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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That hibbenite is a cave mineral - zn7(po4)4(oh)2.7h2o [11].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
Engineering challenges in Karst, Stevanović, Zoran; Milanović, Petar
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy), Dimuccio, L.A.; Rodrigues, N.; Larocca, F.; Pratas, J.; Amado, A.M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.A.
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

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Your search for cave climate (Keyword) returned 21 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 21
An Investigation of the Mechanisms of Calcium Carbonate Precipitation on Straw Speleothems in Selected Karst Caves - Buchan, Victoria., 1988, Canning, E.

The relative significance of straw speleothem growth from evaporation and from CO2 degassing was determined in Lilli-Pilli and Moons Caves (Buchan, Victoria) from a seven-month study of cave climate and water chemistry. The relative importance of these two mechanisms was inferred from the calculation of the straw growth rates according to a degassing model and an evaporation model. The modelled straw growth rates from the carbon dioxide degassing model were on hundred to one thousand times those attributable to evaporation. A third model was used to calculate straw growth rates from the overall supersaturation of the water. Growth rates were found to be within the range of 0.01 to 0.07mm per annum.


An Investigation of the Climate, Carbon Dioxide and Dust in Jenolan Caves, N.S.W., PhD Thesis, 1997, Michie, Neville

Pressure of use of Jenolan Caves as a tourist spectacle has raised concerns about the wellbeing of the caves, so three related physical subjects were reviewed and investigated; the cave microclimate, the carbon dioxide in the cave atmosphere and dustfall in the caves. The microclimate has been shown to be dominated by several physical processes: in the absence of air movement, conduction and radiation dominate; in association with air movement, convective coupled heat and mass transfer tends to dominate energy flows. A new approach using boundary conditions and qualitative characteristics of transient fronts enables accurate measurement and analysis of energy, heat and mass transfer. This technique avoids the dimensionless number and transfer coefficient methods and is not geometrically sensitive. Conditions in caves are also determined by the capillary processes of water in cave walls. Air movement in caves depends on surface weather conditions and special problems of surface weather observation arise. A series of experiments were undertaken to evaluate the cave and surface processes. The physical processes that collect, transport and release dust were measured and described. Dust in the caves was shown to be carried from the surface, mainly by visitors. The concept of the Personal Dust Ooud is developed and experimental measurements and analysis show that this process is a major threat to the caves. New techniques of measurement are described. An accurate physiological model has been developed which predicts most of the carbon dioxide measured in Jenolan Caves, derived mainly from visitors on the cave tours. This model, developed from previously published human physiological information also predicts the production of heat and water vapour by cave tourists. The effects of carbon dioxide on cave conditions has been investigated. Details of a two year program of measurements in the caves are given. The generalised approach and methods are applicable to other caves, mines and buildings.


Field assessment of the microclimatology of tropical flank margin caves, 2000, Gamble Dw, Dogwiler Jt, Mylroie J,
Temperature observations were collected inside 2 caves in the Bahamas and 1 cave in Puerto Rico to characterize the microclimatology of tropical flank margin cave systems. Three aspects of these tropical cave temperatures agree with temperate cave microclimate theory. Specifically, external atmospheric disturbances can affect temperatures inside tropical flank margin cave systems, tropical flank margin caves are warmer than the exterior temperatures during winter, and water can impact temperatures deep into a tropical flank margin cave system. The temperature observations collected also indicate potential differences between the microclimatology of tropical and temperate cave systems. In particular, the temperate 3-zone cave microclimate model may not be applicable to tropical flank margin caves, diurnal fluctuations were not apparent in tropical flank margin cave systems, and the existence of a temperature inversion in a down-sloping cave may not be applicable to all tropical flank margin caves. The potential differences in temperate and these tropical cave systems can be linked to the physical dimensions of the tropical flank margin cave systems and the unique hydrology of small carbonate islands. Specifically, tropical flank margin caves have a width greater than length while temperate fluvio-karst caves have a length greater than width and tidal water can exist in the pits and depressions of tropical flank margin caves as opposed to flowing streams in temperate cave systems

Un nouveau ''-1000'' dans un karst englace: le gouffre Feichtner (Kitzsteinhorn, Salzburg, Autriche). Genese de la plus profonde cavite karstique du monde en roche non calcaire., 2001, Audra Ph.
The Kitzsteinhorn (3208 m) in the Central Alps of Salzburg, Austria, is a partly glaciated karst area with two deep caves recently surveyed. Both the "Zeferethohle" (-560 m) as well as the "Feichtner-Schachthohle" (-1024 m) are developing in mica-bearing calcschists. Observations on the genesis, hydrology, sedimentology and the cave climate are discussed.

