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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That lateral moraine is a glacial deposit at the flank of a glacier, often constituted by debris from valley walls [16].?

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Karst environment, Culver D.C.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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Your search for skeleton (Keyword) returned 27 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 27
Fossilization of Bat Skeletons in the Carlsbad Caverns, 1963, Baker, James K.

Bear Skeleton Dated, 1969, Guilday John E. , Irving David C.

A Collection of the Bat, Chalinolobus Morio (Gray), From The Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia, 1971, Hall, Leslie S.

A collection of 23 live specimens and 26 complete skeletons of the bat, Chalinolobus - (Gray), was taken from two caves on the Nullarbor Plain. Tables of their forearm and skull measurements are presented. A comparison of the forearm measurements of Nullarbor specimens of C. morio with those of eastern Australian specimens of this species revealed a statistically significant difference (p less than 0.01). In Western Australia, C. morio appears to roost and breed in caves, while in eastern Australia, it is generally recognised as a tree dweller. Records of other species of bats collected on the Nullarbor Plain are given.


The adaptations to volvation of the external cephalic skeleton of Caecosphaeroma burgundum Dollfus, a subterranean waters Isopod., 1976, Marvillet Claude
The study of the cephalic capsule of Caecosphaeroma burgundum, a subterranean waters Isopod, demonstrates improved adaptations to volvation; these concern in a similar manner the other regions of the body, particularly the pleotelson. From a primitive aquatic Isopod structure, the head of this blind Spheromid has been completely fashioned by many mechanical factors: posterior margin of pleotelson providing support on the head, relation of anterior angles of the second pereionit and, above all, the mandibular palps and antennae which retract into two deep grooves of the face. The comparative study of the head of other volvational Isopods shows the importance of that "antennary factor", e.g. in Oniscoids, epigean Spheromids and some other subterranean waters Isopods (two Spheromids and one Cirolanid). This comparison shows that Caecosphaeroma burgundum is certainly the most specialized of all; it approaches perfection in volvation for it is the only one which rolls up into a hermetic sphere without outwards projections. Volvation seems to play a two-fold role. It is a mean of defence against predators used by single specimens and by copulating pairs, males and females being then associated in two concentric spheres. Furthermore, it is a very important way for passive dissemination allowing settlement of these Crustacea in distant subterranean waters.

Shallow-marine carbonate facies and facies models, 1985, Tucker M. E. ,
Shallow-marine carbonate sediments occur in three settings: platforms, shelves and ramps. The facies patterns and sequences in these settings are distinctive. However, one type of setting can develop into another through sedimentational or tectonic processes and, in the geologic record, intermediate cases are common. Five major depositional mechanisms affect carbonate sediments, giving predictable facies sequences: (1) tidal flat progradation, (2) shelf-marginal reef progradation, (3) vertical accretion of subtidal carbonates, (4) migration of carbonate sand bodies and (5) resedimentation processes, especially shoreface sands to deeper subtidal environments by storms and off-shelf transport by slumps, debris flows and turbidity currents. Carbonate platforms are regionally extensive environments of shallow subtidal and intertidal sedimentation. Storms are the most important source of energy, moving sediment on to shoreline tidal flats, reworking shoreface sands and transporting them into areas of deeper water. Progradation of tidal flats, producing shallowing upward sequences is the dominant depositional process on platforms. Two basic types of tidal flat are distinguished: an active type, typical of shorelines of low sediment production rates and high meteorologic tidal range, characterized by tidal channels which rework the flats producing grainstone lenses and beds and shell lags, and prominent storm layers; and a passive type in areas of lower meteorologic tidal range and higher sediment production rates, characterized by an absence of channel deposits, much fenestral and cryptalgal peloidal micrite, few storm layers and possibly extensive mixing-zone dolomite. Fluctuations in sea-level strongly affect platform sedimentation. Shelves are relatively narrow depositional environments, characterized by a distinct break of slope at the shelf margin. Reefs and carbonate sand bodies typify the turbulent shelf margin and give way to a shelf lagoon, bordered by tidal flats and/or a beach-barrier system along the shoreline. Marginal reef complexes show a fore-reef--reef core--back reef facies arrangement, where there were organisms capable of producing a solid framework. There have been seven such phases through the Phanerozoic. Reef mounds, equivalent to modern patch reefs, are very variable in faunal composition, size and shape. They occur at shelf margins, but also within shelf lagoons and on platforms and ramps. Four stages of development can be distinguished, from little-solid reef with much skeletal debris through to an evolved reef-lagoon-debris halo system. Shelf-marginal carbonate sand bodies consist of skeletal and oolite grainstones. Windward, leeward and tide-dominated shelf margins have different types of carbonate sand body, giving distinctive facies models. Ramps slope gently from intertidal to basinal depths, with no major change in gradient. Nearshore, inner ramp carbonate sands of beach-barrier-tidal delta complexes and subtidal shoals give way to muddy sands and sandy muds of the outer ramp. The major depositional processes are seaward progradation of the inner sand belt and storm transport of shoreface sand out to the deep ramp. Most shallow-marine carbonate facies are represented throughout the geologic record. However, variations do occur and these are most clearly seen in shelf-margin facies, through the evolutionary pattern of frame-building organisms causing the erratic development of barrier reef complexes. There have been significant variations in the mineralogy of carbonate skeletons, ooids and syn-sedimentary cements through time, reflecting fluctuations in seawater chemistry, but the effect of these is largely in terms of diagenesis rather than facies

