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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That soil mechanics is the science of dealing with the mechanical properties of soils [16].?

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Your search for crustaceans (Keyword) returned 25 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 25
Eastern Group of Monolistrini (Crustacea, Isopoda): II. Biological part., 1965, Sket Boris
Following the first systematic part, in this paper the author describes the biological observations made on these Isopod Crustaceans of underground waters. The different sexual characters of the particular groups and the related differences in the behaviour before copulation are described. During the embryonic and larval development small differences between sub-genus are reported. To the differences in Caecospaeroma (according to Daum) the first and second "mancastadium" and another "postmanca stadium" with pereiopods VII not wholly formed have to be added. The author describes the growth of the different parts of the corps and the extremities, comprising the sexual characters.

The Crustaceans of the reservoir of the Fontaine des Suisses at Dijon., 1966, Dussart Bernard, Graf Franois, Husson Roger
Inventory of the Crustaceans collected in the basin of the Fonatine des Suisses at Dijon. The Copepoda are represented by 5 species: Macrocyclops albidits, Eucyclops serrulatus in two slightly different forms, Eucyclops serrulatus var. mihi, Acanthocyclops venustus, Acanthocyclops vernalis and Acanthocyclops robustus. The coexistence of these two last forms in this very tiny environment makes it probable that we have here to do with two distinct species. A determination key is given for the Genus Acanthocyclops. Amphipoda are represented by Niphargus virei and especially Niphargus kochianus kochianus of which more than 100 samples have been collected. Of this last small species some considerations regarding geography, the laying of eggs, sexual dimorphism and closely related species are also given.

Contribution to the systematics of African Stenasellinae (Asellote Crustaceans)., 1966, Magniez Guy
From 1897 to 1962, many species have been described as belonging to the genus Stenasellus Dollfus. Among all these the forms from Central Africa and one of Western Africa are not conform to the generic description of Racovitza 1924 obliging us to institute two new genera, Metastenasellus and Parastenasellus. The archaeic Asellota belong to the genus Stenasellus Dollfus, Johannella Monod, Metastenasellus nov.gen. and Parastenasellus nov. gen. are thus grouped in a sub family of Stenasellinae and the relationship between the different groups has still to be explained.

On the faculty of absorption of coloured substances by the cuticle of Caecospaeroma burgundum Dollfus, Isopod Crustacean of underground waters., 1967, Graf Franois, Marvillet Claude
The discovery, in certain subterranean waters, of "pigmented," brown or black Caecosphaeroma burgundum, led to the systematic study of the action of pigmented substances on these crustaceans. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the colorations thus obtained or observed in nature are due to the agglutination of coloured substances on the surface of the carapace and, in certain cases, to an impregnation of the cuticle itself.

On living troglobes in the waters of an Iron Mine in Lorraine., 1968, Henry Jean Paul, Marvillet Claude
Two explorations of the galleries of the Orne-Pauline iron mine at Moyeuvre-Grande (Moselle), made one year apart, resulted in the collection on each occasion of varied and abundant material (5 spp. of peracarid crustaceans and a worm) of aquatic troglobites: 3 spp. of Niphargus, one of which is new to Lorraine (N. kochianus kochianus), 2 spp. of isopods, Asellus cavaticus and Caecosphaeroma burgundum (for which this is the northernmost locality), and finally a local form of Dendrocoelides collini.

On living troglobes in the waters of an Iron Mine in Lorraine., 1968, Henry Jean Paul, Marvillet Claude
Two explorations of the galleries of the Orne-Pauline iron mine at Moyeuvre-Grande (Moselle), made one year apart, resulted in the collection on each occasion of varied and abundant material (5 spp. of peracarid crustaceans and a worm) of aquatic troglobites: 3 spp. of Niphargus, one of which is new to Lorraine (N. kochianus kochianus), 2 spp. of isopods, Asellus cavaticus and Caecosphaeroma burgundum (for which this is the northernmost locality), and finally a local form of Dendrocoelides collini.