Feichtner cave (Kitzsteinhorn, Salzburg, Austria), A deep cave system developing into calcareous schists in a glacial environment, 2001, Audra, Philippe

The Kitzsteinhorn (3208 m) in the Central Alps of Salzburg, Austria, is a partly glaciated karst area with two deep caves recently surveyed. Both the "Zeferethöhle" (-560 m) as well as the "Feichtner-Schachthöhle" (-1024 m) are developing in micaceous calcareous schists. Observations on the genesis, hydrology, sedimentology and the cave climate are discussed.


MODERN TREND IN CAVE MONITORING, 2002, Cigna, Arrigo A.

The evolution of cave monitoring since 19th century is described. The advantage of the development of theories was the possibility to obtain comparable results and forecast the evolution of a cave climate before irreversible modifications take place. The most important parameters to be monitored are indicated. In recent years both important technological improvements have been obtained and the relative importance of each parameter has been reviewed. Kartchner Caverns, Arizona, USA, was opened to the public in November 1999. Some preliminary studies have been performed. Arizona Conservation Project, Inc. (ACPI) established 22 monitoring stations. An evaluation of the impact assessment was obtained. The second case concerns Cango Cave. A simple monitoring network has been installed in September 2000 to be operated for one year. It consists in about 15 rugged data loggers distributed along the cave. Air and water temperature, carbon dioxide concentration, and relative humidity are measured and the values are transferred periodically by a shuttle into a computer outside the cave. A totally automatic monitoring network will be installed in the future after the results of the first simple network are achieved.


Detection of an airflow system in Niedzwiedzia (Bear) Cave, Kletno, Poland, 2003, Pflitsch, A. , Piasecki, J.
Analyses of radon gas tracer measurements and observation of the variability of thermal structures have long been thought to indicate the presence of weak air currents in Niedzwiedzia (Bear) Cave, Kletno, Poland. However, only after ultrasonic anemometers were installed could different circulation systems of varying origin and the expected air movements be observed by direct measurement. This paper presents: a) the different methods applied in order to determine the weakest air currents both directly and indirectly; b) a summary of hypotheses on the subject; and c) the first results that air indeed moves in so-called static areas and that visitors affect both cave airflow and temperature. First results show that even in so-called static caves or within corresponding parts of cave systems, the term static has to be regarded as wrong with respect to the air currents as no situation where no air movements took place could be proven so far within the caves. Moreover, the influence of passing tourist groups on the cave climate could unequivocally be identified and demonstrated.

The relationship between local climate and radon concentration in the Temple of Baal, Jenolan Caves, Australia, 2003, Whittlestone Stewart , James Julia , Barnes Craig
Radon measurements were collected over a period of one year in a large chamber known as the Temple of Baal at Jenolan Caves, near Sydney, Australia. Correlation of radon concentrations with rainfall, surface air pressure and temperature confirmed that radon originating from different locations was predominant under different conditions. During periods of low rainfall, radon concentrations varied in strong anti-correlation with the surface air pressure, indicating that most of the radon was coming from remote locations of large pore or void volume in rock of limited permeability. On the other hand, in wet periods the observed radon levels were low and steady, suggesting a local source. In both wet and dry conditions the correlation of radon concentrations with rainfall on a time-scale of a few days was positive, proving that permeability of surface strata affected the ventilation rate in the cave. The study achieved a detailed understanding of radon concentrations in the Temple of Baal, and the main conclusion reached was that the magnitude and variation of radon concentrations in the Temple of Baal were closely related to the degree of water saturation in the local surrounds.

