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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That emergence is a general term for the outflowing water, for the opening or for the area of outflow of a karst spring; includes exsurgence and resurgence [20]. synonyms: (french.) emergence; (german.) ausflubtelle, karstquelle; (greek.) pighazon ythor (or kephalari); (italian.) risorgenza; (russian.) vyhod karstovyh vod; (spanish.) fuente, manantial, surgencia; (turkish.) yuzeye erisim; (yugoslavian.) krsko vrelo, krski izvor, obrh. see also exsurgence; resurgence; rise.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for numerical-models (Keyword) returned 9 results for the whole karstbase:
Hydrogeology of the Umm Er Radhuma aquifer, Saudi Arabia, with reference to fossil gradients, 1982, Bakiewicz W, Milne Dm, Noori M,
Much of North Africa and the Arabian peninsula, lying in the Saharan climate zone, are underlain by huge tabular sandstone and carbonate aquifers, ranging in age from Cambrian to Tertiary. These are often saturated with water of reasonable quality and form very valuable resources in an area often desperately short of water. The Palaeocene Umm Er Radhuma carbonate aquifer is one such formation which has been the subject of intensive recent investigation. The formation contains groundwater of a reasonable quality, has adequate transmission and storage characteristics and hence considerable potential for future development. The origin of the water in such aquifers is the subject of continuing controversy. It is not disputed that the water is moving under the influence of regional groundwater gradients but origins of these gradients are the subject of considerable argument. On the one hand, there are those who hold that the presently observed gradients are fossil remnants of conditions created by a much wetter climatic regime prevalent some thousands of years ago. Against this are those who maintain that the gradients, at least in part, reflect a present day system with groundwater discharge in approximate dynamic equilibrium with recharge. This paper examines the hydrogeology of a typical Middle Eastern formation of the disputed kind, the Umm Er Radhuma aquifer in Saudi Arabia, and, with the aid of analytical and numerical models, attempts to resolve the problem of the origin of the observed groundwater gradients and to discover the extent to which the past must influence present day plans for future development

Principles of early development of karst conduits under natural and man-made conditions revealed by mathematical analysis of numerical models, 1996, Dreybrodt W,
Numerical models of the enlargement of primary fissures in limestone by calcite aggressive water show a complex behavior. If the lengths of the fractures are large and hydraulic heads are low, as is the case in nature, dissolution rates at the exit of the channel determine its development by causing a slow increase of water flow, which after a long gestation time by positive feedback accelerates dramatically within a short time span. Mathematical analysis of simplified approximations yields an analytical expression for the breakthrough time, when this happens, in excellent agreement with the results of a numerical model. This expression quantifies the geometrical, hydraulic, and chemical parameters determining such karat processes. If the lengths of the enlarging channels are small, but hydraulic heads are high, as is the case for artificial hydraulic structures such as darns, it is the widening at the entrance of the flow path which determines the enlargement of the conduit. Within the lifetime of the dam this can cause serious water losses, This can also be explained by mathematical analysis of simplified approximations which yield an analytical threshold condition from which the safety of a dam can be judged. Thus in both cases the dynamic processes of karstification are revealed to gain a deeper understanding of the early development of karst systems. As a further important result, one finds that minimum conditions, below which karstification cannot develop, do not exist

Infiltration measured by the drip of stalactites, 2000, Sanz E. , Lopez J. J. ,
The hydrodynamic processes and mechanisms involved in rain infiltration and recharge in local areas of karst terrain can be identified and quantified by using measurements of the seepage of cave stalactites, Detailed measurements of the seepage of stalactites in seven caves located in an area close to the land surface, or the subcutaneous area of the karst, show a diversity of complex factors involved in infiltration: type of precipitation (rain or snow), air temperature, soil type and thickness, etc., which give rise to larger or smaller variations of flow in the espeleothem hydrographs, In some cases, no explanation can be found for the response of stalactites to rainfall, while in others there is a relationship between outer atmospheric parameters and the recharge represented by the stalactite drip. Romperopas Cave (Spain) has both a rapid and a basic flow, with hydrograph recessions similar to those observed in other caves. Water seepage in this cave varies greatly both in space and in time. The infiltration in Altamira Cave (Spain) was calculated and a multiple regression was found between infiltration, rain and outside air temperature. In other cases, the balance of the water on the soil is responsible for the seepage, Thus, a precipitation runoff numerical model that simulated the stalactite hydrographs could be applied to the Baradla and Beke Caves (Hungary), The complex properties of the ground, which are required for other flow numerical models for the unsaturated zone, were not taken into consideration

