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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That preadapted is possessing adaptations that would contribute to survival in a habitat other than the immediate one because of similarities in living conditions in the two habitats. insects that live in leaf litter on the forest floor, for example, may be pre-adapted to cave life [23].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for irish (Keyword) returned 28 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 28
Irish Limestone Regions and Caves, 1948, Coleman J. C.

Vertical Development in some Irish Caves, 1955, Tratman E. K.

Irish Biological Records Centre Report for the British Cave Research Association, 1974, Crichton M.

The Fauna found in some Irish Caves, 1974, Hazleton M.

Irish Vice-County Records of Fauna from the Hypogean and related zones of Caves and Wells in Ireland, 1974, Hazleton M.

A Check list of the Irish Cave Fauna: Troglobite, Troglophile and Trogloxene, 1974, Hazleton M.

Notes on the Irish Cave sites from which Fauna has been collected, 1974, Tratman E. K. , Hazleton M.

A pre-Pliocene or Pliocene land surface in County Galway, Ireland, 1997, Coxon P, Coxon C,
This paper describes a site on the Carboniferous limestone of County Galway, Ireland, where a complex of gorges, cave passages and shallow surface depressions is filled with organic silt and clay overlain by white quartz sand. The dating of the biogenic deposits to the Late Pliocene by biostratigraphical means provides a record of this largely undocumented period of Irish geological history. However, the particular importance of this site is that unlike other Irish karst infills, it represents not just the localized preservation of material in a closed depression but evidence of a more widespread cover of sediments suggesting the preservation of a Pliocene or pre-Pliocene land surface. This implies that glacial action throughout the Pleistocene has resulted in relatively little bedrock erosion in this region and raises the possibility that the present day landscape of the western Irish limestone lowlands may retain influences of preglacial karstification

Symposium Abstract: The reconstructon of the Palaeoclimate of the late Quaternary warm periods through Tims U/Th and Pollen analysis of British and Irish Speleothems, 1998, Mcgarry S.

Mapping groundwater vulnerability: the Irish perspective, 1998, Daly D, Warren Wp,
The groundwater protection scheme used in the Republic of Ireland since the 1980s had not encompassed the vulnerability mapping concept. Yet internationally, vulnerability maps were becoming an essential part of groundwater protection schemes and a valuable tool in environmental management. Consequently, following a review of protection schemes world-wide, the scheme used in Ireland was updated and amended to include vulnerability maps as a crucial component of the scheme. The approach taken to vulnerability assessments and mapping in the Republic of Ireland has been dictated by the following fundamental questions: Vulnerability of what? Vulnerability to what? Which factors determine the degree of vulnerability? What is the appropriate scale for map production? How can limitations and uncertainties be taken into account? How can vulnerability assessments be integrated into environmental and resource management? The following decisions were made: (i) we should map the vulnerability of groundwater, not aquifers or wells/springs; (ii) the position in the groundwater system specified to be of interest is the water-table (i.e. first groundwater encountered) in either sand/gravel aquifers or in bedrock; (iii) we should map the vulnerability of groundwater to contaminants generated by human activities (natural impacts are a separate issue); (iv) as the main threat to groundwater in Ireland is posed by point sources, we should map the vulnerability of groundwater to contaminants released at 1-2 m below the ground surface; (v) the characteristics of individual contaminants should not be taken into account; (vi) the natural geological and hydrogeological factors that determine vulnerability are the sub-soils above the watertable, the recharge type (whether point or diffuse) and, in sand/gravels, the thickness of the unsaturated zone; (vii) based on these factors, four vulnerability categories are used (extreme, high, moderate and low); (viii) map scales of 1:50 000 and 1:10 000 are preferred; (ix) limitations and uncertainties are indicated by appropriate wording on the maps and a disclaimer; (x) vulnerability maps should be incorporated into groundwater protection schemes, which should be used in decision-making on the location and control of potentially polluting developments. Vulnerability maps have now been produced for a number of local authority areas. They are an important part of county groundwater protection schemes as they provide a measure of the likelihood of contamination, assist in ensuring that protection schemes are not unnecessarily restrictive of human economic activity, help in the choice of engineering preventative measures, and enable major developments, which have a significant potential to contaminate, to be located in areas of relatively low vulnerability and therefore of relatively low risk, from a groundwater perspective

Symposium Poster: Subfossil amphibian and reptile faunas from British and Irish caves, 2000, Gleedowen C. P.

