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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That incrustation is 1. deposition of a crust (of calcite, etc.) upon an object by precipitation from water oversaturated with salts (calcium bicarbonate, etc.) [20]. 2. the deposition of mineral matter by water [16]. synonyms: (french.) incrustation; (german.) krustenbildung; (greek.) epiphlioma; (italian.) incrostazione; (russian.) obrazovanie natecnih kor; (spanish.) incrustcion; (turkish.) kabuk baglama, kabuklasma; (yugoslavian.) inkrustacija.?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for spring flow (Keyword) returned 30 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 30
The Reservoir Theory of Spring Flow, 1958, Vineyard, Jerry

Relation dbit / niveau de la mer de l'mergence littorale d'Almyros Agios Nikolaos (Crte, Grce), 1983, Bezes C. , Joseph C.
RELATION FLOW-SEA LEVEL OF SALT KARSTIC RESURGENCE BY MULTIPLE REGRESSION WITH THE WATER TABLE - The Amlyros Agios Nikolaos spring is a brackish karstic resurgence on the eastern coast of Crete. Its flow varies in the reverse order versus the sea level. The circulation of the out effect recession curve of the spring was done with the building of a multiple regression between the sea level, the spring flow and the water table. An adjustment about the mean sea level ensures the preservation of outflow.

Origin of the epeirogenic uplift of Pliocene-Pleistocene beach ridges in Florida and development of the Florida karst, 1984, Opdyke Neil D. , Spangler D. P. , Smith D. L. , Jones D. S. , Lindquist R. C. ,
Marine fossils of Pleistocene age are known to occur in beach ridges near the border of northern Florida and southern Georgia at elevations of between 42 and 49 m above mean sea level. No evidence exists for a massive melt-off of glacial ice, which would be required to raise sea level to these elevations. Florida, therefore, must have been uplifted epeirogenically during the Pleistocene. Measurement of dissolved solids in Florida's springs demonstrates that the karst area is losing a minimum of 1.2 X 10 6 m 3 /yr of limestone through spring flow, the equivalent of 1 m of surficial limestone every 38,000 yr. This loss has led to an isostatic uplift of the north-central part of the Florida peninsula of at least 36 m during the Pleistocene and Holocene, which agrees with observed elevations of marine terraces.--Modified journal abstract

Regional scale transport in a karst aquifer, 1. Component separation of spring flow hydrographs, 1989, Dreiss S. J.

Le karst du canyon du Lobos et son fonctionnement hydrogologique (Soria, Espagne), 1996, Sanzperez, E.
The massif of River Lobos, NW of the Iberian Range, is characterised by an important karst crossed by a canyon 26 km long. This canyon was dug into the Cretaceous limestones from a gradually eroded Neogene impervious cover by allogenic waters. The Cretaceous aquifer is drained by La Galiana spring. The general characteristics of the karstic relief and its hydrogeological functioning are descri-bed in this study. La Galiana spring is simulated by a mathematical model of precipitation-water flow. The results show a 4 to 5 day delay between precipi-tation and the spring flow.

Karst and hydrogeology of Lebanon, 1997, Edgell Hs,
Karst is very well-developed in Lebanon in thick, exposed, fractured and folded Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Eocene carbonates, as well as in localized, coastal Miocene limestones. This karstification not only results from the predominant calcareous lithology, but is also caused by the high, northerly trending ranges of he country, which cause abundant precipitation, as heavy rain and thick snow, to fall on Mt. Lebanon, Jabal Barouk, Jabal Niha, and Mt. Hermon. Lesser amounts fall on the Anti-Lebanon, Beqa'a Valley and the coastal hills of the country. Some 80% of precipitation occurs from November through February. The karst water emerges from five first-magnitude springs (Ain ez Zarqa (11 m(3)/sec), Ain Anjar (max. 10m(3)/sec), Nabaa Ouazzani (max. 6m(3)/sec), Nabaa Arbaain (mau. 3 m(3)/sec) and Nabaa Barouk (max. 3m(3)/sec), plus hundreds of second-and third-magnitude springs, and thousands of smaller springs. The large springs are all karstic and contribute to 13 perennial springs in the main Lebanese ranges, and 2 in the Anti-Lebanon. These include major rivers, such as the Nahr el Litani, Nahr el Assi (Orontes) and Nabr el Hasbani (upper Jordan River). More than two-thirds of the area of Lebanon (i.e. 6900 km(2)) is karstified and includes surface karst features, such as poljes, uvalas, dolines, blind valleys, natural bridges, and ponors, as well as smaller features, like karren and hoodoos. Subsurface karst features include many types of solutional shafts and galleries, grottoes, subsurface lakes and rivers and most types of speleothems. There are at least 15 aquifers in Lebanon, of which 14 are in karstified carbonate strata. The 1700m thick limestone/dolomite core of the ranges and over 2000m thickness of flanking, or overlying, Cretaceous limestones provide the majority of these aquifers, while significant aquifers are also found in thick Eocene limestones. High transmissivity values (T = or > 1.83 x 10(-1) m(2)) occur in these karstic aquifers, as is shown by the rapid decline in spring flow over the dry summer and autumn months, and their very quick recharge by winter and spring rains and heavy snow on the Lebanese ranges

