Community news

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That vegetation cover is the cover living vegetation on top of the upper soil horizon [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

What is Karstbase?

Search KARSTBASE:

keyword
author

Browse Speleogenesis Issues:

KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

Search in KarstBase

Your search for mountain karst (Keyword) returned 22 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 22
Grottes et karsts des environs de Chieng Mai (Thalande), 1983, Deharveng L. , Gouze A.
CAVES AND KARSTS OF CHIENG MA REGION (THAILAND) - This work gives the first observations about limestone areas near Chieng Ma (NW Thailand). We found 3 types of superficial karstic landscapes: hill-karsts, tower-karsts and tower-and-hangings-valleys mountain karsts. The latter only develops in special topographic conditions from 1500 to 2000m a.s.l., in Do Chieng Dao. The deep karst is always been surveyed. For example, we describe here Tham Chieng Dao, the longest cave in Thailand, with a development of 4850m.

Rsultats de deux traages dans l'amphithtre d'Ozania (Picos de Europa, Espagne), 1984, Fabre J. P. , Fabriol R.
RESULTS OF TWO WATER TRACINGS IN THE OZANIA AMPHITHEATRE (PICOS DE EUROPA, SPAIN) - The Picos de Europa is a high mountain karst with an underground flow organisation poorly known. Two water tracings with uranine have been carried out in the Ozania amphitheatre. These tracings have led to the identification of two separate systems: 900g of tracer injected in the Sima de Los Gorrinos emerged at the Fuente Prieta resurgence 20h later; 10kg of tracer injected in the Sima del Jou Luengu emerged at the Reo Molin and Dobra Seca resurgences 9 days later. The latter system appears to be the most interesting, due to its complexity and to the vast catchment.

Un exemple de karst haut-alpin : le Dsert de Plat (Haute-Savoie), 1984, Maire, R.
AN EXAMPLE OF HIGH ALPINE KARST: THE DSERT DE PLAT (HAUTE-SAVOIE) - Situated in the French Northern Alps between 1600m and 2800m elevation, the Dsert de Plat is characterised by a wet, cold and very snowy climate (P = 2400-2800 mm/year). We observe several morphoclimatic levels: the upper mountain karst (1500-1700m), the subalpine karst (1700-1950m), the alpine karst (1950 - 2600m) and the proglacial karst (well developed in the Haut-Giffre massif. Glacio-karstic landforms like cirque-dolines and pavements (Schichttreppenkarst) are inherited from the quaternary glaciations. The deep karst underlines the part of quaternary climatic sequence with complex drainage and fillings. Now, the karstic flow is a nival type (maximum during the spring and summer minimum) but the hydrochemical cycles are opposite (spring minimum). Nevertheless, because of a very abundant underground discharge during hot season (80%), the exported limestone reaches 75% of annual amount. The specific dissolution is strong (104 mm/ky), but it does not reach the optimum of forest mountain karst, like Vercors (120-170mm/ky).

Les massifs karstiques des Alpes occidentales, trame structurale et bioclimatique, 1984, Nicod, J.
THE KARSTIC MASSIFS OF WESTERN ALPS: structural and bioclimatic framework - The structural conditions determine several types of karst units: the northern Prealps (thrusts), the southern Jura (folded or tabular), the southern Prealps (faulted and folded plateaus), the complex land of Low Provence, and the high karsts of Inner Alps. The bioclimatic framework explains the altitudinal sequence of current processes. The value of the runoff, the part of the snow, and the biochemical parameters (vegetation, CO2), have particularly holded the attention. The specific dissolution reaches its maximum in the wooded mountain karsts. Heritages also determine the landforms (glacial, periglacial, terra-rossa).

Le karst de la Pierre Saint-Martin en quelques chiffres, 1985, Arsip
DATA ABOUT THE PIERRE SAINT-MARTIN KARST - The Pierre Saint-Martin mountain karst (150 km2) presents 150 caves deeper than 100 m. Synthesis data are given in hydrogeology and speleology with a list of the principal caves. The international association ARSIP manages the researches on the massif and prepares some publications

Prsentation splologique du massif des Fanges-Roc-Paradet (Aude/Pyrnes orientales), 1987, Ournie, B.
SPELEOLOGY OF THE FANGES-ROC PARADET MOUNTAIN KARST (AUDE /EASTERN PYRENEES, FRANCE) - The Fanges-Roc Paradet Mountain karst (S = 40 km2) contains a large underground cave, the " Cthulhu Dmoniaque-Puits de lEngoulevent " system (L = 13km, D = -302m). This region of Fenouilldes is characterized by a mediterranean climate and presents different surface karst features (pavements, depressions, dry valleys). Synthesis data are given in hydrogeology and speleology. The complexity of subterranean drainage and caves can be explained by an old karstification begun during the mio-pliocene uplift, from an eogene peneplain. The association Arkham co-ordinates the researches and prepares some publications.

