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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That diatomaceous earth is a light-colored, soft, siliceous earth composed of the shells of diatoms, a form of algae. some deposits are of lake origin but the largest are marine [6].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
Engineering challenges in Karst, Stevanović, Zoran; Milanović, Petar
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Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy), Dimuccio, L.A.; Rodrigues, N.; Larocca, F.; Pratas, J.; Amado, A.M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.A.
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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Your search for ecosystem (Keyword) returned 134 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 134
The ecological classification of cave and fissure water in the underground water habitats., 1967, Husmann Siegfried
Bodies of waters in caves and in crevices of rocks are distinguished from the other subsoil water ecosystems ("eustygon", "stygorhithron", "stygopotamon") under the names "troglostygon" and "petrostygon". The colonisation of subsoil water biotopes involves a fundamental principle which controls the development of the main biotopes for the stygobiont undergroundwater organisms. According to this ecological rule, which is described in detail and formulated, the several interstitial biotopes (for example "eustygopsammal," "rhithrostygopsammal," "potamostygopsephal") are to be considered as the real biotopes of the stygobiont subsoil water organisms; waters in caves, on the contrary, are secondary biotopes of these animals. Caves which contain marine water are described as ecostystem "Thalassotroglon" in their relation to "limnotroglon" (= "stygotroglon"). In this why the contact between "limnospeology" and "thalassospeology" is established, and the limnic and marine microcavernal biotopes; "thalassopsammal" and "thalassopsephal"; are also taken in consideration. "Limnospeology" and "thalassospeology" as limnological and thalassological investigations of subsoil water are characterized as biological fields of work, which serve for the investigation of an ecological unit.

The ecological classification of cave and fissure water in the underground water habitats., 1967, Husmann Siegfried
Bodies of waters in caves and in crevices of rocks are distinguished from the other subsoil water ecosystems ("eustygon", "stygorhithron", "stygopotamon") under the names "troglostygon" and "petrostygon". The colonisation of subsoil water biotopes involves a fundamental principle which controls the development of the main biotopes for the stygobiont undergroundwater organisms. According to this ecological rule, which is described in detail and formulated, the several interstitial biotopes (for example "eustygopsammal," "rhithrostygopsammal," "potamostygopsephal") are to be considered as the real biotopes of the stygobiont subsoil water organisms; waters in caves, on the contrary, are secondary biotopes of these animals. Caves which contain marine water are described as ecostystem "Thalassotroglon" in their relation to "limnotroglon" (= "stygotroglon"). In this why the contact between "limnospeology" and "thalassospeology" is established, and the limnic and marine microcavernal biotopes; "thalassopsammal" and "thalassopsephal"; are also taken in consideration. "Limnospeology" and "thalassospeology" as limnological and thalassological investigations of subsoil water are characterized as biological fields of work, which serve for the investigation of an ecological unit.

Microecosystems in Lehman Cave, Nevada, 1969, Stark, N.

Bats as Primary Producers in an Ecosystem, 1972, Horst, Roy

Bat Guano Ecosystems, 1972, Poulson, Thomas L.

Spatial biometrie in the subterranean ecosystem: distribution of Meta menardi Latr. (Argiopidae)., 1972, Tercafs Raymond
The spatial distribution of 113 individuals from the species Meta menardi Latr. (Argiopidae) divided in 10 different populations living in 8 Belgian caves has been studied. A grouping test and the calculation of R according to Clark et Evans (1954), based on the measurement of the distance to the nearest neighbour, have been used. Results show that the individuals are distributed at random inside their biotope.

Spatial biometrie in the subterranean ecosystem: distribution of Meta menardi Latr. (Argiopidae)., 1972, Tercafs Raymond
The spatial distribution of 113 individuals from the species Meta menardi Latr. (Argiopidae) divided in 10 different populations living in 8 Belgian caves has been studied. A grouping test and the calculation of R according to Clark et Evans (1954), based on the measurement of the distance to the nearest neighbour, have been used. Results show that the individuals are distributed at random inside their biotope.

A preliminary note on the spatial distribution of Meta menardi, Triphosa dubitata, Triphosa sabaudiata, Nelima aurantiaca and Culex pipiens within a cave ecosystem (Grotte de la Scierie: Haute-Savoie)., 1976, Bourne John D.
Following 8 months of observations in a richly populated cave, (Grotte de la Scierie, HauteSavoie, France), it has been possible to outline the movements and distribution of Meta menardi (Araneae), Nelima aurantiaca (Opiliones), Triphosa dubitata and Triphosa sabaudiata (Lepidoptera) and Culex pipiens (Diptera) within the cave ecosystem. Although no general rule can be postulated it appears that the morphology of the cave walls and the climatic conditions regulate the distribution of these 5 species within the cave ecosystem. The interactions between the 5 species have been investigated.

