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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That formation stabilizer is a sand or gravel placed in the annulus of the well between the borehole wall and the well screen to provide temporary or long-term support for the borehole [6].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

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Your search for mammalia (Keyword) returned 22 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 22
On the Geology of the Western States of North America, 0000, Owen David Dale,
The remarks here submitted will be confined chiefly to that part of the Western States of North America watered by the rivers Ohio, Wabash, Illinois, Rock, Wisconsin, Cumberland and Tennessee, lying between the 35th and 43rd degree of N. latitude and the 81st and 91st of W. longitude. The district includes the states of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and the Du Buque and Mineral Point districts of Iowa and Wisconsin. This territory occupies an area of about half a million of square miles, but its geological features are remarkably uniform, belonging, with a few partial exceptions, to the periods of the bituminous coal and carboniferous limestone as found in Europe, and the Silurian rocks as described by Sir R. Murchison; the exceptions are the superficial deposits which occasionally cover up these from view over considerable tracts, and these must either be referred to the age of gigantic mammalia and formations of a much newer date, or belong to a marl and greensand found in the western district of Tennessee, probably a portion of the greensand and other members of the cretaceous group. A general idea of the geological formations of the whole tract may be obtained from the annexed diagram. ... This 250-word extract was created in the absence of an abstract

The Discovery, Exploration and Scientific Investigation of the Wellington Caves, New South Wales, 1963, Lane Edward A. , Richards Aola M.

Although research has been unable to establish a definite date of discovery for the limestone caves at Wellington, New South Wales, documentary evidence has placed it as 1828. The actual discovery could have been made earlier by soldiers or convicts from the Wellington Settlement, which dated from 1823. Whether the aborigines knew of the cave's existence before 1828 is uncertain, but likely, as in 1830 they referred to them as "Mulwang". A number of very small limestone caves were also discovered about the same time in the nearby Molong area. The Bungonia Caves, in the Marulan district near Goulburn, were first written about a short time later. On all the evidence available at present, the Wellington Caves can be considered to be the first of any size discovered on the mainland of Australia. The Wellington Caves are situated in a low, limestone outcrop about six miles south by road from the present town of Wellington, and approximately 190 miles west-north-west of Sydney. They are at an altitude of 1000 feet, about half a mile from the present bed of the Bell River, a tributary of the Macquarie River. One large cave and several small caves exist in the outcrop, and range in size from simple shafts to passages 200 to 300 feet long. Mining for phosphate has been carried out, resulting in extensive galleries, often unstable, at several levels. Two caves have been lit by electricity for the tourist trades; the Cathedral Cave, 400 feet long, maximum width 100 feet, and up to 50 feet high; and the smaller Gaden Cave. The Cathedral Cave contains what is believed to be the largest stalagmite in the world, "The Altar", which stands on a flat floor, is 100 feet round the base and almost touches the roof about 40 feet above. It appears that the name Cathedral was not applied to the cave until this century. The original names were "The Great Cave", "The Large Cave" or "The Main Cave". The Altar was named by Thomas Mitchell in 1830. See map of cave and Plate. Extensive Pleistocene bone deposits - a veritable mine of bone fragments - were found in 1830, and have been studied by palaeontologists almost continually ever since. These bone deposits introduced to the world the extinct marsupials of Australia, and have a special importance in view of the peculiar features of the living fauna of the continent. The names of many famous explorers and scientists are associated with this history, among the most prominent being Sir Thomas Mitchell and Sir Richard Owen. Anderson (1933) gives a brief outline of why the Wellington Caves fossil bone beds so rapidly attracted world-wide interest. During the 18th and early 19th Century, the great palaeontologist, Baron Georges Cuvier, and others, supposed that the earth had suffered a series of catastrophic changes in prehistoric times. As a result of each of these, the animals living in a certain area were destroyed, the area being repopulated from isolated portions of the earth that had escaped the catastrophe. The Bilical Deluge was believed to have been the most recent. Darwin, during the voyage of the Beagle around the world (1832-37), was struck by the abundance of Pleistocene mammalian fossils in South America, and also by the fact that, while these differed from living forms, and were in part of gigantic dimensions, they were closely related to present-day forms in that continent. Darwin's theory of descent with modification did not reconcile with the ideas of Cuvier and others. As the living mammalian fauna of Australia was even more distinctive than that of South America, it was a matter of importance and excitement to discover the nature of the mammals which had lived in Australia in the late Tertiary and Pleistocene.