HJWFTAC: software for Hantush-Jacob analysis of variable-rate, multiple-extraction well pumping tests, 2002, Fleming Sw, Ruskauff Gj, Adams A,
Analytical well test solutions are a powerful approach to aquifer characterization and the parameterization of comprehensive numerical models. In addition, wellfield drawdown tests, which consist of coordinated pumping and data collection at a suite of monitoring and operating production wells, are of growing significance due to increasing pressures upon groundwater resources and the consequent management and planning requirement for superior hydrogeologic characterization of existing production wellfields. However. few pumping test analysis codes accommodate the multiple extraction wells involved, particularly for more sophisticated analytic aquifer test solutions. We present and demonstrate here a FORTRAN code for analysis of drawdown at a monitor well due to simultaneous variable-rate pumping at multiple independent production wells, which we developed in response to a need to refine an existing numerical, coupled groundwater/surface water resource management model, Spatial and temporal superposition are used to accommodate the typical operational properties of wellfield pumping tests, The software invokes the well-accepted Hantush-Jacob method for semiconfined or 'leaky' aquifers in a forward simulation procedure and effectively assumes homogeneity in applicable aquifer parameters (transmissivity, coefficient of storage, and leakance). Intended for both professionals and students, the code is widely applicable and straightforward to use as written. However, it can be modified with relative ease to use alternative well test solutions and/or formal inverse modeling techniques, or to accommodate spatial hydrogeologic variability. An application to a pumping test conducted in a karst limestone aquifer at the Cross Bar Ranch wellfield in Tampa Bay, Florida, demonstrates the utility of the software. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved

Karst aquifer evolution in a changing water table environment - art. no. 1090, 2002, Kaufmann G. ,
[1] A vertical cross section through a karst aquifer is modeled by means of the finite element method to study the evolution of fractures and flow in the aquifer. The karst aquifer receives a constant recharge along the top boundary by precipitation and drains toward a resurgence assumed to be the base level in a valley. Flow is allowed both in the permeable rock matrix and the fracture network, and the fractures are enlarged with time by chemical dissolution. Hence during the early evolution of the karst aquifer the conductivity increases over several orders of magnitude, and the initially high water table drops to a steady state base level niveau. As a consequence, fractures above the final water table change from phreatic to vadose flow conditions. A systematic parameter study is carried out to investigate the aquifer evolution over a wide range of parameters, such as recharge rate, initial fracture width and density, and initial calcium concentration. The numerical models cover a wide range of drainage patterns, from phreatic water table caves to deep bathyphreatic caves to vadose river caves. The models suggest that a single theoretical approach is capable of explaining most common cave passage patterns

Numerical models for mixing corrosion in natural and artificial karst environments, 2003, Kaufmann G. ,
[1] The enlargement of initially small fractures in a karst aquifer by chemical dissolution is studied. Flow in the aquifer is driven by head differences between sinks and resurgences, and flow depends on the permeability of small fissures and fractures in the aquifer. Enlargement of fractures is controlled by the chemical composition of the recharge, as water undersaturated with respect to calcite is able to dissolve material from the fracture walls. As fractures are enlarged with time, permeability within the aquifer increases significantly, and flow becomes very heterogeneous. Two different processes are considered: enlargement due to normal corrosion, where water is undersaturated with respect to calcite, and enlargement due to mixing corrosion, where two solutions saturated with respect to calcite but with different carbon dioxide concentrations mix and the resulting solution becomes undersaturated again. The importance of mixing corrosion is discussed for two boundary conditions: A natural karst aquifer is modeled with fixed recharge boundary conditions representing sinking streams, and an artificial karst aquifer is simulated with fixed head boundary conditions representing a reservoir. In both cases, mixing corrosion is important, especially if recharge is characterized by an almost saturated chemistry. Mixing corrosion significantly changes the evolving passage pattern, as dissolution due to mixing of solutions is possible deep in the aquifer. Mixing corrosion also reduces breakthrough times of the aquifer and can result in dramatic leakage underneath dam sites, even if the impounded water is almost saturated with respect to calcite