Parameter identification in double-continuum models applied to karst aquifers., 1997, Mohrlok U. , Kienie J. , Teutsch G.
One modelling approach which proved successful in describing the groundwater flow within karst terraines is based on the double-continuum concept. This concept was first introduced by Teutsch (1988) and subsequently used by Teutsch & Sauter (1991), Sauter (1992), Lang (1995), Mohrlok (1996) and others to describe the ambivalent characteristics of karst aquifers. However, the approach has the drawback that the double-continuum model parameters can be determined only through model calibration (inverse approach), i.e. so far the model parameters cannot be related directly to physical field measurements. Therefore, in order to develop a better understanding of the physical significance of hydraulic parameters within double-continuum systems, a detailed numerical modeling study was conducted. For this purpose a number of synthetic but realistic karst aquifer network geometries were generated and analysed. The response of the karst network to recharge events was simulated using a detailed discrete fracture flow model with the resulting head and spring flow variographs being subsequently assumed as field measurements. This 'measured' data was then used for the calibration of a double-continuum model and the resulting parameters were compared to the original karst network geometry data. This comparison was used to develop mathematical/physical relationships between the discrete karst network geometry representing reality and the double-continuum parameter representation of it.

Contribution of correlation and spectral analyses to the regional study of a large karst aquifer (Charente, France), 1998, Larocque M. , Mangin A. , Razack M. , Banton O. ,
The purpose of the study is to demonstrate that correlation and spectral analyses can contribute to the regional study of a large karst aquifer. An example is presented for the La Rochefoucauld karst aquifer (Charente, France). Different types of spatially distributed time series provide valuable spatio-temporal information for the karat aquifer. The available time series consist of the spring flow rates, the flow rates at different locations in sinking streams, the piezometric levels, the electrical conductivity and temperature of the water, the atmospheric pressure and the precipitation The analysis of the flow rates at the springs shows that the aquifer empties very slowly and has a large storage capacity. Hydrodynamic links were established between three of the four rivers flowing on the aquifer and the springs. The results also demonstrate the important spatial heterogeneity of the aquifer and indicate that the most rapid flow occurs in the northern part of the aquifer. Hourly piezometric and electrical conductivity time series indicate that the transmissivity of the aquifer varies when some conductive channels become desaturated during the low water period. The delays between the distributed recharge and the piezometric level, between the localized river input and the how rates at the springs and between the electrical conductivities in rivers and the main spring provide information on the travel times in the aquifer, The observation of earth tides and barometric effects indicate that this apparently unconfined aquifer has a confined behaviour. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