Sporomorphs From The Dessicated Carcases of Mammals From Thylacine Hole, Western Australia, 1969, Ingram, B. S.

Assemblages of sporomorphs have been recovered from the gut content of dessicated mammalian carcases of ages estimated up to 5,000 years BP, found in Thylacine Hole, a cave in the Eucla Basin. These assemblages suggest the animals lived in an area of vegetation similar to that existing around the cave at present.


The Pleistocene Mammalian Fauna of Harrodsburg Crevice, Monroe County, Indiana, 1978, Parmalee Paul W. , Munson Patrick J. , Guilday John E.

Additional Comments on the Pleistocene Mammalian Fauna of Harrodsburg Crevice, Montroe County, Indiana, 1980, Munson Patrick J. , Parmalee Paul W. , Guilday John E.

Paleoecological Implications of the Mammalian Fauna of Lower Sloth Cave Guadalupe Mountains, Texas, 1983, Logan, Lloyd E.

Die Zweifarbfledermaus (Vespertilio murinus Linnaeus, 1758) in sterreich - Mammalia austriaca 7)., 1984, Spitzenberger, F(rederike).
[Drachenhhle (2839/1), Puxerlueg, Dachstein-Sdwandhhle (1543/28), Eisriesenwelt (1511/24), Fundaufzhlung nach Bundeslndern]

Die Zweifarbfledermaus (Vespertilio murinus Linnaeus, 1758) in sterreich - Mammalia austriaca 7), 1984, Spitzenberger, F.

RECOGNITION OF MICROCLIMATE ZONES THROUGH RADON MAPPING, LECHUGUILLA CAVE, CARLSBAD-CAVERNS-NATIONAL-PARK, NEW-MEXICO, 1991, Cunningham Ki, Larock Ej,
Radon concentrations range from < 185 to 3,515 Bq m-3 throughout Lechuguilla Cave, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico. Concentrations in the entrance passages and areas immediately adjacent to these passages are controlled by outside air temperature and barometric pressure, similar to other Type 2 caves. Most of the cave is developed in three geographic branches beneath the entrance passages; these areas maintain Rn levels independent of surface effects, an indication that Rn levels in deep, complex caves or mines cannot be simply estimated by outside atmospheric parameters. These deeper, more isolated areas are subject to convective ventilation driven by temperature differences along the 477-m vertical extent of the cave. Radon concentrations are used to delineate six microclimate zones (air circulation cells) throughout the cave in conjunction with observed airflow data. Suspected surface connections contribute fresh air to remote cave areas demonstrated by anomalous Rn lows surrounded by higher values, the presence of mammalian skeletal remains, CO2 concentrations and temperatures lower than the cave mean, and associated surficial karst features

Distribution and Abundance of Bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera) in Coastal Plain Caves of Southern Alabama, 1992, Best Troy L. , Carey Steven D. , Caesar Katherine G. , Henry Travis Hill

The Pleistocene Ma U’Oi cave, northern Vietnam: palaeontology, sedimentology and palaeoenvironments, 2004, Bacon Am, Demeter F, Schuster M, Long Vt, Thuy Nk, Antoine Po, Sen S, Nga Hh, Huong Nm,
In November 2001, a Vietnamese-French team undertook the excavation of the Ma U’Oi cave in northern Vietnam. This limestone karst cave is located in the province of Hoa Binh, 70 km ESE from Hanoi and is typical of the northern Vietnam landscape. The site yielded an in situ mammalian fauna of a relatively modern composition. We also found a mixed fauna with a lower molar attributed to an archaic Homo (Demeter et al., in press). We estimate the age of Ma U’Oi fauna between 169 kyr, the age of Thum Wiman Nakin (Esposito et al., 1998) estimated by U/Th method and 80-60 kyr, the biochronological age of Lang Trang (Long et al., 1996), or even Holocene. The Ma U’Oi site is important because of the scarcity of Vietnamese sites of those particular levels. For that reason, it fills a gap in the biostratigraphy of Vietnam and permits new correlations with other sites of the mainland, especially those well documented from Thailand

