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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That fall is the gross slope of a river [16].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for disturbances (Keyword) returned 15 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 15
Fungal communities on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, Arizona, USA, , Vaughan Michael J. , Maier Raina M. , Pryor Barry M.

Kartchner Caverns, located near Benson, Arizona, USA, is an active carbonate cave that serves as the major attraction for Kartchner Caverns State Park. Low-impact development and maintenance have preserved prediscovery macroscopic cavern features and minimized disturbances to biological communities within the cave.. The goal of this study was to examine fungal diversity in Kartchner Caverns on actively-forming speleothem surfaces. Fifteen formations were sampled from five sites across the cave. Richness was assessed using standard culture-based fungal isolation techniques. A culture-independent analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to assay evidence of community homogeneity across the cave through the separation of 18S rDNA amplicons from speleothem community DNA. The culturing effort recovered 53 distinct morphological taxonomic units (MTUs), corresponding to 43 genetic taxonomic units (GTUs) that represented 21 genera. From the observed MTU accumulation curve and the projected total MTU richness curve, it is estimated that 51 percent of the actual MTU richness was recovered. The most commonly isolated fungi belonged to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Phialophora, and Aspergillus. This culturebased analysis did not reveal significant differences in fungal richness or number of fungi recovered across sites. Cluster analysis using DGGE band profiles did not reveal distinctive groupings of speleothems by sample site. However, canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis of culture-independent DGGE profiles showed a significant effect of sampling site and formation type on fungal community structure. Taken together, these results reveal that diverse fungal communities exist on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, and that these communities are not uniformly distributed spatially. Analysis of sample saturation indicated that more sampling depth is required to uncover the full scale of mycological richness across spelothem surfaces.


Virginia Burial Caves: An Inventory of a Desecrated Resource, 1997, Hubbard Jr. , David A. , Barber, M. B.
In an ongoing inventory of Virginia cave resources, 23 burial caves have been field documented by the Marginella Burial Cave Project (MBCP). All but one site have been vandalized to varying degrees. In addition to the burial resource inventory, goals of the MBCP include measures for site protection and education. Problems have been encountered by the MBCP in attaining these goals. The sensitive and sacred nature of these cave resources, however, warrant limiting site specific discussions to protected sites. One burial cave in Montgomery County and two in Lee County are protected by gates because of recent disturbances. Adams Cave (44MY482) served as a party cave, but was not known as a burial site until a student brought a human mandible and two long bone fragments to a college professor and an investigation ensued. Indian Burial Cave (44LE11) was known locally as a burial cave and has suffered desecration for decades. Bone Cave (44LE169) was known locally as a burial site, mistakenly attributed to black slaves, but MBCP and Phase II archaeological investigations documented this Native American burial site and provided information that helped to alter the path of a road realignment through the cave. The examination and analysis of these and other Virginia caves by the MBCP has resulted in significant new knowledge about the use and distribution of caves as Native American burial sites.

Structures tectoniques et contraintes de cheminement des eaux dans les aquiferes karstiques du barrois (Lorraine/Champagne, France), 1999, Devos A, Jaillet S, Gamez P,
Between Lorraine and Champagne, in the east of the Paris Basin, covered karst is developed in Portlandien limestone of Barrois in contact with sand and clay of the Perthois Cretaceous. The cuesta landscape is altered by folding tectonics (syncline of Treveray) and faulting tectonics (fault trough of the Marne). These govern the organization of underground flow. In low water period, hydrological methods (smoothed hydrological profiles, water tracing) display disturbances of the Barrois river (Saulx, Marne) and limits of underground watershed ('Rupt-du-Puits' cave system, 21 km long, 13 km). Macro-tectonics influence vertical infiltration (pit). Fault and dip (Macro-tectonics) divide the aquifer into different sections. Hydrological methods with flow studies confirm structural tilting of the area to the west.ResumeEntre Lorraine et Champagne, dans l'est du Bassin parisien, au contact des calcaires portlandiens du Barrois et des sables et argiles cretaces du Perthois, se developpe un karst couvert. Le paysage de cotes est ici perturbe par une tectonique souple (synclinal de Treveray) et cassante (fosse d'effon-drement de la Marne) determinant l'organisation spatiale des ecoulements. En periode d'etiage, les methodes hydrologiques (profils hydrologiques lisses, tracages), permettent de montrer l'influence de cette tectonique d'ondulation et de basculement sur l'ecoulement des rivieres barroises (Saulx, Marne). Fractures et microfractures influencent la zone de transit vertical des eaux du karst (zone des puits) tandis que les failles compartimentent les aquiferes (systeme du Rupt-du-Puits, 21 km de conduits, 13 km2). Les methodes d'etudes hydrologiques, confirment le basculement de la region vers l'ouest deduit des comparaisons de nivellement

