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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That kras; krs is a slavic word meaning bleak, waterless place, from which the term karst is derived [10]. see also karst.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
Engineering challenges in Karst, Stevanović, Zoran; Milanović, Petar
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy), Dimuccio, L.A.; Rodrigues, N.; Larocca, F.; Pratas, J.; Amado, A.M.; Batista de Carvalho, L.A.
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
See all featured articles from other geoscience journals

Search in KarstBase

Your search for bone (Keyword) returned 105 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 16 to 30 of 105
Fossil karst with Mesozoic bone breccia in Czatkowice (Cracow Upland, Poland), 1982, Paszkowski Mariusz, Wieczorek Jzef

Depositional history of the late Pleistocene limestones of the Kenya coast, 1984, Braithwaite Cjr,
The coastal limestones of Kenya extend approximately 180 km N-S from Malindi to the Tanzanian border. They are at least 20 m thick and may be subdivided into sedimentary units representing major periods of marine deposition punctuated by sub-aerial erosion. Their foundations are formed by thick fluvial and aeolian quartz sands but there is local evidence of marine deposition following these. In the main limestone unit, deposited about 240,000 years ago, initial high energy shallow-shelf deposition was replaced by quiet water sediments with scattered corals. Sea level stood about 8 m higher than at present. Quartzose sands were confined to western areas. A return to shallow water heralded a new phase of emergence and erosion, producing karst surfaces and sub-aerial sediments. These are overlain by herring-bone cross-bedded quartz-rich calcarenites which were the products of a tidally dominated shelf and, at Watamu and Wasini, pass upwards into aeolian dune deposits. However, these were also emersed and subject to karst erosion before deposition of a further widespread marine limestone. Within this, coral knolls are well developed. Much of the sediment accumulated in shallow water, but the ecological succession indicates that knolls were at times in deeper waters. These deposits formed about 125,000 years ago when sea level ultimately stood 15-20 m above its present position. More recently in the area sea level has again fallen. However, the descent was not continuous and pauses were marked by marine terrace formation and subsequent karst erosion with sub-aerial deposition. Brief reversals caused both terraces and sediments to be overlain by thin marine deposits. Sea level paused at its present position about 30,000 years ago when the present reef platform was probably defined. It continued to fall to a maximum of about-120 m before rising to its existing level 7000 years ago and beginning the current cycle of sediment accumulation

The Quaternary Bone Caves at Wallingford, Jamaica, 1985, Mcfarlane D. A. , Gledhill R. E.

Le karst de Bourgogne, 1988, Delance, J. H.
THE KARST OF BURGONDY (France) - Karst of Burgundy is located between karst of Paris Basin, to which it is connected by its western and northern margins and karst of Jura. The burgundian karst forms an original entity in close relationship with the geological structure of the area, which had defined its distribution and density and the system's amplitudes. Karst of Burgundy develops in calcareous marine formations of Jurassic and Upper Cretaceous (chalk). The karstic landscapes are remarkable by their abundant dry valleys. Caves are characterised by their shallow depths (less than 100m) and the important spreading of the active systems. They can be graded into three types: mesokarstic, holokarstic and cutaneous caves. Deepest and greatest caves (up to 22km) are of holokarstic type. In Burgundy, the majority of caving range from Miocene to Pleistocene; cutaneous caves were only developed during cold phases of Quaternary. Fillings of caves are important, the most interesting fillings are Quaternary bone breccias, rich in paleontological and prehistoric data.

Amblyrhiza and the Quaternary Bone Caves of Anguilla, British West Indies, 1989, Mcfarlane D. A. , Macphee R. D. E.

Karst origin of the upper erosion surface in the Northern Judean Mountains, Israel, 1993, Frumkin, A.
The upper erosion surface in the northern Judean Mountains is actively karstified, in the vadose zone and on the surface. The karst valleys become gradually covered with Terra Rossa which inhibits further denudation underneath the impermeable cover. Higher solution rates in the elevated areas keep the erosion surface relatively flat. The main characteristics of the area which dominate karst processes are fissured carbonate rocks with some insolubles and aeolian contribution, non arid climate and moderate relief. The erosion surface developed probably since the Oligocene regression. The Pleistocene uplift of the mountain backbone increased the relief and reduced the area of the karst plateau.