Quelques aspects des conditions de circulation des eaux souterraines dans les karsts du gypse des Alpes internes, 1999, Couturier Bernard, Fourneaux Jeanclaude, Sommeria Laure
The Triassic gypsum outcrops are widespread, in the French Inner Alps. They are often found in large heaps between two structural units. Karstic landforms with sinkholes and collapse zones are visible even when they are covered with glacial deposits or fallen rocks. There is also much evidence of underground flows, but the springs do not have any karstic characteristics. The water tracings (two examples) show that the local tectonics have a great influence in the subterranean circulation conditions. At "La Norma" in the Arc valley (Maurienne) the water infiltrated in a large sinkhole supplies several small springs after transit in a fissured aquifer. The spring flow is well regulated. At "Le Clou" in the upper Isre valley (Tarentaise) several sinkholes with loss of ephemeral streams during melting snow supply a large fissured aquifer. There is no spring with karstic features either. The water infiltrated in a sinkhole has been found in several springs during a very long period of time. Whereas the upper part of these aquifers are really like a karstic aquifer, with large stream channels, on the contrary the deeper part is like a fissured aquifer with large water dispersion and low velocity. The fissured and porous aquifer has a throttling action and explains the absence of true resurgence. The underground water flow is unbroken between the different aquifers but permeability decreases according to the depth. These phenomenon are in connection with tectonic activity and the interpenetration of the different geological formations at the bottom of the gypsum layer.

Regional groundwater flow model construction and wellfield site selection in a karst area, Lake City, Florida, 1999, Dufresne Dp, Drake Cw,
The city of Lake City is in the process of expanding their water supply facilities by 45 420 m(3) day(-1) (12 MGD) to meet future demands. One portion of wellfield site selection addressed here includes analysis of ambient groundwater quality and its potential for contamination. This study also addresses the potential impacts of groundwater withdrawals to existing legal users, wetlands, surface waters and spring flows. A regional groundwater flow model (MODFLOW) was constructed using existing hydrogeologic data from state and federal agencies in order to simulate the existing hydrologic conditions of this karst area and to predict withdrawal impacts. The model was calibrated by matching potentiometric surface maps and spring flows to within reasonable ranges. Drawdowns in the Floridan and surficial aquifers predicted by the model show minimal impacts to existing legal users and only a 5% reduction in the flow at Ichetucknee Springs ca 21 km (13 miles) away. Due to the karstic nature of the Floridan aquifer here, the equivalent-porous-medium flow model constructed would not be appropriate for contaminant transport modeling. The groundwater flow model is, however, appropriate to represent hydraulic heads and recharge/discharge relationships on a regional scale. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

Determining karst transmissivities with inverse modeling and an equivalent porous media, 1999, Larocque M. , Banton O. , Ackerer P. , Razack M. ,
Flow simulation is difficult to implement in heterogeneous media such as karst aquifers, primarily because the structure of the rock is extremely complex and usually unknown. The aim of this study was to verify the possibility of using inverse modeling and an equivalent porous media to identify transmissivities in a slightly karstified aquifer, the La Rochefoucauld karst (Charente, France), Different simulation scenarios were tested: using two spatial discretizations with different finite-element cell sizes and using measured or interpolated heads. The inverse modeling was performed with the downscaling parameterization procedure, using a finite-element representation of bidimensional ground water flow. The inverse modeling converged satisfactorily with all scenarios: head residuals were small and spring flow rates and the river/aquifer exchanges were adequately stimulated. The scenario using small cells and measured heads generated a highly heterogeneous transmissivity field, indicating an overparameterization of the problem. The calibrated transmissivities and simulated heads of this scenario proved less reliable overall than those of the other scenarios. The use of interpolated heads generated more uniform transmissivities as a result of the head smoothing. A rotation of the initial parameter mesh showed that the scenarios using interpolated heads generate the most stable and reliable results. The scenarios with interpolated heads could therefore be used when head measurements are limited or are unevenly distributed over the aquifer. Overall, the calibrated transmissivities reproduced the entire range of transmissivities measured in the field using different methods. The results indicate that inverse modeling and an equivalent porous media can be used to determine transmissivities in a moderately karstified aquifer

Transient-state history matching of a karst aquifer ground water flow model, 2000, Larocque M. , Banton O. , Razack M. ,
Ground water flow modeling in a karst aquifer presents many difficulties. In particular, the hydrodynamic properties and the now behavior can vary over time. History matching of transient-state conditions is required to test the accuracy of the model under varying hydrodynamic conditions. The objective of this study was to illustrate how transient-state conditions can be used to history match a ground water flow model of a large aquifer, the La Rochefoucauld karst (Charente, France). The model used a porous medium equivalent and was based on a steady-state calibration of hydraulic conductivities. The history match consisted of studying the simulated heads and spring flow rates to test the capacity of the model to reproduce different aspects of the aquifer behavior, The simulated heads and flow rates were analyzed as new data using correlation and spectral analyses to compare the temporal structures of the measured and simulated time series. The analyses provided information on the storage capacity of the aquifer, the input-output delays, the degree of correlation between input and output, and the length of the impulse response of the aquifer, These data were used to study the impact of the hypotheses underlying the model (hydraulic conductivities, storage coefficient, representation of rivers, use of a porous medium equivalent). The results show that the model adequately simulates the overall behavior of the studied aquifer, The model can be used under variable hydrodynamic conditions to simulate ground water flow on a regional scale. This case study illustrates how a complete history match of a simplified representation of reality can lead to an adequate mathematical tool

