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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That Karrenfeld; Karren field is (german.) an area of limestone dominated by karren [10]. these appear as bare karst and consist of the sum of exposed and half-exposed karren, occasionally also of covered karren which have become exposed. they range in size from a few hectares to a few hundred square kilometers [3]. synonym: (turkish.) erime olugu alani. see also clint; grike.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
Engineering challenges in Karst, Stevanović, Zoran; Milanović, Petar
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy), Dimuccio, L.A.; Rodrigues, N.; Larocca, F.; Pratas, J.; Amado, A.M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.A.
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

Search in KarstBase

Your search for sample (Keyword) returned 493 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 493
Fungal communities on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, Arizona, USA, , Vaughan Michael J. , Maier Raina M. , Pryor Barry M.

Kartchner Caverns, located near Benson, Arizona, USA, is an active carbonate cave that serves as the major attraction for Kartchner Caverns State Park. Low-impact development and maintenance have preserved prediscovery macroscopic cavern features and minimized disturbances to biological communities within the cave.. The goal of this study was to examine fungal diversity in Kartchner Caverns on actively-forming speleothem surfaces. Fifteen formations were sampled from five sites across the cave. Richness was assessed using standard culture-based fungal isolation techniques. A culture-independent analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to assay evidence of community homogeneity across the cave through the separation of 18S rDNA amplicons from speleothem community DNA. The culturing effort recovered 53 distinct morphological taxonomic units (MTUs), corresponding to 43 genetic taxonomic units (GTUs) that represented 21 genera. From the observed MTU accumulation curve and the projected total MTU richness curve, it is estimated that 51 percent of the actual MTU richness was recovered. The most commonly isolated fungi belonged to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Phialophora, and Aspergillus. This culturebased analysis did not reveal significant differences in fungal richness or number of fungi recovered across sites. Cluster analysis using DGGE band profiles did not reveal distinctive groupings of speleothems by sample site. However, canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis of culture-independent DGGE profiles showed a significant effect of sampling site and formation type on fungal community structure. Taken together, these results reveal that diverse fungal communities exist on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, and that these communities are not uniformly distributed spatially. Analysis of sample saturation indicated that more sampling depth is required to uncover the full scale of mycological richness across spelothem surfaces.


GHOST-ROCK KARSTIFICATION IN ENTRE-DEUX-MERS (GIRONDE, FRANCE), IMPLICATIONS FOR KARSTOGENESIS AND KARSTIC MORPHOLOGY, , Dubois Caroline, Lans Benjamin, Kaufmann Olivier, Maire Richard, Quinif Yves

The formation of the Oligocene « calcaires à Astéries » in the region of « Entre-deux-Mers » is affected by a karstification with subhorizontal caves that drained rivers from swallow-holes to resurgences. Observations in quarries show that ghost-rock alterites are present. This paper describes the ghost-rocks in the quarry of Piquepoche exploiting the Frontenac stone. We have studied horizontally developed ghost-rocks with vertical extensions still containing the residual alterite. They can be badly consolidated calcarenites up to soft material which has been sampled. Speleogenesis is reviewed in the frame of the mechanical erosion of the alterite of a horizontal ghost-rock followed by an incision by free-flowing waters which form a passage with promontories and potholes. Finally, we show that ceiling anastomoses can form by ghost-rock karstification.


Micro-organisms in Caves [Samples from Gaping Ghyll], 1949, Lovett T.

Algological investigations in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky., 1965, Jones H. J.
Algological investigations carried out in the Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, revealed the presence of twenty-seven taxa representing all divisions of the Algae except the Pyrrhophyta and Phaeophyta; diatoms although observed in the samples were not dealt with in the present paper. One species, Oscillitoria clausiana spec. nov. and a form Lyngbya pusilla fa. tenuior fa. nov., both belonging to the Cyanophyta are new to science. In addition, several other rare and interesting algae were found. A comparison is made between the algal flora of the Mammoth Cave and algae found in several European caves. The ecology of the cavernicole algae is discussed.

Diatoms from Mammoth Cave, Kentucky., 1965, Van Landingham Sam L.
Samples collected in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, revealed the presence of a diversified but not too abundant diatom community in the cave. As the material was not subjected to culturing experiments but was investigated immediately after arrival, both in native and permanent preparations, it was possible to: 1. ascertain that the majority of the diatoms contained well developed, apparently healthy and functioning chloroplasts and 2. to get a rough estimate of the actual number of specimens present in a microhabitat. The identifications resulted in the recognition of 16 diatom taxa of which possibly 4 are new to science. Further studies are, however, required to ascertain this point.

Paleotemperatures and Chronology at Archeological Cave Site Revealed by Thermoluminescence, 1965, Dort W, Zeller Ej, Turner Md, Vaz Je,
Contrasting values of remnant thermoluminescence of limestone samples from Jaguar Cave, eastcentral Idaho, reveal temperature differences attributable to position within the cave microenvironment. Absence of recorded temperature change during cave-filling by rock and human debris indicates brevity of human occupation, which was near the end of Wisconsin (Pinedale) time

Movements of Rhaphidophoridae (Orthoptera) In Caves At Waitomo, New Zealand, 1965, Richards, Aola M.

