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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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Your search for paleontology (Keyword) returned 19 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 19
Paleontological Studies at Wellington Caves N.S.W., 1986, Augee, Michael L.

There is no evidence that Aboriginal Australians entered or used Wellington Caves. However the very first record of the caves by European Man, a drawing made by Augustus Earle in 1826 or 1827, illustrates aboriginals just outside the entrance to Cathedral Cave. That may of course simply be artistic embellishment, and it is not absolutely certain that the picture is Cathedral Cave entrance as Earle refers to it as "Mosman's Cave in the Wellington Valley". No other use of that name is known. So credit for the first reference to Wellington Caves is usually given to the explorer Hamilton Hume from an entry in his diary for December 1828. The first reference to the rich fossil deposits in the Wellington Cave System appeared shortly thereafter in the form of a letter to the Sydney Gazette dated 25 May 1830 from Mr George Rnaken of Bathurst (Lane and Richards 1963). Shortly thereafter Rnaken accompanied the colonial surveyor, Major Thomas Mitchell, to the Wellington Valley arriving in July 1830. Mitchell, realising the scientific value of the fossils, sent collections to Europe in 1830 and 1831. There they were examined by the leading scientists of the time, including Richard Owen in London and colleagues of Cuvier in Paris (the Baron having died in 1892) (Lane and Richards 1963, Foster, 1936). Modern paleontologists, beset by postal strikes and delays of several years in publication can take no joy from the fact that fossils from Wellington Caves, excavated in the second half of 1830, had been received in Europe, examined and referred to by Lyell in his classic "Principles of Geography" in 1833!


Breccia bodies in deformed Cambrian limestones, Heritage Range, Ellsworth Mountains, West Antarctica, 1992, Sporli K. B. , Craddock C. , Rutford R. H. , Craddock J. P.

Morphological affinities of the proximal ulna from Klasies River main site: Archaic or modern?, 1996, Churchill Se, Pearson Om, Grine Fe, Trinkaus E, Holliday Tw,
The Middle Stone Age (MSA) asociated hominids from Klasies River Mouth (KRM) have taken on a key role in debate about the origins of modern humans, with their craniofacial remains seen as either representing the earliest well-dated modern humans in southern Africa or orthognathic late archaic humans. Diagnostic postcranial remains from Klasies are few, but one specimen-a proximal right ulna from the lower SAS member-is useful For assessing the morphological affinities of these hominids. Canonical variates analysis using 14 proximal ulnar dimensions and comparative data from European, west Asian and African archaic humans, and Levantine Mousterian, European Upper Paleolithic, African Epipaleolithic and diverse recent modern human samples (many of recent African descent) were employed to assess the morphological affinities of this specimen. Results suggest an archaic total morphological pattern for the Klasies ulna. Analysis of diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry reveals an ulnar shaft with relatively thick cortical bone, but the specimen cannot be readily distinguished from Neandertals or early anatomically modem humans on the basis of shaft cross-sectional properties. If the isolated ulna from Klasies is indicative of the general postcranial morphology of these hominids, then the MSA-associated humans from KRM may not be as modern as has been claimed from the craniofacial material. It ii: possible also that the skeletal material from KRM reflects mosaic evolution-retention of archaic postcranial characteristics. perhaps indicating retention of archaic habitual behavior patterns, in hominids that were becoming craniofacially modern. (C) 1996 Academic Press Limited

Vertebrate Paleontology of Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico, 1998, Frank, E. F. , Benson, R.
Vertebrate fossil materials were collected from over a dozen cave localities on Isla de Mona, Puerto Rico. Guano deposits at these localities were excavated and sifted to recover bone materials. The predominant vertebrate fossils recovered at every sifting site were Audubons shearwater (Puffinus lherminieri) bones. Fragmentary undifferentiated lizard bones were also found sporadically in the sifted material. Fossil skeletal bones and fresh bones from other bird species were found on the surface of the cave floors at several localities. Extensive fossil guano deposits on the island are interpreted to be of mixed origin with deposits near entrances primarily derived from bird guano, and deposits from the darker interiors of the caves derived from bat guano.