The relationship between local climate and radon concentration in the Temple of Baal, Jenolan Caves, Australia, 2003, Whittlestone Stewart , James Julia, Barnes Craig

Radon measurements were collected over a period of one year in a large chamber known as the Temple of Baal at Jenolan Caves, near Sydney, Australia. Correlation of radon concentrations with rainfall, surface air pressure and temperature confirmed that radon originating from different locations was predominant under different conditions. During periods of low rainfall, radon concentrations varied in strong anti-correlation with the surface air pressure, indicating that most of the radon was coming from remote locations of large pore or void volume in rock of limited permeability. On the other hand, in wet periods the observed radon levels were low and steady, suggesting a local source. In both wet and dry conditions the correlation of radon concentrations with rainfall on a time-scale of a few days was positive, proving that permeability of surface strata affected the ventilation rate in the cave. The study achieved a detailed understanding of radon concentrations in the Temple of Baal, and the main conclusion reached was that the magnitude and variation of radon concentrations in the Temple of Baal were closely related to the degree of water saturation in the local surrounds.


Faunal dynamics in the Železna jama cave, 2004, Novak Tone, Sambol Jož, Ica, Janž, Ekovič, Franc

In 2000-2001, the fauna of and ecological conditions in the Železna jama cave near Dob in the isolated karst area of Domžale-Moravče (east of the town of Domžale, central Slovenia), were investigated. Fifty-three species were found in the cave, the dominant ones being Meta menardi, Amilenus auriantiacus, Troglophilus neglectus, T. cavicola, Laemosthenes schreibersi, Ceuthmonocharis robici, Limonia nubeculosa and an undetermined phorid species. The troglomorphotic taxa found were: Zospeum sp., C. robici, Anophthalmus sp. among others. Besides seasonal changes in the local and the cave climate, changes in drought intensity and the varying quantities of organic matter in the substrate were probably the most important factors triggering migrations. Animals migrated between the cave and the surface, adjacent fissure systems and the water channel in the bottom of the cave, which is inaccessible to humans.


Studies of Condensation/Evaporation processes in the Glowworm Cave, New Zealand., 2006, De Freitas Chris R. , Schmekal Antje Anna
The condensation/evaporation process is important in caves, especially in tourist caves where there is carbon dioxide enriched air caused by visitors. The cycle of condensation and evaporation of condensate is believed to enhance condensation corrosion. The problem is condensation is difficult to measure. This study addresses the problem and reports on a method for measuring and modelling condensation rates in a limestone cave. Electronic sensors for measuring condensation and evaporation of the condensate as part of a single continuous process of water vapour flux are tested and used to collect 12 months of data. The study site is the Glowworm tourist cave in New Zealand. The work describes an explanatory model of processes leading to condensation using data based on measurements of condensation and evaporation as part of a single continuous process of water vapour flux. The results show that the model works well. However, one of the most important messages from the research reported here is the introduction of the condensation sensor. The results show that condensation in caves can actually be measured and monitored, virtually in real time. In conjunction with the recent developments in data logging equipment, this opens exciting perspectives in cave climate studies, and, more generally, in hydrogeological studies in karst terrains.

Karst and Cryokarst, 2007,

"Karst and Cryokarst", dedicated to the memory of Teresa Wiszniowska (authority on research of large fossil mammals, cave bear especially) and Marian Pulina (authority on speleology and geomorphology), contains works covering the subjects of their broad scientific interests.
The book is a joint publication of IGU Karst Commission and UIS Commission Glacier Caves and Cryokarst in Polar and High Mountain Regions /GLACKIPR/.

Contents:
Eraso A., Domìnguez M.C.
Subpolar glacier network as natural sensors of global warming evolution
Mavlyudov B.R.
Internal drainage systems of glaciers
Schroeder J.
Moulins of a subpolar glacier seen as a thermal anomaly Domìnguez M.C., Eraso A.
Frequent systematic errors In the measurements of the glacier discharge
Domínguez M.C., Eraso A.
Substantial changes happened during the last years in the icecap of King George, Insular Antarctica
Eraso A., Domínguez M.C.
Physicochemical characteristics of the subglacier discharge in Potter Cove, King George Island, Antarctica
Sauro U.
Forms of mixed origin in the karst environment of the Venetian Prealps
Auly T.
Quelques morphologies de rapport karst/glaciaire dans les Pyrénées (France)
Pawłowska-Bielawska P.
Evolution of Wielka Śnieżna Cave in the light of geomorphologic observations
Dobrowolski R.
Model of glaciogenic transformation of the Lublin-Volhynia chalk karst (Poland SE, Ukraine NW)
Bieroński J., Socha P., Stefaniak K.
Deposits and fauna of the Sudetic caves ? the state of research Trofimova E.V.
Particularités du développement récent du karst calcaire de Sibérie et d'Extrême-Orient (Russie)
Cao Jianhua, Yuan Daoxian, Zhang Cheng, Jiang Zhangcheng
Karst ecosystem of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region constrained by geological setting: Relationship between carbonate rock exposure and vegetation coverage
Smieja A., Smieja-Król B.
Springs with active calcium carbonate precipitation in the Polish part of the Tatra Mountains
Parise M., Trisciuzzi M.A.
Geomechanical characterization of carbonate rock masses in underground karst systems
Piasecki J., Sawiński T.
Acoustic measurements of airflow in speleo-climatological studies
Kadebskaya O.
News in monitoring system and recommendations in development of use and protection of Kungur Ice cave
Mokrushina O.
Ordinskaya cave as new object of speleoturism