Karsting around for bones: Aborigines and karst caves in South Eastern Australia, 1993, Spate, Andy

Whilst there appears to be a popular belief that Australian Aborigines viewed caves with some trepidation there is much anecdotal and physical evidence that karst caves were used for occupation, art and funery practices. This paper reviews the past and modern literature on Aboriginal use of karst caves on the Tablelands and immediate surrounds. About ten occupation and a lesser number of disposition sites are known as are hand stencils and abstract engraved art. More representational art has been reported in the past and skeletal material of accidental or unknown origin reported widely. Dated sites are few ranging from about 1500 years BP to as old as 23000 years BP.


Emplacement and preservation of vertebrates in caves and fissures, 1994, Simms Michael J. ,
The sediments filling underground cavities and open fissures represent a major source of fossil vertebrate remains. The significance of such sites is disproportionate to the relatively small volume of sediment which they contain, and arises from the enhanced preservation, compared with surface sites, of both bones and sediments and the operation of one or more concentrative processes. Isolation of vertebrate material from temperature and humidity changes, scavenging and soil organisms greatly increases their preservation potential. Three main types of concentrative mechanism can be recognized: where the animals lived and died in that environment (biotic autochthonous); where the animal remains were transported into that environment by some biotic agency, such as a predator (biotic allochthonouns); and where the animal remains were introduced into that environment as a result of some abiotic process, such as flooding (abiotic allochthonous). The precise mechanism operating in a particular case may be deduced from a consideration of faunal composition, taphonomic criteria and geomorphological and sedimentological contexts, with each concentrative process being characterized by a distinctive combination of these

Bones of Puffinus lherminieri Lesson (Aves: Procellaridae) and Two Other Vertebrates from Cueva del Agua, Mona Island, Puerto Rico (West Indies), 1995, Nievesrivera Angel M. , Mylroie John E. , Mcfarlane Donald A.

Morphological affinities of the proximal ulna from Klasies River main site: Archaic or modern?, 1996, Churchill Se, Pearson Om, Grine Fe, Trinkaus E, Holliday Tw,
The Middle Stone Age (MSA) asociated hominids from Klasies River Mouth (KRM) have taken on a key role in debate about the origins of modern humans, with their craniofacial remains seen as either representing the earliest well-dated modern humans in southern Africa or orthognathic late archaic humans. Diagnostic postcranial remains from Klasies are few, but one specimen-a proximal right ulna from the lower SAS member-is useful For assessing the morphological affinities of these hominids. Canonical variates analysis using 14 proximal ulnar dimensions and comparative data from European, west Asian and African archaic humans, and Levantine Mousterian, European Upper Paleolithic, African Epipaleolithic and diverse recent modern human samples (many of recent African descent) were employed to assess the morphological affinities of this specimen. Results suggest an archaic total morphological pattern for the Klasies ulna. Analysis of diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry reveals an ulnar shaft with relatively thick cortical bone, but the specimen cannot be readily distinguished from Neandertals or early anatomically modem humans on the basis of shaft cross-sectional properties. If the isolated ulna from Klasies is indicative of the general postcranial morphology of these hominids, then the MSA-associated humans from KRM may not be as modern as has been claimed from the craniofacial material. It ii: possible also that the skeletal material from KRM reflects mosaic evolution-retention of archaic postcranial characteristics. perhaps indicating retention of archaic habitual behavior patterns, in hominids that were becoming craniofacially modern. (C) 1996 Academic Press Limited

Morphology of the border cave hominid ulna and humerus, 1996, Pearson O. M. , Grine F. E. ,
Hominid bones from Border Cave (BC) have been the subject of controversy with regard to the question of modern human origins. New dating assays suggest that while some of the BC remains are of comparatively recent age (i.e. < 20 kyr), several postcranial fragments derive from the Middle Stone Age (MSA) layers. Among the latter, a proximal ulna in comparable to one from the MSA at Klasies River Mouth, in that both have an archaic pattern of morphology in the relative height of the coronoid and olecranon processes. This configuration appears to characterize Neandertals, and is displayed also by more ancient African ulnae. The BC humeral diaphysis has moderately thick cortical bone, but us otherwise unremarkable. The proximal ulnar morphology might suggest that the MSA inhabitants of South Africa engaged in activities similar to those of Neandertals and other postcranially archaic hominids. If the modern-looking BC-1 cranium in contemporaneous with the BC postcranial bones, this would bear testament to the mosaic nature of human evolution. Alternatively, if BC-1 proves to be of recent derivation, and the postcrania are as old as the base of the BC MSA sequence has been claimed to be (c. 195 kyr), they might have been associated with more archaic crania (perhaps similar to Florisbad). Final resolution of these questions awaits determination of the absolute ages of the BC-1 cranium and the BC postcranial bones