Duration of the molts and intermolts of adults and the life span of Stenasellus virei Dollfus (troglobe Asellote Crustacean)., 1971, Magniez Guy
The author's observations of numerous cases of molting in the hypogean asellid Stenasellus virei Dollfus, 1897 appear to show that the phenomenon occurs in two steps. The loss of the anterior exuvium is separated from that of the posterior exuvium by a period of 8 to 16 days in adults from cavernicolous populations of Stenasellus virei in the Pyrenees and Cantabrian Alps. The intermolts last from 9 to 18 months for the same individuals. One must allow, for this species, a minimun life span of 10 years. Values of the same order of magnitude are anticipated for the two other Pyrenees species, Stenasellus breuili Racovitza, 1924 and Stenasellus buili Remy, 1949. These observations agree with those previously made on other cavernicolous peracarid crustaceans, such as Caecosphaeroma burgundum Dollfus and Niphargus virei Chevreux, by Daum (1954), Husson (1959) and Ginet (1960).

Duration of the molts and intermolts of adults and the life span of Stenasellus virei Dollfus (troglobe Asellote Crustacean)., 1971, Magniez Guy
The author's observations of numerous cases of molting in the hypogean asellid Stenasellus virei Dollfus, 1897 appear to show that the phenomenon occurs in two steps. The loss of the anterior exuvium is separated from that of the posterior exuvium by a period of 8 to 16 days in adults from cavernicolous populations of Stenasellus virei in the Pyrenees and Cantabrian Alps. The intermolts last from 9 to 18 months for the same individuals. One must allow, for this species, a minimun life span of 10 years. Values of the same order of magnitude are anticipated for the two other Pyrenees species, Stenasellus breuili Racovitza, 1924 and Stenasellus buili Remy, 1949. These observations agree with those previously made on other cavernicolous peracarid crustaceans, such as Caecosphaeroma burgundum Dollfus and Niphargus virei Chevreux, by Daum (1954), Husson (1959) and Ginet (1960).

The cuticular surfaces of the gnathopods of two Amphipod Crustaceans: Niphargus (hypogean Gammarid) and Gammarus (epigean Gammarid)., 1972, Sellem Evelyne
Niphargus virei and N. schellenbergi (hypogean Gammarids) as also Gammarus pulex pulex (epigean Gammarid) show on the Gn1 and Gn2 of both sexes ornamented areas which were studied with a scanning electron microscope. The ornamentations are built up of teeth. These are simple in Gammarus pulex pulex and present a sexual dimorphism on the meropodite. In N. schellenbergi and N. virei they are as often as not grouped by three. In Orchestia (Talitrid) the teeth have their bases fusioned which forms pectinate scales showing a sexual dimorphism. Outside these areas, the gnathopod cuticle of N. virei, N. schellenbergi and Gammarus pulex pulex is ornamented with ovoid papilla, each of them surmounted by a finger-like process covering over a depression.

The cuticular surfaces of the gnathopods of two Amphipod Crustaceans: Niphargus (hypogean Gammarid) and Gammarus (epigean Gammarid)., 1972, Sellem Evelyne
Niphargus virei and N. schellenbergi (hypogean Gammarids) as also Gammarus pulex pulex (epigean Gammarid) show on the Gn1 and Gn2 of both sexes ornamented areas which were studied with a scanning electron microscope. The ornamentations are built up of teeth. These are simple in Gammarus pulex pulex and present a sexual dimorphism on the meropodite. In N. schellenbergi and N. virei they are as often as not grouped by three. In Orchestia (Talitrid) the teeth have their bases fusioned which forms pectinate scales showing a sexual dimorphism. Outside these areas, the gnathopod cuticle of N. virei, N. schellenbergi and Gammarus pulex pulex is ornamented with ovoid papilla, each of them surmounted by a finger-like process covering over a depression.

Temperate preference responses of some aquatic, cave-adapted Crustaceans from Central Texas and Northeastern Mexico., 1973, Elliot William R. , W. Mitchell Robert
The temperature preference responses of five species of troglobite crustaceans were studied in a 15-30C gradient. Stygonectes hadenoecus, S. russelli and Asellus reddelli had no discernible temperature preferenda. Speocirolana bolivari had a weak preference for 20-30C. Cirolanides texensis had a pronounced preference for 20-30C, temperatures much warmer than that of its habitat. The lack of temperature preferenda in three species agrees with the hypothesis that imprisoned troglobites tend to lose responses to those environmental variables which are constant in caves. S. bolivari may retain its temperature selectivity because of a slow rate of cave-adaptation. It is hypothised that C. texensis is recently descended from a tropical, epigean, freshwater ancestor.

