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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That specific discharge is the rate of discharge of ground water per unit area of a porous medium measured at right angle to the direction of flow. synonyms: darcy velocity; seepage velocity.?

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Your search for manganese oxides (Keyword) returned 7 results for the whole karstbase:
Bacterial Deposition of Iron and Manganese Oxides in North American Caves, 1986, Peck, Stewart B.

HALLOYSITE FROM KARST SEDIMENTS OF THE KONEPRUSY AREA: EVIDENCE FOR ACID HYDROTHERMAL SPELEOGENESIS IN THE BOHEMIAN KARST, CZECH REPUBLIC, 2000, Melka K . , Suchy V. , Zeman A. , Bosak P . , Langrova A .

(Pre)-Cretaceous sediments that fill extensive hydrothermal dissolution cavities in Devonian limestones in the Certovy schody Quarry contain locally abundant halloysite clays. In most samples halloysite coexists with metahalloysite and kaolinite that form snowy-white and blue-green masses intimately intergrown with manganese oxides. The determination of members of kaolinite group minerals was the main purpose of this study. X-ray diffraction method and thermal analyses enabled to differentiate halloysite from metahalloysite and kaolinite. Tubular morphology of halloysite was observable in electron micrographs. A study of the stored material confirmed continuous transition from the halloysite form over interstratified states (mixed-layer halloysite-metahalloysite crystal structure) to metahalloysite. Field observations indicate that halloysite formed due to selective in situ hydrothermal alteration of clayey matrix of quartz sandstone and/or breccias of unclear original composition that occur within the sedimentary fill. The proposed model for halloysite formation involves alteration by warm (< 80°C) acid solutions that migrated through the system of tectonic fractures, dissolved limestone host and altered overlying sedimentary members that collapsed into the resulting hydrothermal depressions. Since halloysite partially replaced also Cenomanian sediments, the hydrothermal alteration must have occurred only during post-Cenomanian time.


Geomicrobiology of caves: A review, 2001, Northup D. E. , Lavoie K. H. ,
In this article, we provide a review of geomicrobiological interactions in caves, which are nutrient-limited environments containing a variety of redox interfaces. Interactions of cave microorganisms and mineral environments lead to the dissolution of, or precipitation on, host rock and speleothems (secondary mineral formations). Metabolic processes of sulfur-, iron-, and manganese-oxidizing bacteria can generate considerable acidity, dissolving cave walls and formations. Examples of possible microbially influenced corrosion include corrosion residues (e.g., Lechuguilla and Spider caves, New Mexico, USA), moonmilk from a number of caves (e.g., Spider Cave, New Mexico, and caves in the Italian Alps), and sulfuric acid speleogenesis and cave enlargement (e.g., Movile Cave, Romania, and Cueva de Villa Luz, Mexico). Precipitation processes in caves, as in surface environments, occur through active or passive processes. In caves, microbially induced mineralization is documented in the formation of carbonates, moonmilk, silicates, clays, iron and manganese oxides, sulfur, and saltpeter at scales ranging from the microscopic to landscape biokarst. Suggestions for future research are given to encourage a move from descriptive, qualitative studies to more experimental studies

Palaeolithic painting matter: natural or heat-treated pigment?, 2004, Chalmin E, Vignaud C, Menu M,
Analyses of archaeological materials attempt to rediscover the know-how of Prehistoric men by determining the nature of the matter, its preparation mode, and its geographic origin. The preparation mode of painting matter of Palaeolithic rock art consisted not only in mixing and grinding but also in heat-treatment. Palaeolithic painters used two main colors: red (iron oxide, hematite) and black (charcoal or manganese oxide). The different phases of manganese oxides can be distinguished using their elemental composition, their structure and the oxidation state of the Mn ion (II, III, IV). Their transformation during heat-treatment has been studied on mineralogical reference samples by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) either coupled or not with a heating stage (in situ). These studies have enabled us to understand the transformation mechanisms of manganese oxides and also to gain insights into the preparation procedures of painting materials during the Palaeolithic period. The painting samples studied in this paper come from the cave of Lascaux (Dordogne, France). These studies allow us to distinguish between natural or heat-treated manganese oxides

