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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That spencerite is a cave mineral - zn4(po4)2(oh)2.3h2o [11].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for north american (Keyword) returned 30 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 30
Earthworms of North American Caves, 1959, Gates, G. E.

Contribution to the study of the biology of Asellus cavaticus Leydig (preliminary note)., 1965, Henry Jean Paul
The cavernicole asellid Asellus cavaticus Leydig has been reared in our laboratory for more than twenty months, permitting us to give some data on the sexual cycle of this species. Females provided with brood pouches seem to be more numerous in the spring, as is the case with the subterranean amphipod Niphargus virei Chevreux. The average length of the incubation period seems much shorter than that of other troglobitic species such as Niphargus virei Chevreux or Caecosphaeroma burgundum Dollfus, so that the life cycle of our species is nearer to that of epigean Asellus. The number of young per brood appears to be related to the length of the female, as is suggested by our observations on 52 ovigerous females, but there must be other factors which influence this quantity. The comparison between our observations and those made on the North American cavernicole Asellus tridentatus Hungerford shows that the sexual biology of these two species is apparently quite different.

North American Troglobitic Salamanders: Some Aspects of Modification in Cave Habitats, with Special Reference to Gyrinophilus palleucus, 1971, Brandon, Ronald A. 1

A new species of the subterranean Amphipod genus Allocrangonyx (Gammaridae), with a redescription of the genus and the remarks on its zoogeography., 1971, Holsinger John R.
The systematics of the North American, subterranean amphipod genus Allocrangonyx are revised and two species are recognized; A. pellucidus (Mackin) and A. hubrichti, new species. Allocrangonyx is critically compared with the European genus Niphargus and several endemic North American genera of the Crangonyx group. Because of its unique morphological position, Allocrangonyx is removed from the Crangonyx group and placed in the newly designated AlIocrangonyx group. Some factors believed to have influenced speciation within the genus are discussed in some detail.

A new species of the subterranean Amphipod genus Allocrangonyx (Gammaridae), with a redescription of the genus and the remarks on its zoogeography., 1971, Holsinger John R.
The systematics of the North American, subterranean amphipod genus Allocrangonyx are revised and two species are recognized; A. pellucidus (Mackin) and A. hubrichti, new species. Allocrangonyx is critically compared with the European genus Niphargus and several endemic North American genera of the Crangonyx group. Because of its unique morphological position, Allocrangonyx is removed from the Crangonyx group and placed in the newly designated AlIocrangonyx group. Some factors believed to have influenced speciation within the genus are discussed in some detail.

The evolution of the Eastern North American Isopods of the Genus Asellus (Crustacea: Asellidae)., 1972, Fleming Laurence E.
This paper is the first in a three part series concerned with the evolution of North American isopods of the genus Asellus. It contains the descriptions of four new species of isopods and a list of pertinent new range data of presently known species.

The evolution of the Eastern North American Isopods of the Genus Asellus (Crustacea: Asellidae)., 1972, Fleming Laurence E.
This paper is the first in a three part series concerned with the evolution of North American isopods of the genus Asellus. It contains the descriptions of four new species of isopods and a list of pertinent new range data of presently known species.

The evolution of the Eastern North American Isopods of the Genus Asellus (Crustacea: Asellidae)., 1973, Fleming Laurence E.
This paper is the second in the three part series dealing with the evolution of the North American isopods of the genus Asellus. The generic status of Asellus is discussed with emphasis placed on the newly proposed genera of Henry and Magniez (1968). Use is made of comparative anatomical and where feasible statistical methods during this investigation. The first, shorter portion of the study deals with the presentation of evidence supporting the viewpoint that if 'Pseudobaicalasellus" is to be considered a valid genus then it must include the members of the Cannulus Group of Steeves (1965). The second portion of the study is concerned with the determination of the generic status of the eastern North American isopods. From the data presented it is felt that it is inadvisable to elevate species; groups of Asellus to the rank of genera. A generic diagnosis of the genus Asellus is presented. A list of North American species of the genus Asellus as well as a key to North American species of Asellus is included. The reduction to synonymy of certain nominal species of the genus Asellus is also given.

Branchiobdellids (Annelida: Clitellata) from some Eastern North American caves, with descriptions of new species of the Genus Cambarincola., 1973, Holt Perry C.
Branchiobdellids are found as epizoites on crustaceans of the orders Isopoda and Decapoda (cambarine crayfishes) in caves of eastern North America. Species that may be considered as troglobites, since they are not known from epigean waters, appear to be confirmed to truly troglobitic isopods and possibly a few troglobitic crayfishes from Florida and the Tennessee-Kentucky Highland Rim cave belt. The majority of the records of branchiobdellids from caves are of representatives of common epigean forms epizootic un crayfishes. Cross-referenced lists of branchiobdellids, their hosts and cave localities are presented. Some of the new species described are apparently troglobitic or troglophilic, but they present no consistent phylogenetic or geographical pattern and separate origins for them from primitive stocks of the genus Cambarincola are postulated.