Branchiobdellids (Annelida: Clitellata) from some Eastern North American caves, with descriptions of new species of the Genus Cambarincola., 1973, Holt Perry C.
Branchiobdellids are found as epizoites on crustaceans of the orders Isopoda and Decapoda (cambarine crayfishes) in caves of eastern North America. Species that may be considered as troglobites, since they are not known from epigean waters, appear to be confirmed to truly troglobitic isopods and possibly a few troglobitic crayfishes from Florida and the Tennessee-Kentucky Highland Rim cave belt. The majority of the records of branchiobdellids from caves are of representatives of common epigean forms epizootic un crayfishes. Cross-referenced lists of branchiobdellids, their hosts and cave localities are presented. Some of the new species described are apparently troglobitic or troglophilic, but they present no consistent phylogenetic or geographical pattern and separate origins for them from primitive stocks of the genus Cambarincola are postulated.

Temperate preference responses of some aquatic, cave-adapted Crustaceans from Central Texas and Northeastern Mexico., 1973, Elliot William R. , W. Mitchell Robert
The temperature preference responses of five species of troglobite crustaceans were studied in a 15-30C gradient. Stygonectes hadenoecus, S. russelli and Asellus reddelli had no discernible temperature preferenda. Speocirolana bolivari had a weak preference for 20-30C. Cirolanides texensis had a pronounced preference for 20-30C, temperatures much warmer than that of its habitat. The lack of temperature preferenda in three species agrees with the hypothesis that imprisoned troglobites tend to lose responses to those environmental variables which are constant in caves. S. bolivari may retain its temperature selectivity because of a slow rate of cave-adaptation. It is hypothised that C. texensis is recently descended from a tropical, epigean, freshwater ancestor.

Branchiobdellids (Annelida: Clitellata) from some Eastern North American caves, with descriptions of new species of the Genus Cambarincola., 1973, Holt Perry C.
Branchiobdellids are found as epizoites on crustaceans of the orders Isopoda and Decapoda (cambarine crayfishes) in caves of eastern North America. Species that may be considered as troglobites, since they are not known from epigean waters, appear to be confirmed to truly troglobitic isopods and possibly a few troglobitic crayfishes from Florida and the Tennessee-Kentucky Highland Rim cave belt. The majority of the records of branchiobdellids from caves are of representatives of common epigean forms epizootic un crayfishes. Cross-referenced lists of branchiobdellids, their hosts and cave localities are presented. Some of the new species described are apparently troglobitic or troglophilic, but they present no consistent phylogenetic or geographical pattern and separate origins for them from primitive stocks of the genus Cambarincola are postulated.

Distribution of Indiana cavernicolous crayfishes and their ecto-commensal Ostracods., 1975, Hobbs Iii Horton H.
Six species and subspecies of crayfishes and four species of entocytherid ostracods are known to inhabit the subterranean streams of southern Indiana. Cambarus (E.) Iaevis (troglophile) appears to be the most widely distributed crayfish and occurs in both karst areas within the State. The troglobite, Orconectes inermis (2 subspecies), is restricted to the larger karst area in solution cavities of Mississippian carbonate rocks. The remaining crayfishes, Orconectes immunis, Orconectes propinquus and Orconectes sloanii, are not common inhabitants of cave waters and are probably trogloxenes. All of the crayfishes except O. sloanii were found to host at least one species of ostracod. From data presented, Sagittocythere barri might be expected to be found commonly in association with Orconectes inermis, Donnaldsoncythere donnaldsonensis, Uncinocythere xania and Dactylocythere susanae, however, are more commonly associated with C. (E) laevis, indicating a near host-specific relationship among these taxa. Whether these are host-specific associations or ones imposed by certain ecological parameters will require additional investigations. Although a fair understanding of the distribution of these crustaceans in the larger, Mississippian limestone belt has been obtained, additional field work on the perimeter of the spelean ranges of the several species will probably prove productive. Furthermore, considerable cave exploration and biospeleological surveys are needed in the Silurian-Devonian limestones of southeast Indiana before our knowledge of these crayfishes, entocytherids and other cave-dwelling species approaches that for the Mississippian karst of the State.

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