Pollen and Other Microfossils in Pleistocene Speleothems, Kartchner Caverns, Arizona, 1999, Davis, O. K.
Pollen and other microfossils have been recovered from six carbonate speleothems in three Kartchner Caverns rooms: Grand Central Station (samples T2, T3, T4), the Bathtub Room (T11, T12), and Granite Dells (T16). The carbonate samples were dated from 194-76 Ka. The pollen concentration is greatest (~2 grain/cm?) in sample T11, which has many layers of clastic sediment, and the concentration is least in T4 (~0.05 grain/cm?), which has few mud layers. Therefore, the pollen was probably present in sediments washed into the cave, perhaps during floods. Although the pollen abundance in sample T4 is too low for confident interpretation, modern analogs for the five other samples can be found on the Colorado Plateau in areas that today are wetter and colder than the Kartchner Caverns locality. Agave pollen in samples T2 and T4 indicates that this important source of nectar was in the area during at least the latter part of the Pleistocene. Two orobatid mite exoskeletons recovered in speleothem T4 were probably washed into the cave with the pollen and mud trapped in the speleothems.

Role of stratigraphic elements in speleogenesis: the speleoinception concept, 2000, Lowe D. J.
Inception, the earliest phase of cave development, may begin during diagenesis. Within sedimentary rock sequences inception is generally related to specific favorable horizons or zones within the rock mass. These relatively thin inception horizons tend to display atypical chemical and/or physical properties, compared to the primary properties of the bulk of potentially cavernous rock successions. Commonly they correspond to depositional breaks or interruptions, particularly boundaries between major depositional cycles. Thus, according to the Inception Horizon Hypothesis, inception in sedimentary sequences (as typified by carbonate rocks) is inevitably related to, and guided by, thin relatively impure layers within thicker, otherwise pure beds, or at boundaries between impure and pure lithologies. Growth of incipient voids occurs potentially across the full lateral extent of inception horizons, generally very slowly during extended timescales. Growth may progress simultaneously at more than one stratigraphic level in a sequence, in deeply buried, confined or artesian conditions. Voids along individual inception horizons can be linked hydrologically by others that form concurrently or subsequently along tectonic or lithogenetic fissures. Later, interference between the imprinted inception framework and evolving surface landscapes leads to structurally advantageous elements of the potential three dimensional network being selected, linked and enlarged to form the skeletons of developing cave systems.

