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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That isotropic mass is a mass having the same property or properties in all directions [22].?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for history of science (Keyword) returned 6 results for the whole karstbase:
Abstract: Darwin and Diprotodon: The Wellington Cave Fossils and the Law of Succession IN: Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales 104, 1980 for 1979:265-272, 1981, Dugan, Kathleen G.

The fossils from Wellington Caves, some of them 'giant', are well known to Australian speleologists, finds of importance for the study of Australian fauna from early discovered caves. What I think we did not appreciate was that the Wellington 'bones' have a place in the world history of science of significance also, the theme of this paper. Many of you will have watched the BBC-TV series on 'The Voyage of the Beagle'; much was made of the importance to Darwin in developing his theory of evolution of the fossils he found in southern South America. There fossils of giant relatives of sloths, llamas and armadillos helped to make clear to him the notion of the geological succession of life, a basic part of his theory along with the idea of natural selection to which the finches and the tortoises of the Galapagos Islands proved crucial. However it seems that Darwin was previously aware of the similar significance of the Wellington Caves bones for the law of succession from Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology which quotes William Clift's identifications of dasyures, wombats and kangaroos amongst them. The fact that these recently extinct animals were closely related to the distinctive modern marsupial fauna of Australia counted much against earlier conceptions such as Cuvier's catastrophic theory or Buckland's ideas of successive divine creations within a short time span. Watchers of the TV series will remember the devious role played by the palaeontologist, Sir Richard Owen, in organising public opposition to Darwin at the famous Oxford meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. This article relates the series of rearguard actions of Owen to maintain that there was a fossil elephant component in the ancient Australian fauna, damaging to Darwinism. But the growing evidence from Australia, not all of it from caves, of course, finally extinguished this red herring, started by that doctrinaire N.S.W. colonial, the Reverend John Dunmore Lang.


Introduction une histoire des tudes karstiques, 1990, Renault, Ph.
History of speleo-karstology: an introduction - Before any historical study, it seems important to recall some general notions, studied in recent publications. History of sciences does not limit itself to a repertory of events or to statistics, even when those matters give the basic and main notions. It traces back the evolution of a thought acting upon nature. The historico-critical analysis shows that the noticed trajectories are irregular and moved by crisis for instance with Newton, Lavoisier, Einstein correspond to theory conflicts. Bachelard, Khun, Piaget, etc., bring the analytic elements particularly the notion of paradigm explaining the constant readjustments of scientific system. History of science, behind the stories, must identify the elements of epistemology, which explains the successive points of view of a discipline.

Le gographe chinois Xu Xiake, un prcurseur de la karstologie et de la splologie, 1993, Cai Z. , Yang W. , Maire R.
Xu Xiake (1587-1641), the Chinese explorer and geographer, began in 1637 an astonishing four-year long journey in southwest China. Xu Xiake travels, written as a diary, is made up of 600 000 chinese letters: it is a geographical encyclopaedia belonging to the ancient masterpieces of China. Descriptions of the karstic geomorphology amount to more than 100 000 letters, that is to say the equivalent of 250 pages. He visited 288 karstic caves and described 22 types of karstic landforms. Xu Xiakes contribution to the study of the subterranean world is extremely valuable: deposits, underground rivers and lakes, climate, source of water, exploitation of the caves by humans and exploration techniques.

Ladoption du terme de karst en France, approche historique dun processus lexical dcisif, 1999, Gauchon, Christophe
During the symposium ALCADI 96 in Postojna, professor Yvan GAMS appealed to all the participants to study the way in which the notion of "Karst" had been introduced into respective countries and adopted by speleologists and geographers. In France, the specific phenomenons of the eponymic Karst, as the Zirknitz Lake (Cerknisko Jezero), have been known about and described since the end of the 16th century. But it required a big step to go from these descriptions to an understanding that the Karst might be a model capable of explaining the hydrology and morphology of such regions. In the early 19th century, naturalists and geologists began to recognise the particularities of the hydrography in limestone regions, and went as far as to propose the Jura or the Causses as models. In 1879, probably for the first lime, Marius Bouvier, a French civil engineer, used Karst as a pattern to explain and describe the impluvium of the famous Vaucluse spring (Provence). It is known that E.-A. Martel disliked this word of "karst" and argued strongly in favour of "causse"; but despite this, Cvijic was generally considered most representative, and Karst was quickly adopted for all the scientific french works.

KARST RESEARCH IN SERBIA BEFORE THE TIME OF JOVAN CVIJIĆ, 2007, Ć, AliĆ, J.

Although contributions by Jovan Cvijić are the most significant karstological work in the history of science in Serbia, the re­searchers of Serbian karst before the time of Cvijić are worth mentioning as well. Their karstological notes are usually parts of much more extensive works in the form of travel-records or landscape monographs. Most notes are related to caves, with only scarce mentioning of karst surface features. The descrip­tive character of the texts is dominant, although there are also some general remarks on hydrological functioning of karst (ponor-spring connections, role of water in formation of spe­leothem, etc.). Several authors can be singled out: foreign trav­ellers and scientists Otto von Pirch, Ami Boué and Felix Kanitz, while among the Serbian authors, it is necessary to mention Milan Đ. Milićević, Jovan Žujović and Cvijić’s teacher Vladimir Karić. All of them featured as an introduction to the scientific karstological work which followed at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century.


Hhlendunkel und Wissbegierde - Eine Kulturgeschichte der Hhlenforschung in Europa von der Antike bis zur Romantik, 2012, Mattes, J.
On the basis of the constructivist culture theory the traditional research interests of the history of science were renewed in the 1990ies. The article bases upon an oral presentation at the Austrian Society for the History of Science. In contrast to the dominating micro historic studies in the history of speleology, the paper provides an overview of the human activity in caves from ancient world to the beginning of the 19th century. This includes not only the scientific study of caves, but also sightseeing tours, the investigation and opening of caves undertaken by scientific laymen. The focus doesnt lie on single explorers and their attainments, but concentrates on the changes in the perception and interpretation of the underground cavities as well as on the practice of the visitors and explorers. The results show an intimate correlation between the scientific and cultural discourses to the interior of the earth. The people in the antiquity and Middle Ages interpreted caves as sexualized areas, which refer to social taboos. Simultaneously caves were used for protection and as a place for religious meditations. During the Baroque period they became the location of bizarre objects, admiring promenades and aristocratic celebrations. In the Romantic period the netherworld was seen as an area of inwardness and edification. Geologists and paleontologists discovered them as archives of natural history; artists recognized caves as areas of spiritual revelation, where ancient myths were updated.

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