Field assessment of the microclimatology of tropical flank margin caves, 2000, Gamble Dw, Dogwiler Jt, Mylroie J,
Temperature observations were collected inside 2 caves in the Bahamas and 1 cave in Puerto Rico to characterize the microclimatology of tropical flank margin cave systems. Three aspects of these tropical cave temperatures agree with temperate cave microclimate theory. Specifically, external atmospheric disturbances can affect temperatures inside tropical flank margin cave systems, tropical flank margin caves are warmer than the exterior temperatures during winter, and water can impact temperatures deep into a tropical flank margin cave system. The temperature observations collected also indicate potential differences between the microclimatology of tropical and temperate cave systems. In particular, the temperate 3-zone cave microclimate model may not be applicable to tropical flank margin caves, diurnal fluctuations were not apparent in tropical flank margin cave systems, and the existence of a temperature inversion in a down-sloping cave may not be applicable to all tropical flank margin caves. The potential differences in temperate and these tropical cave systems can be linked to the physical dimensions of the tropical flank margin cave systems and the unique hydrology of small carbonate islands. Specifically, tropical flank margin caves have a width greater than length while temperate fluvio-karst caves have a length greater than width and tidal water can exist in the pits and depressions of tropical flank margin caves as opposed to flowing streams in temperate cave systems

Palaeoseismic events in karst terrains along the northern Bulgarian Black Sea coast, 2001, Angelova D,
The study of the palaoseismic events in the karst terrains of the Bulgarian Black Sea coast is a very important up-to-date problem. The investigated region is one of the highest-energy regions in Bulgaria with established and recorded catastrophic historic and contemporary earthquakes. The terrain is subjected to the influence not only of its own earthquake foci but also of those in Romania and Russia. The palaeoearthquakes that caused considerable disturbances in the karst terrains along the Northern Bulgarian Black Sea coast have left significant traces. They caused disturbances in the environment and the relief (rearrangement of the surface and ground water karst basins, partially or entirely collapsed caves, deformed caves, oil, gas and salt intrusions and gravitationally formed caves). The ecological consequences in historic and contemporary aspects were catastrophic. The palaeoseismic dislocations were formed as a result of global, regional and local geodynamic events related with the destruction of the Moezian platform and the regional extension of the Black Sea basin. The time of their display and their spatial interrelations were established as a result of complex investigations accompanied by original documents

Les travertins de Saint-Antonin : squence gobotanique et climato-anthropique holocne (Bouches-du-Rhne, France), 2003, Guendon Jeanlouis, Ali Adam A. , Roiron Paul, Terral Jeanfrdric, Danna Andr, Diazdelolmo Fernando, Baenaescudero Rafael
Travertine deposit of St-Antonin (Bouches-du-Rhne, France): lithostratigraphy, palaeobotany and Holocene palaeoenvironments - Travertines are carbonate deposits formed generally during temperate climatic periods. The travertine of Saint-Antonin was formed during the Holocene in accordance with this model. They usually present a succession of travertinous units and detrital sedimentary levels containing, respectively, leaf impressions and charcoal; snail shells and archaeological material have also been preserved, essentially in detritial levels. Two kinds of plant remains (leaf imprints and charred wood) have been sampled and analysed, allowing the reconstruction of vegetation dynamics based on a well-defined sedimentary sequence. Our results were compared with those of previous malacalogical, archaeological studies and climatic changes. The Preboreal and Boreal sequence, characterised by travertine unites with detritial deposits, is dominated by a riverside vegetation (Populus alba, Salix sp., Phragmites communis) associated with some pubescent oak growing in the plateau. After this first period, detritial levels and hygrophilous species decrease. Correlatively travertinous facies and leaf impressions of mesophilous forest species increase (Quercus pubescent, Acer monspessulanum). They suggest the existence of homeostatic conditions, such as regular river flow, dense vegetation and few disturbances during deposition. The Middle Atlantic period shows optimal travertinisation and maintenance of forest environment. But this period is characterised by the beginning of the Quercus pubescens regression and the dominance of Acer monspessulanum. From the Atlantic to the first part of Subboreal, important detrital sedimentary levels disturb the deposition of carbonate. They contain reworked archaeological material dating to the Neolithic. Vegetation seems to have been profoundly affected by intensive human exploitation. This process has broken up the forested area into different plant communities and favoured the dominance of heliophilous and thermophilous species (Pinus halepensis, Rubus ulmifolius and Juniperus sp.).