Structure et Fonctionnement des Ecosystmes du Haut-Rhone Franais; VIII: Hydrologie de deux stations phratiques dont l'eau alimente des bras morts., 1981, Gibert J. , Ginet Rene, Mathieu J. , Reygrobellet Jean Luc
We have been working since 1975 on phreatic stations providing two old meanders of the French river Rhone with interstitial water. The hydrological characteristics are quite different (see diagrams in the text):; The one (station 2) is a particular under-flow circulating laterally to the river ("paracoulement"), which is closely subordinate with the varying level of the Rhone.; The other (station 8) is the confluence of continental phreatic water proceeding from a Northeastern plateau (the "Dombes") with the hyporheic of the river Ain (eastern tributary of the Rhone). The Rhone has no influence on the characteristics of this second interstitial flow. The physico-chemical disparity of these stations clearly appeared during two extremely opposite climatic periods; the inferences on resident populations are considered.

Structure et Fonctionnement des Ecosystmes do Haut-Rhone Franais; IX: Analyse des peuplements de deux stations phratiques alimentant des bras morts., 1981, Gibert J. , Ginet Rene, Mathieu J. , Reygrobellet Jean Luc
Two phreatic stations providing old meanders of the French river Rhone ("Lones") with interstitial water have been studied for three years. The samples (100 liters of water) have been collected by the Bou-Rouch method at 60 cm deep in the sediment. The analyses of populations show that the biocenoses of the two stations are quite different: The one (Station 2) is rather specialized; most of the species are troglobitic (80% of the whole biomass; the only Amphipod, Niphargopsis casparyi, represents 67% of this biomass). The other (Station 8) is very diversified; the seven dominant groups are all epigean animals. Population numbers have changed during the three years of sampling. Fluctuations have been observed in station 2, but the total numbers were quite similar in 1975 and 1977. On the contrary, station 8 shows an "exponential" type of growth generated by epigean organisms, while troglobitic species remained unchanged.

The Edwards Aquifer: Earth's Most Diverse Groundwater Ecosystem?, 1981, Longley Glenn
Recent studies on the Edwards Aquifer, a karstic formed cavernous system in Texas, indicate an extremely diverse community of aquatic troglobites. Sampling of wells and springs is providing new insight into the dynamics of this fascinating system, which is possibly the most diverse subterranean aquatic ecosystem known in the world today.

Australian Aquatic Cavernicolous Amphipods, 1985, Knott, Brenton

The purpose of this paper is to acquaint speleologists with preliminary results of recent researches into the amphipodan fauna from aquatic ecosystems of Australian caves, with particular reference to Western Australia. Attention is focussed particularly on the systematic and zoogeographic significance of this fauna.


Metabolic efficiency and regulation of body weight: a comparison between life in hypogean and epigean ecosystems, 1991, Biswas Jayant
In the present study metabolic efficiency in the epigean and hypogean populations of Nemacheilus evezardi (Day) was examined. Different experiments were conducted, in both populations, by keeping them either in restricted oxygen or restricted feeding conditions, including starvation. Results clearly show that the rate of oxygen consumption for the hypogean population was significantly less as compared to its epigean counterpart. Further, results also suggest that the hypogean population has a tremendous capacity to maintain its metabolic activity and regulate its body weight under severe conditions characterized by an absence or a limited supply of food.

IMPACT OF PAST SEDIMENT ECOLOGY ON ROCK FRACTURATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF CURRENT ECOSYSTEMS (JURA, FRANCE), 1991, Gaiffe M, Bruckert S,
Differences in the fracture type of limestone rocks have resulted in the formation of several main plant soil ecosystems in the montane and subalpine zones of the Jura (800-1 700 m). The sites were on stable landscape with slope < 5%. Locations were chosen to reflect the variation in physical properties of the bedrock and lithic contact. The rock fractures (densities and size), the shape and size of the fragments and the hydraulic conductivities were described and analyzed to characterize the 3 main bedrocks in the area studied (table 1): 1), lapiaz, ie, large rock fragments separated from each other by wide fractures (figs 1-2), 'broken' rocks traversed by numerous fine fractures (fig 2-3), paving-stones crossed by infrequent narrow fractures (fig 3). The effects of rock fracturing on vegetation (table II) and soil formation were significant in reference to porosity and permeability relationships (figs 6-7). Under similar precipitation, meteoric waters flow through the soil and porosity is relative to fracture systems (figs 4, 5). The weathering of cobbles in the soil profiles and along the lithic contacts maintains different soil solution Ca levels and is an important variable in soil and ecosystem formation (table III). Regarding the regional orogenic phases and the tectonic origin of the fractures, we postulate that the different types of fracturation originated from the different chemical and mineralogic composition of the rocks. Significant differences exist in both the calcite and dolomite content, in the insoluble residue content (table IV) and in the percentage of organic matter of the carbonate-free residues (table V, fig 8). The results indicate that the differences in rock composition arose early at about the period of sedimentation. The origin of the differentiation might be due to the sedimentation conditions and environment (fig 9). It is concluded that the present-day plant soil ecosystems may be related to the marine sediment environments of the Jurassic period (fig 10)

Surface locations of potential aquifer ecosystem on Mars, 1991, Trego Kent D. ,

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