Environmental change across the Early-Middle Pleistocene transition: small mammalian evidence from the Trinchera Dolina cave, Atapuerca, Spain, 2005, Cuencabescos G, Rofes J, Garciapimienta J,
The sites of Atapuerca are well known for their hominin-bearing localities of Early to Middle Pleistocene age. Trinchera Dolina yields western Europe's oldest fossil hominin, the 850 ka Homo antecessor; and at Sima de los Huesos there occurs the best collection of the Middle Pleistocene hominin Homo heidelbergensis. However, small mammals (Rodentia, Insectivora, Chiroptera and Lagomorpha) represent the largest number of species and greatest fossil abundance in the deposits of the Atapuerca cave complex. The small mammals are grouped by habitat categories, but because the ecology of mammals is complex, we base our study on the evolution of these categories throughout the sequence. The assemblage distribution at the Trinchera Dolina site reflects landscape and environmental changes during the past million years. Shifts between woodland, open land and moorland are indicated by the relative abundance of species based on diagnostic elements such as first lower molars. These data are combined with the distribution of large mammals, pollen, sediments and geological context of the Trinchera Dolina site. From this interdisciplinary approach, we conclude that the first hominins from western Europe (Homo antecessor) lived during a warm, wet and wooded interval, probably corresponding to Marine Isotope Stages 21 to 19. The transition from Early to Middle Pleistocene at Atapuerca is characterized by palaeoenvironmental changes recorded between levels TD5-6 and TD8-10, respectively. The general opening of the landscape at the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene could have favoured the dispersal of hominins (Homo heidelbergensis) across western Europe

FOSSIL VERTEBRATES AND PALEOMAGNETISM UPDATE OF ONE OF THE EARLIER STAGES OF CAVE EVOLUTION IN THE CLASSICAL KARST, SLOVENIA: PLIOCENE OF ČRNOTIČE II SITE AND RAČIŠKA PEČINA CAVE, 2007, HorÁ, Č, Ek I. , Mihevc A. , Zupan Hajna N. , Pruner P. , BosÁ, K P.

For the first time in the Classical Karst, paleontological data enabled to match the magnetostratigraphic record precisely with the geomagnetic polarity timescale in two studied sites: (i) a series of speleothems alternating with red clays in Račiška pečina Cave (Matarsko podolje), and (ii) an unroofed paleocave of the Črnotiče II site (Podgorski kras Plateau) completely filled by fluvial clastic sediments covered by speleothems. The later sites are also characterized by a rich appearance of fossil tubes of autochthonous stygobiont serpulid Marifugia cavatica. The vertebrate record is composed mostly of enamel fragments of rodents and soricomorphs. Absence of rootless arvicolids as well as taxonomic composition of the mammalian fauna suggests the Pliocene age of both sites. For (i) Račiška pečina (with Apodemus, cf. Borsodia) it was estimated to middle to late MN17 (ca 1.8–2.4 Ma), while (ii) the assemblage from Črnotiče II (with Deinsdorfia sp., Beremedia fissidens, Apodemus cf. atavus, Rhagapodemus cf. frequens, Glirulus sp., Cseria sp.) is obviously quite older: MN15–MN16 (ca 3.0–4.1 Ma). In respect to congruence of biostratigraphic and paleomagnetic data and a reliable sedimentary setting of the samples we propose to apply the respective datum also as the time of one ancient speleogenetic phase in the Classical Karst.


Neue Knochenfunde aus dem Moosschacht (2836/237) auf der Tanneben bei Semriach, Steiermark, 2007, Pacher, M.
Faunal remains from the Moosschacht collected in 2003 and 2004 are presented. Five mammalian species were identified but their chronological position remains unclear. Judging from their preservation, the bones are classified as fossil or subfossil remains. Evidence of row deer and the rather small size of the red deer bones point to an accumulation of the remains during a warm period after the Late Glacial Maximum, while marmot remains indicate a colder period of time.

Microscopic fungi isolated from the Domica Cave system (Slovak Karst National Park, Slovakia). A review, 2009, Novakova A.
A broad spectrum, total of 195 microfungal taxa, were isolated from various cave substrates (cave air, cave sediments, bat droppings and/or guano, earthworm casts, isopods and diplopods faeces, mammalian dung, cadavers, vermiculations, insect bodies, plant material, etc.) from the cave system of the Domica Cave (Slovak Karst National Park, Slovakia) using dilution, direct and gravity settling culture plate methods and several isolation media. Penicillium glandicola, Trichoderma polysporum, Oidiodendron cerealis, Mucor spp., Talaromyces flavus and species of the genus Doratomyces were isolated frequently during our study. Estimated microfungal species diversity was compared with literature records from the same substrates published in the past.

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