Paleoseismic phenomena in karst terrains in Bulgaria and Morocco, 2003, Angelova Dora, Belfoul M'hamed Alaeddin, Bouzid Sophia, Filahi Mustapha, Faik Farid

During the recent years there has been a growing interest in recording and investigating the effects of paleoseismic events in surface and underground karst in almost all countries. Karst represents a reliable reference marker for understanding the potential seismicity in regions with instrumentally established low to moderate seismicity. The karst errains in Bulgaria and Morocco occupy considerable areas. The disturbances in surface and underground karst had usually been provoked by catastrophic one-act events or by repeatedly activated movements by earthquakes. The catastrophic seismic events had disturbed the naturally interrelated karst ecosystems and were the reason for rejuvenation, reactivation or attenuation of karst processes. The natural surface and underground relief had been partially or entirely destroyed; a new type of relief had been formed; the geological environment had been disturbed; changes occurred in the flowrate and direction of surface and underground karst water; wetlands of the gravitation type had been formed; natural caves, local grabens, rock-falls and landslides collapsed partially or entirely and terrains were subjected to subsidence and destruction; the ecological balance in urbanized territories had been disturbed. The present work considers the different types of paleoseismic phenomena in the karst terrains in Bulgaria and Morocco. Recommendations are given for the protection of these areas.


Human influence on the choice of winter dens by European brown bears in Slovenia, 2004, Petram Welf, Knauer Felix, Kaczensky Petra,
The Slovenian brown bear (Ursus arctos ) population is the only viable population in Central and Western Europe, and it coexists with humans in a multi-use landscape. Bears are most vulnerable to human disturbances during denning. To assess the influence of humans on the choice of winter dens by bears we compared availability and use of caves suitable for denning in central Slovenia. Surprisingly, all direct measures of human influence showed no or only a small effect on the use of the caves by bears. We found that the landscape type (big dolines, canyons, river valleys, and karst plateau) was the most important variable. The less accessible a landscape type is, the more it is used. The probability that a cave in a big doline is used is about 200 times higher than on the karst plateau. Furthermore bears preferred long caves with small entrances away from villages. Bears did not use any cave caves were predicted correctly by our model of being used or unused. For conservation and human safety reasons, human activity should be banned from steep ravines and large karst dolines in winter

Thermal variations in the hyporheic zone of a karst stream, 2005, Dogwiler T. , Wicks C.

This investigation quantifies how temperatures fluctuate in relation to discharge, seasonal, and diurnal temperature variations. Furthermore, the linkages between meteorological processes and temperature variation in the hyporheic zone are delineated. Examination of a high-resolution, three dimensional record of temperature variation in a karst stream substrate provides insight into thermal disturbances in the hyporheic zone. Temperatures in the upper portion of the hyporheic zone are strongly linked to air temperatures via the surface water. The variation is considerably less as depth increases. The annual temperature variation in the lower portion of the shallow hyporheic zone is reduced by one-third, relative to the variation observed in the surface water and upper substrate. During storm events, the upper portion (0-5 cm) of the shallow hyporheic zone is subject to a thermal regime very similar to surface stream water. However, below these depths the sharpest temperature fluctuations are effectively muted within the stream substrate. More frequent diurnal variations, particularly those associated with baseflow conditions, are also dampened within the substrate.


Thermal Variations in the Hyporheic Zone of a Karst Stream., 2006, Dogwiler Toby, Wicks Carol
This investigation quantifies how temperatures in the streambed sediments of a karst stream fluctuate in relation to discharge, seasonal, and diurnal temperature variations as the stream passes through a karst window. Furthermore, the linkages between meteorological processes and temperature variation in the hyporheic zone are delineated. Examination of a high-resolution, three dimensional record of temperature variation in a karst stream substrate provides insight into thermal disturbances in the hyporheic zone. Temperatures in the upper portion of the hyporheic zone are strongly linked to air temperatures via the surface water. The variation is considerably less as depth increases. The annual temperature variation in the lower portion of the shallow hyporheic zone is reduced by one-third, relative to the variation observed in the surface water and upper substrate. During storm events, the upper portion (0-5 cm) of the shallow hyporheic zone is subject to a thermal regime very similar to surface stream water. However, below these depths the sharpest temperature fluctuations are effectively muted within the stream substrate. More frequent diurnal variations, particularly those associated with baseflow conditions, are also dampened within the substrate.