Book is available at the Department of Geomorphology University of Silesia ordering via e-mail: atyc@us.edu.pl


PHySICAL AND CHEMICAL RESEARCH IN VELEBITA PIT (CROATIA), 2008, Paar Dalibor, Ujevi? Magdalena, Baki? Darko, Lackovi? Damir, ?op Ana & Radoli? Vanja
We have performed measurements of the cave microclimate, water quality parameters and radon concentration to a depth of -1000 m in Velebita Cave system (Northern Velebit, Croatia). The results were analyzed as a function of the cave depth and geomorphological characteristics. Two different air temperature gradients were obtained, which can be attributed to a cave morphology and air circulation in the upper part of the pit. The water quality parameters show that the studied waters are poorly mineralized and are of weakly alkaline type. Water chemistry is probably predominantly controlled by the petrography of the bedrock (limestone) and the cave morphology. Water in the cave is not affected by pollution. The average value of radon concentration is rather low, much lower than in some other Croatian caves.

Environmental Monitoring in the Mechara caves, Southeastern Ethiopia: Implications for Speleothem Palaeoclimate Studies, 2008, Asrat A. , Baker A. , Leng M. J. , Gunn J. And Umer M.
The interpretation of palaeoclimate records in speleothems depends on the understanding of the modern climate of the region, the geology, the hydrology above the caves, and the within-cave climate. Monitoring within-cave climate variability, geochemistry of speleothem-forming drip waters, and associated surface and groundwater, provides a modern baseline for interpretation of speleothem palaeohydrological and palaeoclimate records. Here, we present results of such monitoring of the Mechara caves in southeastern Ethiopia, conducted between 2004 and 2007. Results show nearly constant within-cave climate (temperature and humidity) in all caves, which generally reflects the surface climate. Groundwater and surface water geochemistry is similar across the region (except slight modification by local lithological variations) and modern drip water isotope data fall close to regional Meteoric Water Line, but speleothems further from equilibrium. Holocene and modern speleothems from these caves give high-resolution climate records, implying that the Mechara caves provide a suitable setting for the deposition of annually laminated speleothems that could record surface climate variability in a region where rainfall is sensitive to both the strength of the intertropical convergence zone as well as Indian Monsoon variability.

Heat exchanges in the heterothermic zone of a karst system: Monlesi cave, Swiss Jura Mountains, 2008, Luetscher M. , Lismonde B. , Jeannin Py.
Subsurface ice accumulations in temperate karst environments are assumed to be highly sensitive to external climate forcing and therefore represent a favorable setting for studying processes controlling heat exchanges in the heterothermic zone of a karst system. Air, rock, water, and ice temperatures were measured and complemented by airflow, water discharge, and cave air humidity data during a case study carried out between 2001 and 2006 at Monlesi ice cave in the Swiss Jura Mountains. The energy balance of the system could be quantified for an annual cycle, and results demonstrate that forced convection, which is controlled by the temperature difference between the cave air and the external atmosphere, is a driving force for the heat exchange between the cave and the surrounding environment. Therefore compared to the external mean annual conditions, major thermal anomalies are to be expected in the entrance zone of a cave system. Since this heterothermic zone may extend over several hundreds of meters, a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling the subsurface deposition environment represents a major prerequisite for high-resolution paleoenvironmental reconstructions from cave deposits.

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