Cavernicolous Rhaphidophoridae are very active insects, in spite of their immobile appearance on the walls of caves. Movement is continuous to a greater or lesser degree throughout the 24 hour period of each day. Through marking a representative sample of the total adult population of two species of Rhaphidophoridae in limestone caves in New Zealand, it was shown that several different types of movement occurred; that home ranges had no well-defined limits; and that there was no evidence of territorial behaviour. The technique of marking Rhaphidophoridae is discussed in some detail.


The Crustaceans of the reservoir of the Fontaine des Suisses at Dijon., 1966, Dussart Bernard, Graf Franois, Husson Roger
Inventory of the Crustaceans collected in the basin of the Fonatine des Suisses at Dijon. The Copepoda are represented by 5 species: Macrocyclops albidits, Eucyclops serrulatus in two slightly different forms, Eucyclops serrulatus var. mihi, Acanthocyclops venustus, Acanthocyclops vernalis and Acanthocyclops robustus. The coexistence of these two last forms in this very tiny environment makes it probable that we have here to do with two distinct species. A determination key is given for the Genus Acanthocyclops. Amphipoda are represented by Niphargus virei and especially Niphargus kochianus kochianus of which more than 100 samples have been collected. Of this last small species some considerations regarding geography, the laying of eggs, sexual dimorphism and closely related species are also given.

Algae from the cave of Matyas Mount, Budapest, Hungary., 1966, Palik P.
Seven collections containing scrapings of speleoclay or samples from the cave waters were received from L. Hajdu and were cultured in light in a modified Knop's solution. The cultures yielded 21 different algal taxa, of which five species belong to the Cyanophyta four to the Bacillariophycaea class of the Chrysophyta and twelve to the Chlorophyta. From the species distribution the cave shows a similarity to the nearby cave of Plvolgy, namely both of them contained more than 50 per cent Chlorophyta. Among the Cyanophyta the occurrence of Baradlaia speluncaecola Palik is noteworthy. This species seems to be a true troglobitic alga, since the genus is known only from caves.

A psychrophilic yeast from Mammoth Cave, Kentucky., 1967, Barr Thomas C. , Brashear David, Wiseman Ralph F.
Samples collected in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, revealed the presence of a psychrophilic yeast, tentatively identified as a strain of Candida albicans. The yeast is saprophytic on dead animal tissues and exhibits a pale yellow colour when growing in the cave. In vitro, the yeast grows poorly at 37C. and well at 130 and 200, but loses its pigmentation. It is non-pathogenic in rabbits but appears to show low-grade parasitism in frogs.

Summary of the results obtained during a preliminary investigation into the bacterial and botanical flora of caves in South Wales., 1967, Bensonevans Kathryn, Williams Mary Ann Mason
The results of an investigation into the bacterial and botanical flora of South Welsh caves are presented in tabular form. Bacterial counts and species isolated from the caves both from soil and water samples as well as from the air, also the macroscopic plants found in the photic zone are enumerated.

Further investigations into Bacterial and Algal populations of caves in South Wales., 1967, Williams Mary Ann Mason
Some physical data collected over a period of a year in seven locations of the Ogof Ffynnon Ddu cave system in South Wales are reported, including humidity, air and water temperature, pH of the water, as well as the organic oxygen demand of the water. It is shown that seasonal variations in the physical constant in this particular cave system are not well marked. Algae and bacteria were isolated from the soil samples and from calcareous deposits. A total of 30 algal species, of which 13 belong to the Cyanophyta, 22 to the Chlorophyta, and 7 to the Chrysophyta~Baccilariophyceae were found. Thirty-eight heterotrophic and 7 autotrophic bacteria were isolated. The thin films on water surfaces, besides diatoms, contained several flagellates and some ostracods, while some protozoa were found associated with the bacteria and algae in the soft calcite deposits.

A psychrophilic yeast from Mammoth Cave, Kentucky., 1967, Barr Thomas C. , Brashear David, Wiseman Ralph F.
Samples collected in Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, revealed the presence of a psychrophilic yeast, tentatively identified as a strain of Candida albicans. The yeast is saprophytic on dead animal tissues and exhibits a pale yellow colour when growing in the cave. In vitro, the yeast grows poorly at 37C. and well at 130 and 200, but loses its pigmentation. It is non-pathogenic in rabbits but appears to show low-grade parasitism in frogs.

Summary of the results obtained during a preliminary investigation into the bacterial and botanical flora of caves in South Wales., 1967, Bensonevans Kathryn, Williams Mary Ann Mason
The results of an investigation into the bacterial and botanical flora of South Welsh caves are presented in tabular form. Bacterial counts and species isolated from the caves both from soil and water samples as well as from the air, also the macroscopic plants found in the photic zone are enumerated.

Feeding efficiency in the cave Salamander Haideotriton wallacei., 1973, Peck Stewart B.
Selection for efficiency in food capture may be a dominant influence in the evolutionary biology of predaceous cave animals. A sample of 8 Haideotriton wallacei from a natural population contained 21 feeding boluses in their digestive tracts. Fourteen of these boluses contained food, demonstrating success in at least 67% of the feeding attempts.

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