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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That photosynthesis is the process by which green plants convert carbon dioxide and water into simple sugar. chlorophyll and sunlight are essential to the series of complex chemical reactions involved in the process [23].?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

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Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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Your search for eyeless (Keyword) returned 14 results for the whole karstbase:
Geographic distribution and validity of the troglobe species Asellus lusitanicus Frade (Asellote Crustacean)., 1967, Magniez Guy.
The troglobitic Asellid Asellus lusitanicus Frade (1938) is now known from three caves of the Serra de Aire (Central Portugal). It seems to be a good eyeless species of the "coxalis" group.

A new cave amphipod Crustacea from Japan., 1971, Ueno Masuzo
A new eyeless Amphipod Crustacea 5 mm long was found in Himis-d Cave in Tokushima Prefecture, Shikoku. The inner ramus of its third uropod is nearly as long as the unijointed outer ramus. The accessory flagellum of the first antenna consists only of a single joint. The first maxilla is distinctive in its small palp which does not extend beyond the apical margin of the outer plate and bears only an apical seta. In these characteristic features the present form is different from any known species of the genera of the Crangonyx and Hadzia groups and seems to belong to a new species, on the basis of which the new genus Awacaris is created.

A new cave amphipod Crustacea from Japan., 1971, Ueno Masuzo
A new eyeless Amphipod Crustacea 5 mm long was found in Himis-d Cave in Tokushima Prefecture, Shikoku. The inner ramus of its third uropod is nearly as long as the unijointed outer ramus. The accessory flagellum of the first antenna consists only of a single joint. The first maxilla is distinctive in its small palp which does not extend beyond the apical margin of the outer plate and bears only an apical seta. In these characteristic features the present form is different from any known species of the genera of the Crangonyx and Hadzia groups and seems to belong to a new species, on the basis of which the new genus Awacaris is created.

A cavernicolous asellid of southern Spain: Proasellus solanasi n. sp. (Crustacea, Isopoda, Asellota)., 1972, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless species of the genus Proasellus Dudich, from an underground stream in the province of Malaga (Southern Spain). It belongs to the phyletic line which gave rise to the modem epigean water-slater Proasellus rneridianus (Racovitza).

A cavernicolous asellid of southern Spain: Proasellus solanasi n. sp. (Crustacea, Isopoda, Asellota)., 1972, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless species of the genus Proasellus Dudich, from an underground stream in the province of Malaga (Southern Spain). It belongs to the phyletic line which gave rise to the modem epigean water-slater Proasellus rneridianus (Racovitza).

Trichonisciidae of the Su Mannau cave, Southwest Sardinia (Crustacea, Isopoda)., 1973, Argano Roberto
Description of three eyeless and apigmented new species of Trichoniscidae which have been found in Su Mannau cave in Sardinia. Two of them belong to the genus Catalauniscus Vandel: Catalauniscus hirundinella n.sp. offering few relationships with the spanish species C. espanoli Vandel, and Catalauniscus puddui n.sp. which has also similar features to an iberian form, C. bolivari Arcangeli. The third (Scotoniscus janas n.sp.) belongs to the endemic genus Scotoniscus Racovitza, until now monospecific and represented by a series of subspecies from the Northern Pyrenees, all nearly related to the specific form S. rnacromelos Racovitza. The discovery of those three new species brings forward additional arguments to the thesis of a Tyrrhenian origin of these taxa of Trichoniscidae.

A new cavericolous Asellid from Central Spain: Bragasellus lagari n.sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1973, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless Asellid, belonging to the Iberian Genus Bragasellus Henry et Magniez, 1968. The new species lives in the underground stream of the Cueva del Tornero (Checa, province of Guadalajara, central Spain).

Trichonisciidae of the Su Mannau cave, Southwest Sardinia (Crustacea, Isopoda)., 1973, Argano Roberto
Description of three eyeless and apigmented new species of Trichoniscidae which have been found in Su Mannau cave in Sardinia. Two of them belong to the genus Catalauniscus Vandel: Catalauniscus hirundinella n.sp. offering few relationships with the spanish species C. espanoli Vandel, and Catalauniscus puddui n.sp. which has also similar features to an iberian form, C. bolivari Arcangeli. The third (Scotoniscus janas n.sp.) belongs to the endemic genus Scotoniscus Racovitza, until now monospecific and represented by a series of subspecies from the Northern Pyrenees, all nearly related to the specific form S. rnacromelos Racovitza. The discovery of those three new species brings forward additional arguments to the thesis of a Tyrrhenian origin of these taxa of Trichoniscidae.

A new cavericolous Asellid from Central Spain: Bragasellus lagari n.sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota)., 1973, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless Asellid, belonging to the Iberian Genus Bragasellus Henry et Magniez, 1968. The new species lives in the underground stream of the Cueva del Tornero (Checa, province of Guadalajara, central Spain).