Signification des remplissages des karsts de montagne, quelques cls lusage des splologues, 1995, Audra, P.
This paper is intended to cavers in order to help them identify the most significant mountain karst infillings. Carbonated varves sedimentation occurs during floodings in glacial environment. The varves block the deep parts of the networks. Pebbles sealings show a powerful erosion in the vadose zone, near glacial sinkholes. Gelifract spreadings are indicators of frost and snow action in periglacial environment. Reworked weathered rocks are the most ancient deposits, inherited from tertiary warm phases when karstification occurred under regolith covers. Their clearing is partly simultaneous with cave systems elaboration, in relation to the alpine uplift, during Pliocene. Speleothems are also warm or temperate climate indicators. Crystalline morphology reflects environmental characteristics, while their surface sight could have been smoothed during discharge reactivations. Finally, some infillings could have recorded neotectonic movements: broken speleothems, deformed clastic sediments, etc.

Les nomades lours du massif calcaire du Kuh-e-Garrin (Zagros central, Iran), 1997, Dumas, Dominique
Today many nomadic confederations live in the Zagros range. For a long time, these high mountains have offered these populations both shelter and a large territory which is not as arid as the piedmont plains due to orographic rainfall Whereas the Baxtyari and Qashqa are well described in the literature, little is known about the Lours nomads. In this paper, observations and investigations on nomadic families (Summers 1994, 1995, 1996) are presented together with the characteristics of their seasonal migrations. The socio-economic dimension of these populations is also studied to explain the reasons which account for the overgrazing clearly visible in all Zagros mountains. Today, these high mountain karsts are subject to a higher anthropogenic pressure than previously, which entails an irreversible disappearance of vegetation and soils.

Quelques mcanismes chimiques du creusement des cavernes (plus _particulirement pour ltude de la zone noye), 1999, Lismonde, Baudouin
The classical influences of physical parameters and mixing corrosion are presented to study the equilibrium of the water-air-limestone chemical system. The frequent observation of cave levels in the mountain karstic systems is often associated with the greater facility of dissolution, near the water table. Some chemical mechanisms are analysed to show the greater karst corrosion on this level. Increased air pressure induces an increase in the saturation pCO2 of the water. Two confinement coefficients are used to analyse the role of a limited quantity of air in contact with water. The first (k) is the water mass/water + air mass ratio, the second (kn) is the mass of CO2 in water/ mass of CO2 in water and air ratio. These two ratios show that the latter coefficient varies with air pressure, but is proportional to the varying pCO2.

Characteristics of karst ecosystems of Vietnam and their vulnerability to human impact, 2001, Tuyet D. ,
Karst in Vietnam covers an area of about 60,000 km(2), i.e. 18 % of the surface of the country. The country has an annual average temperature of 24 degreesC, an annual average rainfall of 2300 nun and a relative humidity of about 90%. Karst in Vietnam is typified by peak cluster-depression landscapes ranging in elevation from 200 to over 2000 m. Tower and coastal karst landscapes also exit. Because of naturally favourable conditions, karst ecosystems are diverse and very rich. Higher plants(cormophytes) are abundant. They are represented by approximately 2000 species, 908 genera, 224 families, 86 orders and 7 phyla. They form a thick vegetation cover of evergreen tropical rainforest. Knowledge about lower plants is limited. The fauna is rich and diverse. Phyla such as Protozoa, Vermes, Mollusca and Arthropoda are yet ill known. Preliminary results show that the phylum Chordata is represented by 541 species from 80 families, 40 orders and 5 classes. There exist many precious and rare mammals, in particular some endemic species such as Trachypithecus poliocephalus, T. delacouri, Rhinopithecus avanculus, Rhinolophus rouxi, Seotoma dineties and Silurus cuephuongensis. The class Insecta has about 2000 species. The fast population growth, particularly in the mountainous areas of the country, triggers an increasing demand for land and therefore threatens the ecosystem. To obtain land for farming, people have cut, burned and destroyed natural forest cover; resulting in occurrence of hazards such as soil-loss, water-loss, flash floods, mud-rock flows, rock-falls, severe drought, water logging and changes of karstic aquifers etc. Poaching precious animals and illegal logging are increasing. In contrast to other natural systems, karst ecosystems cannot be reestablished once damaged. Living karst landscapes will become rocky desert ones without life. Conservation of karstic environmental systems in general and karstic ecosystems in particular should not be the sole vocation of scientists but also a duty and responsibility of authorities and people from all levels. A good example of a multidisciplinary approach to karst-related problems is the implementation of the Vietnamese-Belgian Karst Project (VBEKAP): 'Rural development in the mountain karst area of NW Vietnam by sustainable water and land management and social learning: its conditions and facilitation'. The aim of this project is to improve living conditions of local people and sustained protection and management of the karst environment and ecosystem