Paleokarsts in late Precambrian and Ordovician carbonates, Kalpin-Shaya uplift zone, Tarim basin, China, 1999, Cao Hs, Yang Jd, Wang Dn,
The reservoir properties in the Kalpin-Shaya uplift zone, Tarim basin, are a common concern with regards to petroleum exploration and reservoir evaluation alike. Dissolution and paleokarst have a positive impact on the porosity as well as the storage capacity of carbonate reservoirs because the secondary porosity related to dissolution and paleokarst serves as excellent traps for migrating hydrocarbons. In order to evaluate the reservoir characteristics reasonably in the late Precambrian and Ordovician carbonate rocks, the secondary porosity, which was produced by dissolution and paleokarstification in late diagenetic stage. should be studied because the primary pores were mostly destroyed during the early-middle diagenesis due to serious compaction and multi-cementation. Carbonate rocks ate among the most important collectors of oil and gas accumulations in the world Important oil and gas reservoirs in paleokarst-containing carbonate rocks are known worldwide because micropores and megapores, such as solution openings, solution fissures, funnels, sinkholes. and caves, serve as the fundamentally important secondary porosity in those rocks. Several wells revealed that the Kalpin-Shaya region is a prospective target for oil and gas exploration. The reservoir carbonates of the Kalpin-Shaya uplift zone in the northern Tarim include dolomites and limestones. The best dolomite reservoirs are in the late Precambrian Qigebulake Formation (Z(2)(2)), the lower Qiulitage Group (is an element of(2-3)), the upper Qiulitage Group (O-1(1)), smd the Xiaoerbulake Formation (is an element of(1)), whereas limestone reservoirs are in the middle-upper formations of the upper Qiulitage Group (O-1(2-3)). On the basis of the study of petrology, paleontology, and stratigraphy from field work and well core data, the pore spaces within the Precambrian and Ordovician carbonate reservoirs are studied with the aim of proving that all secondary pores are controlled by dissolution and paleokarst

A modern human humerus from the early Aurignacian of Vogelherdhohle (Stetten, Germany), 2000, Churchill Se, Smith Fh,
Implicit in much of the discussion of the cultural and population biological dynamics of modern human origins in Europe is the assumption that the Aurignacian, from its very start, was made by fully modern humans. The veracity of this assumption has been challenged in recent years by the association of Neandertal skeletal remains with a possibly Aurignacian assemblage at Vindija Cave (Croatia) and the association of Neandertals with distinctly Upper Paleolithic (but non-Aurignacian) assemblages at Arcysur-Cure and St. Cesaire (France). Ideally we need human fossil material that can be confidently assigned to the early Aurignacian to resolve this issue, yet in reality there is a paucity of well-provenanced human fossils from early Upper Paleolithic contexts. One specimen, a right humerus from the site of Vogelherd (Germany), has been argued, based on its size, robusticity, and muscularity, to possibly represent a Neandertal in an Aurignacian context. The morphological affinities of the Vogelherd humerus were explored by univariate and multivariate comparisons of humeral epiphyseal and diaphyseal shape and strength measures relative to humeri of Neandertals and Early Upper Paleolithic (later Aurignacian and Gravettian) modern humans. On the basis of diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry, deltoid tuberosity morphology, and distal epiphyseal morphology, the specimen falls clearly and consistently with European early modern humans and not with Neandertals. Along with the other Vogelherd human remains, the Vogelherd humerus represents an unequivocal association between the Aurignacian and modern human morphology in Europe. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc

Contribution to the speleology of Sterkfontein cave, Gauteng province, South Africa., 2003, Keyser Andre, Martini Jacques E. J. , Moen Henri F. G. , Wipplinger Paul E.
The authors present more data about the speleological aspect of the Sterkfontein Cave, famous for its bone breccia which yielded abundant hominid remains. They also briefly review the previous voluminous studies by numerous authors, which are mainly dealing with the paleontology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of the breccia. The present investigations were oriented to hitherto poorly investigated aspects such as detail mapping of the cave, its country rock stratigraphy and recording the underground extension of the basal part of the breccia body. The cave consists of a complex network of phreatic channels, developed along joints in Neoarchaean cherty dolostone over a restricted surface of 250x250m. The combined length of all passages within this area amounts to 5,23km. The system extends over a height of about 50m and the dry part of it is limited downwards by the water-table appearing as numerous static pools. The fossiliferous breccia (= Sterkfontein Formation) forms an irregular lenticular mass 75x25m horizontally by 40m vertically, which is included within the passage network. It crops out at surface and in the cave, and resulted from the filling of a collapse chamber, which was de-roofed by erosion. The present investigation confirmed that the cave and the Sterkfontein Formation are part of a single speleogenetic event. The breccia resulted from cavity filling by sediments introduced from a pit entrance, whereas many of the phreatic passages around it, which are developed at the same elevation, were only partly filled or remained entirely open up to present. This filling took place mainly in a vadose environment. Taking into account the age of the Sterkfontein Formation (>3,3-1,5 My, from base to top), the geomorphic evolution of the landscape and the context of other caves in the region, it seems that the cave might have started to form 5 My ago. It has been continuously developing up to present as a result of a slow drop of the water-table.

Contribution to the speleology of Sterkfontein Cave, Gauteng Province, South Africa, 2004, Martini J. E. J. , Wipplinger P. E. , Moen H. F. G. , Keyser A.

The authors present more data about the speleological aspect of the Sterkfontein Cave, famous for its bone breccia which yielded abundant hominid remains. They also briefly review the previous voluminous studies by numerous authors, which are mainly dealing with the paleontology, stratigraphy and sedimentology of the breccia. The present investigations were oriented to hitherto poorly investigated aspects such as detail mapping of the cave, its country rock stratigraphy and recording the underground extension of the basal part of the breccia body. The cave consists of a complex network of phreatic channels, developed along joints in Neoarchaean cherty dolostone over a restricted surface of 250x250m. The combined length of all passages within this area amounts to 5,23km. The system extends over a height of about 50m and the dry part of it is limited downwards by the water-table appearing as numerous static pools. The fossiliferous breccia (= Sterkfontein Formation) forms an irregular lenticular mass 75x25m horizontally by 40m vertically, which is included within the passage network. It crops out at surface and in the cave, and resulted from the filling of a collapse chamber, which was de-roofed by erosion.
The present investigation confirmed that the cave and the Sterkfontein Formation are part of a single speleogenetic event. The breccia resulted from cavity filling by sediments introduced from a pit entrance, whereas many of the phreatic passages around it, which are developed at the same elevation, were only partly filled or remained entirely open up to present. This filling took place mainly in a vadose environment.
Taking into account the age of the Sterkfontein Formation (>3,3-1,5 My, from base to top), the geomorphic evolution of the landscape and the context of other caves in the region, it seems that the cave might have started to form 5 My ago. It has been continuously developing up to present as a result of a slow drop of the water-table.


Paleontology: Animal Remains in Caves, 2004, Andrews P. , Llona A. C. P.