Studies on the cranial osteology of the blind catfish Horoglanis krishnai Menon (Pisces, Clariidae), 2001, Mercy T. V. Anna, N. Pillai Krishna.
Horaglanis krishnai Menon is a blind catfish inhabiting the dug- out wells at Kottayam, Kerala, South India. Studies on the cranial osteology of the fish show that the bones on the skull are firmly articulated. The frontoparietal fontanella is very large so that the cranium virtually lacks a roof. The sphenotics and alisphenoids are hardly recognizable and the orbital bones are entirely lacking. In osteological features H. krishnai closely resembles Uegitglanis zammaroni. But in H. krishnai the orbital bones are further reduced or even absent. The fontanella is larger than that of any other known catfish. These two species must have evolved from the same ancester and have taken up nearly identical ways of life. The difference between the skeletons of these two appears to be largely dependent on the relative size of the frontoparietal fontanella. Its greater development in H. krishnai brought about a suppression or reduction of some of the bones clearly visible in Uegitglanis. It would appear that the modification initiated in Uegitglanis gatered momentum in Horaglanis. These two fishes form a group distinct from clariids and bagrids but form a connecting link between the two.

The first discovery of a complete skeleton of a fossil orang-utan in a cave of the Hoa Binh Province, Vietnam, 2001, Bacon Am, Long Vt,
Here we provide a description of the first complete adult fossil orang-utan skeleton from the Asian mainland. This specimen, and remains of a juvenile orang, were collected in a late Pleistocene cavern in the Hoa Binh Province of The Socialist Republic of Vietnam. The results confirm the suggestions by Hooijer (1948) Zool. Meded. Leiden 29, 175-301 and later by Schwartz et al. (1995) Anthrop. Pap. Am. Mus. Nat. I-list. 76, 1-24, that ancient orang-utans had bigger teeth than those of modem Pongo pygmaeus (P. p. pygmaeus and P. p. abelii), while the dental morphology is similar. Body proportions of the adult individual of Hoa Binh show a large skull with very large teeth but proportionally a small body. This individual is also singular in having high intermembral. and brachial indices, in comparison with those of modem subspecies.

A Pleistocene Tapir and Associated Mammals from the Southwestern Ozark Highland, 2002, Czaplewski, N. J. , Puckette, W. L. , Russell, C.
A mud deposit in Sassafras Cave near Stilwell, Oklahoma, produced a small assemblage of fossil vertebrates including an unidentified salamander and the mammals Myotis sp., Lasionycteris noctivagans, Pipistrellus subflavus, Tamias striatus, Peromyscus sp., Reithrodontomys sp., Microtus sp., and Tapirus veroensis. The fossiliferous mud deposit is a stream terrace containing abundant red clay accumulated behind roof fall and breakdown boulders that temporarily dammed the main stream-passage of the cave. The tapir fossils indicate a late Rancholabrean (late Pleistocene) age for the deposit. This is the first report of a tapir from the Oklahoma Ozark Highland and only the second report of Pleistocene megafauna from a cave in eastern Oklahoma. The tapir is represented by a partial skeleton with some of the distal leg bones articulated in life position in the deposit. The animal probably died while it was standing or laying in the mud, possibly after falling into the cave or walking in through an entrance that had a different configuration in the Pleistocene than the present sinkhole entrance

The scapulocoracoid of an early triassic stem-frog from Poland, 2002, Borsukbialynicka M, Evans Se,
The scapulocoracoid of Czatkobatrachus polonicus Evans and Borsuk-Bialynicka, 1998, a stem-frog from the Early Triassic karst locality of Czatkowice (Southern Poland), is described. The overall type of scapulocoracoid is plesiomorphic, but the subcircular shape and laterally oriented glenoid is considered synapomorphic of Salientia. The supraglenoid foramen is considered homologous to the scapular cleft of the Anura. In Czatkobatrachus, the supraglenoid foramen occupies an intermediate position between that of the early tetrapod foramen and the scapular cleft of Anura. The cleft scapula is probably synapomorphic for the Anura. In early salientian phylogeny, the shift in position of the supraglenoid foramen may have been associated with an anterior rotation of the forelimb. This change in position of the forelimb may reflect an evolutionary shift from a mainly locomotory function to static functions (support, balance, eventually shock-absorption). Laterally extended limbs may have been more effective than posterolateral ones in absorbing landing stresses, until the specialised shock-absorption pectoral mechanism of crown-group Anura had developed. The glenoid shape and position, and the slender scapular blade, of Czatkobatrachus, in combination with the well-ossified joint surfaces on the humerus and ulna, all support a primarily terrestrial rather than aquatic mode of life. The new Polish material also permits clarification of the pectoral anatomy of the contemporaneous Madagascan genus Triadobatrachus