SEISMIC-SAG STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS IN TERTIARY CARBONATE ROCKS BENEATH SOUTHEASTERN FLORIDA, USA: EVIDENCE FOR HYPOGENIC SPELEOGENESIS?, 2009, Cunningham K. , Walker C.

High-resolution, multichannel seismic-re?ection data recently acquired mostly in Biscayne Bay, southeastern Florida, exhibit disturbances in parallel seismic re?ections that correspond to the carbonate rocks of the Floridan aquifer system and lower part of the overlying intermediate con?ning unit. These disruptions in seismic re?ections are indicative of structural characteristics in carbonate rocks of Eocene to middle Miocene age that are interpreted to be related to collapsed paleocaves or collapsed paleocave systems, and include (1) fractures; (2) faults; (3) narrow (hundreds-of-m- scale wide) seismic-sag structural systems; and (4) broad (km-scale wide) seismic-sag structural systems. Commonly, the seismic-sag structural systems are multistoried, re?ecting a vertical arrangement of cyclic zones of structural sags that exhibit a progressive evolution from cave formation; cave collapse; suprastratal sag; and in some cases, ?nal in?ll of the upward termination of sag zones. In the study area, these structural systems are buried by upper Miocene-to-Holocene sedimentary rocks and sediments; however, they may manifest as well-documented, hundreds-of-m-scale wide, sinkholes along the submarine surface of the continental margin in the Straits of Florida. The potential link between the seismic sags and submarine sinkholes suggests the sea?oor sinkholes began to form as early as during the Eocene. We will discuss, speleogenic mechanisms dominating the formation of the narrow, seismic-sag structures that include: vadose, water-table, regional mixing zone corrosive, and ?ank-margin processes. Further, three mechanisms are postulated for the speleogenesis of the paleocave systems associated with the broad seismic-sag structural systems: (1) corrosion by an Eocene mixed fresh-saltwater zone associated with a regional groundwater ?ow system beneath the southern part of the paleo-Florida Platform, (2) hypogenic speleogenesis associated with upward groundwater ?ow driven by Kohout convection and dissolution by mixed fresh and saline groundwater, or (3) hypogenic spelogenesis associated with the upward ascension of hydrogen-sul?de-bearing groundwater charged by dissolution and the reduction of calcium sulfates in deeper Eocene or Paleocene rocks. We will contrast and compare our theories on the timing and processes involved in the formation of seismic-sag structural systems with those proposed in the existing literature for the submarine sinkholes on the continental margin in the Straits of Florida, and discuss how the seismic-sag structural systems and submarine sinkholes may be linked. Future marine seismic data acquisition and interpretation is planned to help develop more accurate timing of formation of paleocaves and paleocave systems, their collapse, and structural impact on suprastratal rocks, and more decisive insight into the speleogenic processes that proceed during the evolution of these seismic-sag structural systems within the Florida Platform.


Evaluating disturbance on mediterranean karst areas: the example of Sardinia (Italy), 2009, De Waele Jo, Forti Paolo

Evaluating the human disturbance on karst areas is a difficult task because of the complexity of these peculiar and unique environments. The human impact on karstic geo-ecosystems is increasingly important and there is an increasing need for multidisciplinary tools to assess the environmental changes in karst areas. Many disciplines, such as biology, geomorphology, hydrology and sociale-conomical sciences are to be considered to sufficiently evaluate the impact on these intrinsically vulnerable areas.

This article gives an overview of the evolution of environmental impact on karst areas of the island Sardinia (Italy). For this particular case, the most important impacts in the past 50 years are derived from the following activities, in decreasing importance: (1) mining and quarrying; (2) deforestation, agriculture and grazing; (3) building (widespread urbanisation, isolated homes, etc.) and related infrastructures (roads, sewer systems, aqueducts, waste dumps, etc.); (4) tourism; (5) military activities. To evaluate the present environmental state of these areas the Disturbance Index for Karst environments [Van Beynen and Townsend (Environ Manage 36:101–116)] is applied in a slightly modified version. Instead of considering the indicators of environmental disturbances used in the original method, this slightly modified index evaluates the disturbances causing the deterioration of the environmental attributes. In the Sardinian case study, 27 disturbances have been evaluated, giving rise to the definition of a Disturbance Index ranging between 0 (Pristine) and 1 (highly disturbed). This Disturbance Index simplifies the original KDI method, appears to adequately measure disturbance on Mediterranean karst areas and could be applied with success to other similar regions.