Le paysage karstique du versant sud de la montagne de Lure (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France), 2004, Dandurand, Grgory
Karstic landscape on the south face of Lure range (Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, France) - The karstic landscape of the Montagne de Lure seems neither attractive nor spectacular. Karstic forms are badly developed; sinks are small and filled in with red clays. Caves are narrow and their size doesnt enable man to visit them. Only the aven des Cdres reaches 172 m deep. Still, its a major contradiction that surface runoff observed in the area are thin and as poor as karstic shapes. Infiltration and subterranean water flow are fast. Nor exhaustive inventory, neither precise study about Lure ranges karsts have been published yet. Perhaps due to the mediocrity of their superficial and subterranean shapes, or perhaps in the benefit of the more spectacular karstic landscapes of the Plateau d Albion , to the west part of studied area! Still, the main problem about Lure range is the question of the relation with the Fontaine de Vaucluse and maybe with any others springs in Durance valley. Finally, the progression of woods at the end of 19th century and at the beginning of 20th century, then the increase of population since 1970s, created a lot of environmental dysfunctions, which require a specific management. But karstic shapes are unexploited; protection or valorisation plans dont exist, when interrogation about the future of biological and landscape diversity is at the top. These reasons give a particular interest to the karst landscape of the south face of the Montagne de Lure .

Glacial destruction of cave systems in high mountains, with a special reference to the Aladaglar massif, Central Taurus, Turkey, 2006, Klimchouk A. Bayari S. Nazik L. TÖ, Rk K.

Erasure of karst features and dissection of karst are among the main destructive effects of glacial action upon karst (Ford, 1983). They lead to destruction of functional relationship between the relief and a karst system, and to glacial dissection of pre-glacial cave systems. Stripping of the epikarstic zone and upper parts of cave systems on sub-horizontal surfaces results in prevalence of decapitated shafts in high mountains affected by glaciations. Vertical dissection of a karst massif by glacial erosion creates cave openings in sub-vertical surfaces (cliffs), a well known feature. Observations of vertical shafts exposed by cliffs are less common. Such shafts, unwalled by surface geomorphic processes, are in a certain way an analogous to the “unroofed” caves, exposed by denudational lowering of sub-horizontal surfaces. The Aladaglar Massif (Central Taurus, Turkey) is an outstanding example of high mountain karst. The high-altitude part of the massif has been severely glaciated during quaternary. Glacial erosion was the dominant factor in the overall surface morphology development, resulting in the formation of numerous glacial valleys, cirques, ridges and pyramidal (horn) peaks. The overall relief between the highest peaks and the lowest karst springs in Aladaglar is 3350 m. The local vertical magnitude of relief between bottoms of glacial valleys and surrounding ridges is up to 1700 m. Recent studies suggest that the most recent major glaciation occurred in the Aladaglar massif during the Holocene Cooling and terminated between 9,300 and 8,300 years BP. This paper describes unwalled shafts at subvertical surfaces, a feature which is common in Aladaglar but is not so common, or overlooked, in other high mountain areas. Exposure of such shafts is mainly due to intense gravitational processes induced by the combined effect of the removal of the ice support to cliffs and the glacial rebound.


The deepest cave in the world in the Arabika Massif (Western Caucasus), 2008, Klimchouk A. B. , Samokhin G. V. & Kasjan Yu. M.

