karst features and cave ecology in this remote area. The caves host a fauna comprising at least 30 taxa, of which probably more than 14 are troglobitic or stygobiontic. This fauna exhibits a high degree of troglomorphy, with some species likely to be endemic to the Vanishing Falls karst.


A contribution to history of Biokovo cave exploration, 2001, Jalž, Ić, B.

Subterranean Fauna of Christmas Island, Indian Ocean, 2001, Humphreys W. F. , Eberhard Stefan

The subterranean environment of Christmas Island is diverse and includes freshwater, marine, anchialine, and terrestrial habitats. The cave fauna comprises swiftlets, and a diverse assemblage of invertebrates, both terrestrial and aquatic, which includes a number of rare and endemic species of high conservation signicance. At least twelve species are probably restricted to subterranean habitats and are endemic to Christmas Island. Previously poorly known, the cave fauna of Christmas Island is a signicant component of the island's biodiversity, and a signicant cave fauna province in an international context. The cave fauna and habitats are sensitive to disturbance from a number of threatening processes, including pollution, deforestation, mining, feral species and human visitors.


Faune aquatique souterraine de France : base de donnes et elments de biogographie, 2003, Ferreira David, Doleolivier Mariejos, Malard Florian, Deharveng Louis, Gibert Janine
SUBTERRANEAN AQUATIC FAUNA OF FRANCE: DATABASE AND BIOGEOGRAPHY - Many data exist on the aquatic subterranean fauna of France but they are scattered. Thus, large-scale patterns of ground water biodiversity are still poorly documented due mainly to the lack of synthesis. Since 2002, we are currently gathering existing information on the distribution of stygobite species in France. A first inventory is presented in this paper. The present database contains 381 species and subspecies corresponding to more than 5700 records. This diversity indicates that the stygobite fauna of France is among one of the richest ground water fauna in Europe. Our current knowledge of groundwater biodiversity varies markedly among zoological groups and regions. We are currently implementing the present data set in order to provide a distribution pattern as complete as possible of stygobite richness in France. The database will be used for delineating hot spots of biodiversity (specific richness, endemism), for identifying priority areas for conservation and for formulating and testing hypotheses on the origin and drivers of groundwater biodiversity.

Interstitial Habitats (Aquatic), 2004, Albuquerque E. F. , Coineau N.

Biofilms, 2004, Boston R.

Crustacea: Copepoda, 2004, Brancelj A.

Africa, Sub-Saharan, 2004, Brook G. A.

Amphibia: Proteus, 2004, Bulog B.

Adaptation: Morphological (External), 2004, Christiansen K.

Crustacea: Isopoda (Aquatic), 2004, Coineau N. , Butin C.

Crustacea: Syncarida, 2004, Coineau N. , Camacho A. I.

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