Climate-change impacts in a regional karst aquifer, Texas, USA, 2000, Loaiciga H. A. , Maidment D. R. , Valdes J. B. ,
Climate-change scenarios were created from scaling factors derived from several general circulation models to assess the likely impacts of aquifer pumping on the water resources of the Edwards Balcones Fault Zone (BFZ) aquifer, Texas, one of the largest aquifer systems in the United States. Historical climatic time series in periods of extreme water shortage (1947-1959), near-average recharge (1978-1989), and above-average recharge (1975-1990) were scaled to 2 x CO2 conditions to create aquifer recharge scenarios in a wanner climate. Several pumping scenarios were combined with 2 x CO2 climate scenarios to assess the sensitivity of water resources impacts to human-induced stresses on the Edwards BFZ aquifer. The 2 x CO2 climate change scenarios were linked to surface hydrology and used to drive aquifer dynamics with alternative numerical simulation models calibrated to the Edwards BFZ aquifer, Aquifer simulations indicate that, given the predicted growth and water demand in the Edwards BFZ aquifer region, the aquifer's ground water resources appear threatened under 2 x CO2 climate scenarios. Our simulations indicate that 2 x CO2 climatic conditions could exacerbate negative impacts and water shortages in the Edwards BFZ aquifer even if pumping does not increase above its present average level. The historical evidence and the results of this article indicate that without proper consideration to variations in aquifer recharge and sound pumping strategies, the water resources of the Edwards BFZ aquifer could be severely impacted under a warmer climate. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

Karst hydrogeology of Kusluk-Dilmetas karst springs, Van-Eastern Turkey, 2001, Ozler H. M. ,
Permian marbles and recrystallised limestone nappes outcrop in the Artos Mountain range and comprise an aquifer with a small storage reservoir. Carbonate units are underlain by the impervious Yuksekova ophiolites. Between the marble and ophiolites, there is a transition zone by the northward thrusting, which varies between 500-1,000 m thickness. Fissures and fractures systems are well-developed in this transition zone because of the effects of tectonic movement, and extensive karstification has resulted in a high infiltration although its storage capacity is low. Because of the impermeable ophiolites at the base, groundwater discharges as springs flowing from the plane of the thrust faults. Numerous karst springs (48 springs) issue from this fissured and fractured zone, which are characterised by small discharge rates, a long residence time, and well-regulated spring flows. In addition, a selective enlargement is observed from west to east, which is greatly effected by strike-slip faults. All these springs are mostly fed by snowmelt during 6 months of the year

Analysis of the maximum discharge of karst springs, 2001, Bonacci O,
Analyses are presented of the conditions that limit the discharge of some karst springs. The large number of springs studied show that, under conditions of extremely intense precipitation, a maximum value exists for the discharge of the main springs in a catchment, independent of catchment size and the amount of precipitation. Outflow modelling of karst-spring discharge is not easily generalized and schematized due to numerous specific characteristics of karst-flow systems. A detailed examination of the published data on four karst springs identified the possible reasons for the limitation on the maximum flow rate: (1) limited size of the karst conduit; (2) pressure flow; (3) intercatchment overflow; (4) overflow from the main spring-flow system to intermittent springs within the same catchment; (5) water storage in the zone above the karst aquifer or epikarstic zone of the catchment; and (6) factors such as climate, soil and vegetation cover, and altitude and geology of the catchment area. The phenomenon of limited maximum-discharge capacity of karst springs is not included in rainfall-runoff process modelling, which is probably one of the main reasons for the present poor quality of karst hydrological modelling

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