Arabika is an outstanding high-mountain karst massif in the Western Caucasus composed of Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic limestones continuously dipping southwest to the Black Sea shore and plunging below the sea level. The central sector (elevations within 2000-2700 m) is characterized by pronounced glacio-karstic landscape and hosts several deep caves including the deepest cave in the world (Krubera-Voronja Cave) recently explored to the depth of -2191 m.  Dye tracing experiments conducted in 1984-1985 revealed that the Krubera Cave area is hydraulically connected with major springs at the Black Sea shore and the submarine discharge, with the flow directed across major fold structures. Krubera Cave has an extremely steep profile and reveals a huge thickness of the vadose zone. Its lower boundary is at elevation of about 110 m, which suggests a very low overall hydraulic gradient of 0.007-0.008. Reported low salinity groundwater tapped by boreholes in the shore area at depths 40-280, 500, 1750 and 2250 m, which suggests the existence of deep flow system with vigorous flow. Submarine discharge in the Arabika coast is reported at depths up to ca. 400 m bsl. Huge closed submarine depression is revealed at the sea-floor in front of Arabika with the deepest point of ca. 400 m bsl. These facts point to a possibility that the main karst system in Arabika could have originated in response to the Messinian salinity crisis (5.96 – 5.33 Myr) when the Black Sea could have almost dried up, similarly to the adjacent Mediterranean where the sea level drop up to 1600 m is well established. Further development of the huge vadose zone and a super-deep cave have been caused by subsequent uplifts during Pliocene-Pleistocene, highly differential between the shore sector (0.1-0.2 km of total uplift) and the central sector (2-2.5 km) of Arabika.


HIGH MOUNTAIN KARREN IN NORTHWESTERN YUNNAN, CHINA, 2010, Knez Martin, Liu Hong & Slabe Tadej
The high mountain karren rock relief reveals the manner of the formation of the mountain karst surface in the northwestern part of Yunnan at altitudes between 4,000 and 4,600 m. Two dominant factors, snow and rain, decisively influence the formation of the majority of rock forms; in places, particularly on the Shika Snow Mountain, two additional factors are subsoil corrosion and water trickling from overgrown surfaces. Biocorrosion is important for the fine dissection of the rock. Sub-snow rock forms dominate in places where the rock has been covered by snow for a longer period. These are primarily the gently sloping sunless parts of the karren, the lower parts or lower walls of karren, and fissures. Gently sloping sunless parts of the karren are often dissected in various ways so there are sub-snow forms on their lower parts and rock forms carved by rainwater on the higher parts, peaks, and ridges. Rain rock forms dominate on sunny surfaces and parts of the rock that are steep, located higher above the floor, and covered by only a thin layer of snow. The relief and individual rock forms are also influenced by the fissuring and the recrystallization of rock characteristic of the Shika Snow Mountain. The rock masses on the Yulong Snow Mountain are larger and its rock forms have more regular shapes. On the Shika Snow Mountain, rock recrystallization has an important influence on the rock forms, causing fine diversities and often jagged edges of rock forms. By this feature of rock forms and the frequent and originally subsoil rock formation on the Shika Snow Mountain we can distinguish the two described areas of mountain karren. In both mountain areas, the basic characteristics are the same and unique. The rock relief of the mountain karren described in this paper is predominantly dictated by the wider climate and microclimate conditions, the form of precipitation, the alternation of snow and rain, the distribution of precipitation, and the solar exposure of the karren.

Determining Geophysical Properties of a Near-Surface Cave through Integrated Microgravity Vertical Gradient and Electrical Resistivity Tomography, 2011, Gambetta M. , Armadillo E. , Carmisciano C. , Stefanelli P. , Cocchi L. , Caratori Tontini F.

Vertical-gradient microgravity and electrical-resistivity tomography geophysical surveys were performed over a shallow cave in the Italian Armetta Mountain karst area, close to the Liguria-Piedmont watershed. The aim of this study was to test the geophysical response of a known shallow cave. The shallowest portion of the cave exhibits narrow passages and, at about 30 meters below the entrance, a fossil meander linking two large chambers, the target of the geophysical survey. The integrated results of the two surveys show a clear geophysical response to the cave. The surveys exhibited high resistivity values and a negative gravity anomaly over the large cave passages. This work confirms the ability of these geophysical techniques to give the precise location of the voids, even in complex environments. The application of these techniques can be successful for site surveying where the presence of hollows may be expected.


Results 1 to 15 of 22
You probably didn't submit anything to search for