New Findings at Andrahomana Cave, Southeastern Madagascar, 2008, Burney D. A. , Vasey N. , Ramilisonina L. R. Godfrey, Jungers W. L. , Ramarolahy M. , And Raharivony L.
A remote eolianite cave and sinkhole complex on the southeast coast of Madagascar has played a major role in the history of paleontology in Madagascar. Andrahomana Cave has yielded a rich fossil record of the extinct megafauna. Expeditions in 2000 and 2003 produced a wealth of new material and provided the first systematic information concerning the genesis, stratigraphy, and taphonomy of the site. Recovered bones of one of the most poorly understood extinct large lemurs, Hadropithecus stenognathus, include many skeletal elements previously unknown. Radiocarbon dates show that the site has sampled this disappeared fauna in the midto- late Holocene, but that bone-bearing layers are stratigraphically mixed, probably owing to the effects of reworking of the sediments by extreme marine events. The diverse biota recovered contains elements of both eastern rain forest and southwestern arid bushland, reflecting the caves position in the zone of transition between wet and dry biomes. Bones of two unusual small mammals add to the previously long faunal list for the site: 1) the first fossil evidence for Macrotarsomys petteri, a large-bodied endemic nesomyid rodent previously known only from a single modern specimen; and 2) the type specimen and additional material of a newly described extinct shrew-tenrec (Microgale macpheei). Evidence for prehistoric and colonial-era humans includes artifacts, hearth deposits, and remains of human domesticates and other introduced species. Although previously protected by its extreme isolation, the unique site is vulnerable to exploitation. An incipient tourist industry is likely to bring more people to the cave, and there is currently no form of protection afforded to the site.

Results and perspectives of paleontological studies in Crimean caves, 2008, Ridush B. T. , Vremir M.

Till recently information about bone accumulations in caves of the Crimean Mountains was comparatively modest. Now several dozens of caves are known on high plateaus, which hold a rich potential regarding Late Pleistocene and Holocene fauna of the Crimean Mountains. The Chatyrdag Plateau is the best studied area with its nine bone-bearing caves documented and two caves (Marble Cave and Emine-Bair-Khosar Cave) where detailed investigations have been conducted. Paleontological potential of the Emine-Bair-Khosar Cave is tremendous. Fauna complexes belonging to the LGM (the complex of cold steps, also confirmed by paleopalinological data) and interstadials and the postglacial (predominantly related to meadows and forested landscapes of warmer climate) are identified in this cave. Enormous amount of bones, their well preserved condition, tafocenosis and species diversity give a special importance to this cave. The ongoing study of the Emine-Bair-Khosar Cave site will contribute to resolution of many issues about paleobiogeography, paleoecology and paleoclimate of this region. In other caves of Crimea important information has been also obtained.


About the work of the fall (2008) paleontological expedition in the Emine-Bair-Khosar Cave (Chatyrdag Plateau, Crimea), 2009, Ridush B. .

Paleontological expedition to caves of Odessa, 2009, Ridush B. . , Pronin K. K

New Pliocene cave site of vertebrae fauna in Ukraine, 2010, Ridush, B. T. , Synytsa, M. V. , Proskurnyak Yu. M.

Preliminary results are presented of paleontological investigation of a new cave site of fauna on the Chatyrdag Plateau in Crimea. The faunistic list of small mammals from this location likely corresponds to the second half of late Pliocene.


Cave excavation: some methodological and interpretive considerations, 2011, Stratford, D. J.

Caves potentially afford excellent levels of preservation for buried sediments, artefacts and faunal remains but, through depositional, post-depositional and diagenetic processes, material can be disassociated from its primary context. As well as the established archaeological or palaeontological research questions, the priorities of excavations in cave sediments include: identifying distinct stratigraphical units, clarifying the site formation processes responsible for the accumulation and distribution of the assemblages, and identifying any preserved primary contextual information. A wide variety of sediments that are "typically missing or masked" (Goldberg and Sherwood, 2006, p.20) in open-air sites can be encountered during cave excavation. This, combined with the stratigraphical complications inherent to cave sites makes every site different and warrants a site-specific, multi-disciplinary approach to its excavation. Stratigraphically sensitive and flexible methods of excavation and documentation are required when approaching cave excavation. A site-specific combination of techniques and practices helps ensure the stratigraphical integrity of the excavation material, successful adaptation to the cave environment and changing sedimentological conditions, and the restriction of information loss. This paper presents some important considerations needed when planning and conducting excavations of artefact and bone-bearing cave sediments as well as some of the interpretive issues surrounding the material once it is removed.


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