Analytical and numerical models to explain steady rates of spring flow, 2004, Swanson S. K. , Bahr J. M. ,
Flow from some springs in former glacial lakebeds of the Upper Midwest is extremely steady throughout the year and does not increase significantly after precipitation events or seasonal recharge. Analytical and simplified numerical models of spring systems were used to determine whether preferential ground water flow through high-permeability features in shallow sandstone aquifers could produce typical values of spring discharge and the unusually steady rates of spring flow. The analytical model is based on a one-dimensional solution for periodic ground water flow. Solutions to this model suggest that it is unlikely that a periodic forcing due to seasonal variations in areal recharge would propagate to springs in a setting where high-permeability features exist. The analytical model shows that the effective length of the aquifer, or the length of flowpaths to a spring, and the total transmissivity of the aquifer have the greatest potential to impact the nature of spring flow in this setting. The numerical models show that high-permeability features can influence the magnitude of spring flow and the results demonstrate that the lengths of ground water flowpaths increase when high-permeability features are explicitly modeled, thus decreasing the likelihood for temporal variations in spring flow

Matrix permeability of the confined Floridan Aquifer, Florida, USA, 2004, Budd Da, Vacher Hl,
The Upper Floridan Aquifer of peninsular Florida retains most of its depositional porosity and, as a result, is a multi-porosity aquifer: double porosity (fractured porous aquifer) downdip where the aquifer is confined, and triple porosity (karstic, fractured porous aquifer) in the updip, unconfined region. Matrix permeability in the confined region varies in the range <10(-14.41)-10(-11.1) m(2), as determined by 12,000 minipermeameter measurements on 1,210 m of slabbed core. Limestones divide into 13 textural classes and dolomites into two. Depositional facies (textural class) strongly correlates with matrix permeability. As a result, the facies architecture of the Eocene and Oligocene carbonates that compose the confined portion of the aquifer controls the lateral and vertical distribution of its matrix transmissivity. The most-permeable facies are grainstones (median k, 10(-12.4) m(2)) and sucrosic dolomites (median k, 10(-12.0) m(2)). Together, they are responsible for &SIM;73% of the matrix transmissivity of the logged cores, although they constitute only &SIM;24% of the thickness. Examination of the flow equations of fractured porous aquifers suggests that the permeability of these two facies is large enough that matrix permeability cannot be discounted in modeling the hydraulics of the double-porosity system. This conclusion likely applies to most, if not all, Cenozoic double-porosity carbonate aquifers, as average matrix and fracture permeabilities in the Floridan Aquifer are similar to other Cenozoic carbonates from around the world

On the importance of geological heterogeneity for flow simulation, 2006, Eaton Tt,
Geological heterogeneity is recognized as a major control on reservoir production and constraint on many aspects of quantitative hydrogeology. Hydrogeologists and reservoir geologists need to characterize groundwater flow through many different types of geological media for different purposes. In this introductory paper, an updated perspective is provided on the current status of the long effort to understand the effect of geological heterogeneity on flow using numerical simulations. A summary is given of continuum vs. discrete paradigms, and zonal vs. geostatistical approaches, all of which are used to structure model domains. Using these methods and modern simulation tools, flow modelers now have greater opportunities to account for the increasingly detailed understanding of heterogeneous aquifer and reservoir systems.One way of doing this would be to apply a broader interpretation of the idea of hydrofacies, long used by hydrogeologists. Simulating flow through heterogeneous geologic media requires that numerical models capture important aspects of the structure of the flow domain. Hydrofacies are reinterpreted here as scale-dependent hydrogeologic units with a particular representative elementary volume (REV) or structure of a specific size and shape. As such, they can be delineated in indurated sedimentary or even fractured aquifer systems, independently of lithofacies, as well as in the unlithified settings in which they have traditionally been used. This reconsideration of what constitutes hydrofacies, the building blocks for representing geological heterogeneity in flow models, may be of some use in the types of settings described in this special issue

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