A new interstitial Asellid from southern Spain: Bragasellus boui n.sp. (Crustacea Isopoda Asellota) and some reflections on European Asellidae genera., 1974, Henry Jean Paul, Magniez Guy
Description of a new, unpigmented and eyeless Asellid, belonging to the iberian genus Bragasellus Henry et Magniez, 1968. Eragasellus boui, n.sp., lives on the bottom of a river that is a tributary of Guadalquivir River (Southern Spain). Bragasellus, Proasellus, Stygasellus and Synasellus are four genuine phyletic lines of European Asellidae, all of them independent of each other, and the authors confirm their validity as true genera.

Remarks about the psammic Asellid Proasellus walteri (Chappuis, 1948) (Crustacea, Isopoda, Asellota)., 1976, Henry Jean Paul
P. walteri, an eyeless species of tiny size and thin body, shows numerous original characters. By its general morphology, it is one form of Asellid best adapted to the phreatic waters where it exists in large settlements. It is also able to live in the psammic biotope in a manner similar to Microparasellids. The females lay only 6 to 10 normal sized eggs. There is no indication of oostegits outside the breeding period. In some populations, the small number of eggs, correlated with the small size, seems to be compensated by a sex-ratio favorable so the females.

Eyed Cave Fish in a Karst Window, 2000, Espinasa, L. , Borowsky, R.
Caballo Moro, a karst window cave in northeastern Mexico, supports a mixed population of cave Astyanax mexicanus: eyed and eyeless. The relationships of these sub-populations to one another and to other populations of Mexican tetras were examined using RAPD DNA fingerprint markers. The eyed tetras of Caballo Moro Cave are genetically closer to blind tetras from Caballo Moro and other caves in the region than they are to eyed tetras from the surface. The two forms are not genetically identical, however, and may represent distinct sub-populations. Eyed and eyeless fish have a distributional bias in the cave, with eyed fish preferentially in the illuminated area and blind fish in the dark zone. Aggression of eyed towards blind fish in the illuminated area contributes to this bias and may serve to stabilize the eye-state polymorphism. We considered four hypotheses for the origin of Caballo Moro eyed cave fish. The RAPD data rule out that the mixed population represents a transitional stage of evolution, or that the eyed fish are unmodified surface immigrants. We cannot rule out that the eyed fish are the direct descendants of surface fish that have acquired markers from blind fish by hybridization, although the apparent distinctness of the two sub-populations suggests otherwise. An alternative hypothesis, that the eyed fish of the cave are direct descendants of blind cave fish that re-acquired eyes with the opening of the karst window, is consistent with the data and tentatively accepted.

Superficial subterranean habitats gateway to the subterranean realm, 2008, Culver, David C And Tanja Pipan.
Superficial subterranean habitats (SSHs) include small drainages that emerge as seeps (hypotelminorheic), small cavities in the uppermost part of karstified rock (epikarst), talus slopes (milieu souterrain superficiel), and cracks and shallow tubes in lava. They share only two important features with better known subterranean habitats, especially caves they are aphotic environments and they harbour a fauna modified for subterranean life, including species that are eyeless and without pigment. The occupants and environmental characteristics of these habitats are reviewed. The presence of troglomorphic species in SSHs suggests that the absence of light is the primary selective factor in the evolution of the distinctive morphology of cave animals, and that species in SSHs might have given rise to species in deeper subterranean habitats such as caves.

A new eyeless species of cave-dwelling trechine beetle from northeastern Guizhou Province, China (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae: Trechinae), 2012, Tian Mingyi, Clarke Arthur

Qianaphaenops emersoni n. sp. is described from Gan Dong, a limestone cave in Yanhe Xian, northeastern Guizhou Province, China. Likely to be a narrow range endemic species, Q. emersoni is only known from two almost adjacent type locality sites in Gan Dong cave. Q. emersoni is the fifth species to be described in this genus of eyeless troglobitic trechine beetles, known only from caves in northeastern Guizhou; a distributional map of the genus Qianaphaenops Uéno is provided. Q. emersoni belongs to the Qianaphaenops tenuis species group which contains two described species: Q. tenuis and Q. rotundicollis (Uéno, 2000). Q. emersoni is very similar to Q. rotundicollis Uéno, but easily distinguished from the latter by its broader head and elytra, narrower pronotum and its more elongate and slender aedeagus. Some explanation of the exploration of Gan Dong is provided, along with habitat details of the trechine beetle Type Locality sites located approximately 950 metres into the cave. The subsequent discovery of an efflux cave, presumed to be the Gan Dong Resurgence, is also discussed.


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