Fungal communities on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, Arizona, USA, 2011, Vaughan M. J. , Maier R. M. , Pryor B. M.

Kartchner Caverns, located near Benson, Arizona, USA, is an active carbonate cave that serves as the major attraction for Kartchner
Caverns State Park. Low-impact development and maintenance have preserved prediscovery macroscopic cavern features and
minimized disturbances to biological communities within the cave.. The goal of this study was to examine fungal diversity in Kartchner
Caverns on actively-forming speleothem surfaces. Fifteen formations were sampled from five sites across the cave. Richness
was assessed using standard culture-based fungal isolation techniques. A culture-independent analysis using denaturing gradient
gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to assay evidence of community homogeneity across the cave through the separation of
18S rDNA amplicons from speleothem community DNA. The culturing effort recovered 53 distinct morphological taxonomic units
(MTUs), corresponding to 43 genetic taxonomic units (GTUs) that represented 21 genera. From the observed MTU accumulation
curve and the projected total MTU richness curve, it is estimated that 51 percent of the actual MTU richness was recovered. The
most commonly isolated fungi belonged to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Phialophora, and Aspergillus. This culturebased
analysis did not reveal significant differences in fungal richness or number of fungi recovered across sites. Cluster analysis
using DGGE band profiles did not reveal distinctive groupings of speleothems by sample site. However, canonical correspondence
analysis (CCA) analysis of culture-independent DGGE profiles showed a significant effect of sampling site and formation type on
fungal community structure. Taken together, these results reveal that diverse fungal communities exist on speleothem surfaces in
Kartchner Caverns, and that these communities are not uniformly distributed spatially. Analysis of sample saturation indicated that
more sampling depth is required to uncover the full scale of mycological richness across spelothem surfaces.


Kopfber durch den Winter Ein berblick zum Internationalen Jahr der Fledermaus , 2011, Brger, K.
In Central Europe most bat species spend a major part of their life time in subterranean cavities. In winter they need habitats providing protection against frosty temperatures. Also, hibernation plays an important role to overcome low insect availability and to preserve fat stores. In Austria 16 out of 28 bat species hibernate in caves and other subterranean winter roosts. These are Greater Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum), Lesser Horseshoe Bat (Rhinolophus hipposideros), Greater Mouse-eared Bat (Myotis myotis), Lesser Mouse-eared Bat (Myotis oxygnathus), Daubentons Myotis (Myotis daubentonii), Brown Big-eared Bat (Plecotus auritus), Gray Big-eared Bat (Plecotus austriacus), Mountain Long-eared Bat (Plecotus macrobullaris), Bechsteins Myotis (Myotis bechsteinii), Geoffroys Bat (Myotis emarginatus), Natterers Bat (Myotis nattereri), Whiskered Bat (Myotis mystacinus), Brandts Myotis (Myotis brandtii), Serotine (Eptesicus serotinus), Northern Bat (Eptesicus nilssonii) and Schreibers Long-fingered Bat (Miniopterus schreibersii). Threats to many species are not only caused by human disturbances in winter roosts but also in - clude a multitude of human impacts in summer roosts as well as in foraging habitats. This is reflected in the conservation status of each species which are protected by the Council Directive on the conservation of natural habitats and of wild fauna and flora. To reduce these threats and achieve sustain success, public relations and cooperation with people, conservation organisations, cave associations and responsible authorities is necessary.

Clastic Sediments in Caves, 2012, Springer, Gregory S.

This article focuses on the natures, origins, and significances of clastic sediments in caves. Clastic sediments are fragments of preexisting rocks that have been transported and redeposited. Streams transport large quantities of clastic sediments through caves, including stream gravels and mud, but clastic sediments also move as gravity flows by slumping and sliding. Sedimentology and stratigraphy offer the means to understand the origins and transport mechanisms behind individual clastic deposits. Together, the two methodologies consider layering within deposits and grain sizes, sorting, mineralogies, and sedimentary structures within individual beds. Facies are recognized where those variables include diagnostic properties tied to particular depositional processes or driving forces. As is shown using examples, stratigraphy and facies analysis make it possible to reconstruct cave or landscape histories, including system responses to disturbances such as climate change and land use. Notably, system responses typically reflect changes in sediment supply, hydraulic gradients, or obstructions. These factors are recorded in passage morphologies, which should always be considered when studying clastic sediments in caves, and examples are cited.


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