The evolution of the Eastern North American Isopods of the Genus Asellus (Crustacea: Asellidae)., 1973, Fleming Laurence E.
This paper is the second in the three part series dealing with the evolution of the North American isopods of the genus Asellus. The generic status of Asellus is discussed with emphasis placed on the newly proposed genera of Henry and Magniez (1968). Use is made of comparative anatomical and where feasible statistical methods during this investigation. The first, shorter portion of the study deals with the presentation of evidence supporting the viewpoint that if 'Pseudobaicalasellus" is to be considered a valid genus then it must include the members of the Cannulus Group of Steeves (1965). The second portion of the study is concerned with the determination of the generic status of the eastern North American isopods. From the data presented it is felt that it is inadvisable to elevate species; groups of Asellus to the rank of genera. A generic diagnosis of the genus Asellus is presented. A list of North American species of the genus Asellus as well as a key to North American species of Asellus is included. The reduction to synonymy of certain nominal species of the genus Asellus is also given.

Branchiobdellids (Annelida: Clitellata) from some Eastern North American caves, with descriptions of new species of the Genus Cambarincola., 1973, Holt Perry C.
Branchiobdellids are found as epizoites on crustaceans of the orders Isopoda and Decapoda (cambarine crayfishes) in caves of eastern North America. Species that may be considered as troglobites, since they are not known from epigean waters, appear to be confirmed to truly troglobitic isopods and possibly a few troglobitic crayfishes from Florida and the Tennessee-Kentucky Highland Rim cave belt. The majority of the records of branchiobdellids from caves are of representatives of common epigean forms epizootic un crayfishes. Cross-referenced lists of branchiobdellids, their hosts and cave localities are presented. Some of the new species described are apparently troglobitic or troglophilic, but they present no consistent phylogenetic or geographical pattern and separate origins for them from primitive stocks of the genus Cambarincola are postulated.

Continental Pleistocene Climatic Variations from Speleothem Age and Isotopic Data, 1974, Thompson Peter, Schwarcz Henry P. , Ford Derek C. ,
Speleothems from continental North American caves have been dated by means of the 230Th/234U method. Oxygen isotopic variations in the dated samples and phases of speleothem deposition can be interpreted in terms of climatic change. A glacial chronology constructed from the age and isotopic data lends support to the astronomical theory of climatic change

Paramexiweckelia, a new Genus of Subterranean Amphipod Crustacean (Hadziidae) from Northern Mexico., 1982, Holsinger John R.
Paramexiweckelia, new genus, is described from a groundwater outlet in Cohauila, Mexico. The type-species, by monotypy, is Mexiweckelia particeps Holsinger. Based on the number of its plesiomorphic (ancestral) characters, this genus is the most primitive member of the family Hadziidae from the North American mainland.

Bacterial Deposition of Iron and Manganese Oxides in North American Caves, 1986, Peck, Stewart B.

The cricket fauna of Chiapanecan caves (Mexico): systematics, phylogeny and the evolution of troglobitic life (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Phalangopsidae, Luzarinae), 1993, Desuttergrandcolas Laure
The present study deals with the cavernicolous Grylloidea of Chiapas. It details the composition of this fauna, which belongs exclusively to the Phalangopsid group Amphiacustae, and considers its troglobitic evolution in the methodological framework of Comparative Biology. This method consists in analysing the evolution of biological features in reference to phylogeny, using character state optimization. The material studied comes mostly from Italian biospeological expeditions, but also from the authors work in Mexico, from North American biospeological expeditions achieved in Central America and the West Indies, and from the collections of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, the Museum National d'Histoire naturelle de Paris and the University of Michigan Museum of Zoology. I first present a systematic and phylogenetic analysis of Amphiacustae. Six new genera are defined and the genus Amphiacusta Saussure, 1874 is clearly delimited; twenty-three of the twenty six species considered in the paper are new and described. A key for genera and species groups is given. Phylogenetic relationships among genera are established using cladistics (implicit enumeration of Hennig 86 program). The evolution of troglobitic Amphiacustae is then analyzed. Available data on the biology of Amphiacust genera are presented and compared with what is known on other Phalangopsidae. Three biological attributes are moreover defined (troglobitic versus non troglobitic; cavernicolous versus non cavernicolous; leaf litter foraging versus leaf litter not foraging). The mapping of the attributes upon our cladogram has shown that Amphiacustae evolved twice toward cave life and that their ancestral habitat could be characterized by cavernicolous habits and leaf litter foraging. The results are discussed in reference to theories on troglobitic taxa evolution, and to the exaptation concept of Gould & Vrba (1982). This leads to three main conclusions: 1/ Amphiacust adaptation to caves could be the result of a tentative to exploit karstic resources in Central America; 2/ An epigean dispersion by cave living species can be hypothesized; 3/ For Grylloidea, having cavernicolous habits at ground level appears to be exaptative to troglobitic life.

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