Osteological Comparison of Prehistoric Native Americans From Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee Mortuary Caves, 1997, Boyd Jr. , C. C. , Boyd, D. C.
The remains of at least 160 individuals from 15 burial caves in Southwest Virginia and East Tennessee are compared in terms of their temporal and spatial context, age and sex profiles, incidence of pathologies, and degree and type of postmortem alteration of bone. Individuals appear to have been interred predominantly as primary inhumations. Dental pathologies are frequent for these Late Woodland/Mississippian period interments, but overall levels of nutritional stress and trauma appear low. This suggests a generally good level of health for these prehistoric Native Americans.

Virginia Burial Caves: An Inventory of a Desecrated Resource, 1997, Hubbard Jr. , David A. , Barber, M. B.
In an ongoing inventory of Virginia cave resources, 23 burial caves have been field documented by the Marginella Burial Cave Project (MBCP). All but one site have been vandalized to varying degrees. In addition to the burial resource inventory, goals of the MBCP include measures for site protection and education. Problems have been encountered by the MBCP in attaining these goals. The sensitive and sacred nature of these cave resources, however, warrant limiting site specific discussions to protected sites. One burial cave in Montgomery County and two in Lee County are protected by gates because of recent disturbances. Adams Cave (44MY482) served as a party cave, but was not known as a burial site until a student brought a human mandible and two long bone fragments to a college professor and an investigation ensued. Indian Burial Cave (44LE11) was known locally as a burial cave and has suffered desecration for decades. Bone Cave (44LE169) was known locally as a burial site, mistakenly attributed to black slaves, but MBCP and Phase II archaeological investigations documented this Native American burial site and provided information that helped to alter the path of a road realignment through the cave. The examination and analysis of these and other Virginia caves by the MBCP has resulted in significant new knowledge about the use and distribution of caves as Native American burial sites.

Stable Isotope Analysis of Human Remains: A Tool for Cave Archaeology, 1997, Trimble, C. C. , Macko, S. A.
Stable isotope analysis of human remains is a research tool that can provide paleodiet information for archaeological sites, such as caves, where traditional evidence may be missing or out of context. Unlike other lines of evidence, the stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in human bone reflect the chemistry of the diet and therefore provide a direct measure of the foods consumed. As an example, the data from isotopic analyses of bone from the Mer site (44LE280), a cave in Lee County, Virginia, are presented. Although this site lacks faunal and floral remains to provide basic information about the availability and potential utilization of food resources, the stable isotope data from other sites throughout Virginia and North Carolina provide a basis for comparison. The d13C and d15N values for the cave burials suggest a diet composed of primarily C4 plant proteins and some terrestrial animal proteins.

Dinosaurs and other tetrapods in an Early Cretaceous bauxite-filled fissure, northwestern Romania, 1997, Benton Mj, Cook E, Grigorescu D, Popa E, Tallodi E,
The bauxite mine at Cornet near Oradea in northwestern Romania produced thousands of bones in an excavation in 1978, mainly from ornithopod dinosaurs and rarer pterosaurs. Bird specimens reported previously from this fauna are equivocal. The fossils are disarticulated bones in good condition which occur highly concentrated in lenses within bauxite clays, which are dated as Berriasian (earliest Cretaceous). The bauxite represents detrital material washed into deep fissures and caves formed within a karst of uplifted Tithonian (latest Jurassic) marine limestones. The bones are generally uniform in size and shape, and they are abraded, evidence for considerable transport and for winnowing of the deposit. The area was one of several islands on the northern shore of Tethys, and it was inundated by the sea later in the Early Cretaceous. There is evidence for insular adaptations in the dinosaur faunas. The ornithopod dinosaurs may include several taxa, but they are smaller on average than an assemblage of typical Wealden ornithopods, perhaps because of dwarfing on the island. In addition, sauropods are absent and theropods are barely represented in the fauna. The fauna is geographically significant since it shows relationships with western Europe and with Asia

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