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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That submarine karst is karst topography developed below the tidal zone. see also subaqueous karst.?

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Your search for ligand (Keyword) returned 2 results for the whole karstbase:
Kinetics and mechanisms of precipitation of calcite as affected by P-CO2 and organic ligands at 25 degrees C, 1998, Lebron I. , Suarez D. L. ,
This study was conducted to develop a model for the precipitation rate of calcite under varying CO2 partial pressures and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOG). Precipitation rates of calcite were measured in solutions with supersaturation values (Omega) between 1 and 20 and in the presence of 2 m(2)L(-1) of calcite. Experiments were run at partial pressures of CO2 (P-CO2) in the range of 0.035-10 kPa and DOC concentrations in the range of 0.02-3.50 mM. The effects of these two variables were quantified separately for the precipitation mechanisms of crystal growth and heterogeneous nucleation. We found an increase in precipitation rate (at constant Omega) when P-CO2 increased. For constant Omega, we also found a linear relationship between calcite precipitation rate and activity of CaHCO3, indicating that CaHCO3 species have an active role in the mechanism of calcite precipitation. These findings suggest that the increase in the precipitation rate with higher P-CO2 levels is likely caused by the increase in the negative charge on the calcite surface together with an increase in the activity of CaHCO3 species in solution. The mechanism of inhibition of calcite crystal growth by organic ligands has been shown to be surface coating of the crystals by DOG. The amount of DOC adsorbed on the surface of the calcite crystals follows a Langmuir isotherm for all the P-CO2 levels studied; however, the amount of DOC necessary to inhibit calcite precipitation increased. With increasing P-CO2, the negative charge on the crystal increases, which affects crystal growth, but also these increases in P-CO2 cause a decrease in the solution pH and increase in the ionic strength for constant Omega. Solution pH and ionic strength affect the structure and degree of dissociation of the organic functional groups, which in turn affects the and DOC concentration on the inhibition of crystal growth and heterogeneous nucleation. The effect of P-CO2 and DOC concentration on the precipitation rate of calcite is expressed in a precipitation rate model which reflects the contributions of crystal growth and heterogeneous nucleation. Copyright (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd

Origin and Significance of Postore Dissolution Collapse Breccias Cemented with Calcite and Barite at the Meikle Gold Deposit, Northern Carlin Trend, Nevada, 2003, Emsbo P, Hofstra Ah,
The final event in a complicated hydrothermal history at the Meikle gold deposit was gold deficient but caused extensive postore dissolution of carbonate, collapse brecciation, and precipitation of calcite and barite crystals in the resulting cavities. Although previously interpreted to be part of the Carlin-type hydrothermal system, crosscutting relationships and U-Th-Pb geochronology constrain this hydrothermal event to late Pliocene time (ca. 2 Ma), nearly 36 Ma after ore formation. Mineralogic, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope data indicate that postore hydrothermal fluids were reduced, H2S-rich, unevolved meteoric waters ({delta}18O = -17{per thousand}) of low temperature (ca. 65{degrees}C). The{delta} 18O values of barite and calcite indicate that these minerals were in isotopic equilibrium, requiring that barite SO4 was derived from the oxidation of reduced sulfur; however, preexisting sulfides in breccia cavities were not oxidized. The{delta} 34S (15{per thousand}) values of barite are higher than those of local bulk sulfide and supergene alunite indicating that SO4 was not derived from supergene oxidation of local sulfide minerals. The 15 per mil {delta}34S value suggests that the H2S in the fluids may have been leached from sulfur-rich organic matter in the local carbonaceous sedimentary rocks. A reduced H2S-rich fluid is also supported by the bright cathodoluminescence of calcite which indicates that it is Mn rich and Fe poor. Calcite has a narrow range of {delta}13C values (0.3-1.8{per thousand}) that are indistinguishable from those of the host Bootstrap limestone, indicating that CO2 in the fluid was from dissolution of the local limestone. These data suggest that dissolution and brecciation of the Bootstrap limestone occurred where H2S-rich fluids encountered more oxidizing fluids and formed sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Intense fracturing in the mine area by previous structural and hydrothermal events probably provided conduits for the descent of oxidized surface water which mixed with the underlying H2S-rich waters to form the dissolving acid. The surface-derived fluid apparently contained sufficient oxygen to produce H2SO4 from H2S but not enough to alter pyrite to Fe oxide. Although H2S is an important gold-transporting ligand, the temperature was too low to transport a significant amount of gold. The presence of analogous calcite- and barite-lined cavities in other Carlin-type deposits suggests that the generation (and oxidation) of H2S-rich meteoric waters was a common phenomenon in north-central Nevada. Previous sulfur isotope studies have also shown that the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks were the principal source of H2S in Devonian sedimentary exhalative-type, Jurassic intrusion-related, Eocene Carlin-type, and Miocene low-sulfidation gold deposits in the region. The similar sulfur source in all of these systems suggests that basin brines, magmatic fluids, and meteoric waters all evolved to be H2S-rich ore fluids by circulation through Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. Thus, although not directly related to gold mineralization, the recent hydrologic history of the deposit provides important clues to earlier ore-forming processes that were responsible for gold mineralization

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