Geomicrobiology of cave ferromanganese deposits: A field and laboratory investigation, 2005, Spilde M. N. , Northup D. E. , Boston P. J. , Schelble R. T. , Dano K. E. , Crossey L. J. , Dahm C. N. ,
Unusual ferromanganese deposits are found in several caves in New Mexico. The deposits are enriched in iron and manganese by as much as three orders of magnitude over the bedrock, differing significantly in mineralogy and chemistry from bedrock-derived insoluble residue. The deposits contain metabolically active microbial communities. Enrichment cultures inoculated from the ferromanganese deposits produced manganese oxides that were initially amorphous but developed into crystalline minerals over an 8-month period and beyond; no such progression occurred in killed controls. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences from clone libraries constructed from culture DNA identified two genera known to oxidize manganese, but most clones represent previously unknown manganese oxidizers. We suggest that this community is breaking down the bedrock and accumulating iron and manganese oxides in an oligotrophic environment

The mineralogy and trace element chemistry of black manganese oxide deposits from caves, 2009, White W. B. , Vito C. , And Scheetz B. E.

Free surface streams in caves and their surface infeeders often contain pebbles and cobbles coated with black manganese oxide minerals. Coating thicknesses vary from fractions of a millimeter to a few millimeters. In addition, a few caves contain loose masses of black oxide material. The results reported here are based on examination of 39 specimens and detailed chemical analyses of 18 of them. Most of the coatings are amorphous to x-rays, with at best, only a few broad diffraction lines. Infrared spectroscopy shows that most of the specimens are birnessite, with evidence for romanechite, ranceite, and pyrolusite in a few specimens. All specimens contain both iron and manganese, but the Mn/Fe ratio varies widely. Many specimens are enriched in Ba but depleted in Sr. The manganese and iron oxides contain the transition metals Co, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn in concentrations greater than 0.5 wt% in some specimens. Minor Cr and Mo also occur. Given the extremely low concentrations of these elements expected in freshwater streams in carbonate terrains, the manganese oxides exert a dramatic amplifying effect over the expected background. Manganese oxides appear to act as a dosimeter for heavy metals in karst waters.


Uncommon cave minerals associated to hypogene speleogenesis in Southern France, 2013, Audra, Philippe

Five hypogenic-origin caves from Southern France are presented. Investigations using XRD, SEM and Raman spectroscopy, reveal the presence of uncommon cave minerals. Oilloki Cave is a small lead ore mine-cave containing galena, cerussite, and bismuth (present as native element or as sulfide).La Baume Cave is a hydrothermal breccia-pipe, filled with colorful (red, green, white) clays. Some of the clay minerals (clinochlore se-piolite), could originate from hydrothermal weathering of clastic material. The Mala-coste Quarry, harbors a hydrothermal chimney with enlarged vugs lined with calcite spar and filled with iron oxyhydroxides poolfingers (goethite-hematite) and manganese oxides (birnessite, todorokite). Deposition of iron and manganese oxides results of the pH-Eh evolution along the hydrothermal chimney. Pigette Cave is a hydrothermal ver-tical maze with calcite lining and small iron oxyhydroxides and manganese oxides mass-es. The hydrothermal weathering of the walls deposited grains of lithiophorite, barite, and celadonite, which could originate from glauconite. Baume Galinière Cave is a small horizontal maze originating from the oxidation of sulfide masses of pyrite. Beside the common byproducts (gypsum, goethite, sulfur), the six members of the jarosite sub-group are present: jarosite, ammoniojarosite, argentojarosite, hydronium jarosite, natro-jarosite, plumbojarosite, together with fibroferrite. In these caves, three minerals are new cave minerals (bismuth, celadonite, argentojarosite); some others have been men-tioned before only in a few caves worldwide (clinochlore, lithiophorite, ammoniojaro-site, hydronium jarosite, natrojarosite, plumbojarosite, fibroferrite). The mineralogene-sis involves different processes: (i) Deposition in mixing zone from species carried by rising deep flow (barite, galena, bismuth, birnessite, todorokite, lithiophorite); (ii) Hy-drothermal weathering of clay minerals contained in host rock or present as clastic sediments (clinochlore, sepiolite, celadonite); (iii) Oxidation of sulfide masses (goethite, cerussite, jarosite subgroup minerals, fibroferrite).


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