Some 19th century visitors to caves in Peninsular Malaysia, 2002, Price, Liz

Malaysian caves have been known to man since prehistoric times, when they were used as shelters, campsites or places of refuge. The oldest remains found in Peninsular Malaysia are a human skeleton dated at 11.000 years old. But it wasnot until the 19th century that records appear of caves being visited, generally by European visitors for recreation, curiosity or research. Research generally began in the 1880's, mainly by British colonial officers stationed in Malaya. The caves at Batu Caves were "discovered' and made known to Europeans in 1878. This article lists some of the visitors and describes some of the early research.


A partial short-faced bear skeleton from an Ozark cave with comments on the paleobiology of the species, 2003, Schubert, B. W. , Kaufmann, J. E.
Portions of an extinct giant short-faced bear, Arctodus simus, were recovered from a remote area within an Ozark cave, herein named Big Bear Cave. The partially articulated skeleton was found in banded silt and clay sediments near a small entrenched stream. The sediment covered and preserved skeletal elements of low vertical relief (e.g., feet) in articulation. Examination of a thin layer of manganese and clay under and adjacent to some skeletal remains revealed fossilized hair. The manganese in this layer is considered to be a by-product of microorganisms feeding on the bear carcass. Although the skeleton was incomplete, the recovered material represents one of the more complete skeletons for this species. The stage of epiphyseal fusion in the skeleton indicates an osteologically immature individual. The specimen is considered to be a female because measurements of teeth and fused postcranial elements lie at the small end of the size range for A. simus. Like all other bears, the giant short-faced bear is sexually dimorphic. A review of A. simus records revealed that only small individuals have been recovered from cave deposits. This association of small A. simus specimens with caves suggests that females used these subterranean shelters for denning.

Unusual injury of the moose's jawbone, found in Franc-losovo brezno" shaft above Glažuta near Ribnica (Slovenia), 2004, Jamnik, Pavel

The article deals with unusual bone damage with rounded edges, found on the lower jawbone of a European moose. The remains of its skeleton were discovered by speleologists in the shaft above Glažuta. This damage differs from those, caused by nature in caves and sediments. Small mammals leave different tooth marks when gnawing bones. Maybe the damage was caused by snails? The assumption that snails damage fossil bones was first presented in case of the holes in fossilized Rhinoceros bones from Dolarjeva jama at Logatec.


In Situ taphonomic investigation of Pleistocene Large Mammal Bone Deposits from the Ossuaries, Victoria Fossil Cave, Naracoorte, South Australia, 2006, Reed E. H.
The Ossuaries within the Victoria Fossil Cave (5U-1) contain a large, virtually untouched deposit of Pleistocene vertebrates. Discovered in the early 1970s, the chamber has been left unexcavated as a reference section of the cave and contains taphonomic features analogous to the formation of other large deposits such as the Fossil Chamber. This paper presents the results of an in situ taphonomic investigation of large mammal fossils from The Ossuaries. The results suggest The Ossuaries acted as a pitfall trap for a range of large Pleistocene mammals, in particular kangaroos. Once accumulated, the skeletons of these animals were subject to burial and dispersal by water and modification by trampling and termite gnawing. The presence of articulated material suggests many animals survived their initial fall, only to wander further into the cave and perish at some distance from the entrance.

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