Groundwater protection zone delineation at a large karst spring in western Ireland, 2000, Deakin J,
Pouladower Spring is a large karst spring in County Clare, Ireland which is being considered for use as a public supply. Groundwater protection zones have been delineated as a water quality management strategy for the spring. The Irish national groundwater protection scheme methodology is adapted to take account of the hydrological and hydrogeological complexities of the karst regime. The catchment area for the spring is large (approximately 380 km2) and comprises the zones of contribution for two major outlets of water, the spring and the River Fergus. The actual zone of contribution to the spring varies with different water level conditions and the risk to the source from any point within the catchment, at any given time, is less than that for a conventional groundwater source. The catchment area is highly vulnerable, but dilution and sedimentation occurring in the lakes up gradient of the source, the high throughput, and the contribution from fissures outside the main flow conduits have helped maintain good water quality at the spring. The source is considered to be a combination of both groundwater and surface water as they are intricately inter-linked throughout the catchment. An Inner Protection Area is delineated which does not provide the 100-days travel time to the source required by the national scheme, as this would be impractically large and over-protective. Rather, it delineates the area of highest hydrogeological risk to the source and should allow the local authority sufficient time to act in the event of an accidental spill. A certain degree of microbial contamination is inevitable in a karst regime and treatment is essential, as it would be for a surface water source. The remainder of the catchment is classed as an Outer Protection Area. These protection areas are then combined with the vulnerability in a GIS to give groundwater protection zones which will be used by the planners, in conjunction with groundwater protection responses, to control potentially contaminating activities

Groundwater protection in a Celtic region: the Irish example, 2000, Misstear Bruce D. , Daly Donal,
One of the key environmental objectives of the proposed EU Water Framework Directive is that Member States must prevent the deterioration of groundwater quality. A national groundwater protection scheme for Ireland has been published recently. This scheme shows certain broad similarities to the groundwater protection policy for England and Wales, incorporating the concepts of groundwater vulnerability, source protection zones and responses to potentially polluting activities. However, the Irish scheme is different in several important respects, reflecting the different hydrogeological conditions and pollution concerns in Ireland. Some of these hydrogeological conditions and pollution concerns are common to the other Celtic regions. A major feature of the Irish scheme is the importance given to subsoil permeability in defining groundwater vulnerability. At present, the subsoil permeability is classified in qualitative terms as high, moderate or low. For the protection scheme to be defensible, it is essential to adopt a systematic and consistent approach for assigning subsoil units to these permeability categories. In mapping groundwater vulnerability, it is also useful to take account of secondary indicators such as groundwater recharge potential, natural and artificial drainage density and vegetation characteristics. Another important issue in Ireland is the protection of groundwater in karst areas, since these areas are especially vulnerable to contamination

Calcite Fabrics, Growth Mechanisms, and Environments of Formation in Speleothems from the Italian Alps and Southwestern Ireland, 2000, Frisia S, Borsato A, Fairchild Ij, Mcdermott F,
Five fabrics were identified in Alpine and Irish caves on the basis of morphological and microstructural characteristics, and related to growth mechanisms and growth environment. Columnar and fibrous fabrics grow when speleothems are continuously wet, and from fluids at near-equilibrium conditions (low supersaturation; SIcc < 0.35), through the screw dislocation mechanism. The highly defective microcrystalline fabrics form at the same supersaturation range as columnar fabric but under variable discharge and the presence of growth inhibitors. Dendritic fabrics, which have the highest density of crystal defects, develop in disequilibrium conditions (high supersaturation) under periodic very low-flow-regime periods that result in prolonged outgassing. Cave calcareous tufa forms in disequilibrium conditions. Only the calcite crystals of fabrics formed at low supersaturation seem to precipitate near-isotopic-equilibrium conditions

Palynological evidence for Mesozoic karst at Piltown, Co. Kilkenny, 2000, Higgs K. T. , Jones G. L. ,
Exploration drilling by Pasminco Australia Ltd. in 1993 at Piltown near Carrick-on-Suir. encountered brown. yellow and fawn clays of the Piltown Clay Formation (new name) lying on and in Carboniferous limestone. Palynological analysis of these clays indicates that they are late Jurassic to early Cretaceous in age. The palynomorphs are well preserved but not abundant. They consist mostly of terrestrially derived spores and pollen grains, though the rare occurrence of dinoflagellate cysts indicates a weak marine influence in some of the sediments. The presence of these Mesozoic sediments within karstified limestone implies an active karat system before and/or during late Jurassic-early Cretaceous times in south County Kilkenny

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