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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That alluvial is pertaining to or composed of alluvium or deposited by a stream or running water [6]. also applies to material lining the floor of a cave and deposits at the mouth of a spring.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for petroleum (Keyword) returned 48 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 16 to 30 of 48
Nang Nuan oil field, B6/27, Gulf of Thailand: karst reservoirs of meteoric or deep-burial origin?, 2000, Heward A. P. , Chuenbunchom S. , Makel G. , Marsland D. , Spring L. ,
Karst reservoirs in the Chumphon Basin of the Gulf of Thailand have produced oil at well rates exceeding 10 000 BBL/d. Meteorically karstified buried hills were recognized as a potential exploration play. The Nang Nuan discovery well appeared to confirm such a play, and the concept prevailed despite the accumulation of contrary and unusual data. By the time a subsequent well had produced nearly 4 x 10(6) BBL oil, there was a desire to better understand the prospectivity of the concession. The accumulated data indicate that the highs are probably syn-rift horsts and inversion features. Karst reservoirs occur in Ratburi carbonates, and Mesozoic and Tertiary clastics, apparently unrelated to subaerial exposure. The karstification appears to be primarily of deep-burial origin, as indicated by the nature of the karst, substantial pore volumes that are difficult to account for, and temperature and flow anomalies consistent with active geothermal circulation. There are granites and hot springs in the vicinity, and abundant CO2 in this and neighbouring basins. Such deep-burial karst reservoirs have different implications for reserves estimation, prospect ranking and well completions

Characteristics of distribution and transport of petroleum contaminants in fracture-karst water in Zibo Area, Shandong Province, China, 2000, Zhu X. Y. , Liu J. L. , Zhu J. J. , Chen Y. D. ,
Fracture-karst water is an important water resource for the water supply in North China. Petroleum contamination is one of the most problematic types of the groundwater pollution. The characteristics of distribution and transport of the petroleum contaminants in fracture-karst water are different from those in porous water. The flow velocity of fracture-karst water is much faster than the velocity of porous water on an average. Therefore, contaminant transport in fracture-karst water is an absolute advection-dominated problem. The plume of the petroleum contamination may extend to several kilometers from pollution sources. It was not caused by the oil pool floating on the water table but by the oil components dissolved and scattered in groundwater. The distribution of the petroleum contaminants over space are concentrated in the strong conductive zone on the plane. On the vertical section the highest concentration of the oil contaminants appeared in the strata where the contamination sources were located. The concentrations of the oil contaminants in wells changed greatly over time. Therefore, the curves of concentration versus time fluctuated greatly. The reasons are as follows. (a) Fracture-karst water has a very great velocity. (b) Local flow fields which were caused by pumping and stoppage in some wells changed frequently. (c) In fracture-karat aquifer the transport channels are complicated. (d) Residual oil in vadose zone was leached after rainfall, it is of great practical value for the control and remediation of petroleum contamination in fracture-karst aquifer to understand those characteristics

Water and Land-Use Problems in Areas of Conduit Aquifers, 2000, Aley T.
Water and land-use problems occur in areas of conduit aquifers because of the intimate interactions which exist between the surface and the subsurface. Water is the agent which most directly links the surface and subsurface. Karst areas have unique natural resource problems which have major economic consequences. Soils are often of poor agricultural quality. Surface water supplies are limited. Groundwater supplies are often limited, expensive to exploit, and highly subject to contamination because of ineffective natural cleansing processes. The quality of water in a karst spring or well is largely determined by land-use conditions in the recharge area which contributes the water to that well or spring. The range of land-use activities which can adversely impact groundwater quality in karst aquifers is extensive. Municipal and on-site sewage systems, petroleum storage and distribution facilities, and highways and pipelines have all created wide-spread problems. Sinkhole collapses have occurred beneath sewage lagoons, highways, and other features. Recommended resource protection strategies for karst areas are identified. Preventing problems is crucial. Recharge area delineation provides fundamental and essential data, and should be accompanied by hazard area mapping. Land use in karst areas must be tailored to site conditions.

Geochemical study of calcite veins in the Silurian and Devonian of the Barrandian Basin (Czech Republic): evidence for widespread post-Variscan fluid flow in the central part of the Bohemian Massif, 2000, Suchy V. , Heijlen W. , Sykorova I. , Muchez Ph. , Dobes P. , Hladikova J. , Jackova I. , Safanda J. , Zeman A.

Carbonate fracture cements in limestones have been investigated by fluid inclusion and stable isotope analysis to provide insight into fluid evolution and deformation conditions of the Barrandian Basin (Silurian–Devonian) of the Czech Republic. The fractures strike generally north–south and appear to postdate major Variscan deformation. The most common fracture cement is calcite that is locally accompanied by quartz, natural bitumen, dolomite, Mn-oxides and fluorite. Three successive generations of fracture-filling calcite cements are distinguished based on their petrographical and geochemical characteristics. The oldest calcite cements (Stage 1) are moderate to dull brown cathodoluminescent, Fe-rich and exhibit intense cleavage, subgrain development and other features characteristic of tectonic deformation. Less tectonically deformed, variable luminescent Fe-poor calcite corresponds to a paragenetically younger Stage 2 cement. First melting temperatures, Te, of two-phase aqueous inclusions in Stages 1 and 2 calcites are often around 2208C, suggesting that precipitation of the cements occurred from H2O–NaCl fluids. The melting temperature, Tm, has values between 0 and 25.88C, corresponding to a low salinity between 0 and 8.9 eq. wt% NaCl. Homogenization temperatures, Th, from calcite cements are interpreted to indicate precipitation at about 708C or less. No distinction could be made between the calcite of Stages 1 and 2 based on their fluid inclusion characteristics. In some Stage 2 cements, inclusions of highly saline (up to 23 eq. wt% NaCl) brines appear to coexist with low-salinity inclusions. The low salinity fluid possibly contains Na-, K-, Mg- and Ca-chlorides. The high salinity fluid has a H2O–NaCl–CaCl2 composition. Blue-to-yellow-green fluorescing hydrocarbon inclusions composed of medium to higher API gravity oils are also identified in some Stages 1 and 2 calcite cements. Stage 1 and 2 calcites have d 18O values between 213.2‰ and 27.2‰ PDB. The lower range of the calculated d 18O values of the ambient fluids (23.5‰ to 1 2.7‰ SMOW) indicate precipitation of these cements from deeply circulating meteoric waters. The presence of petroleum hydrocarbon inclusions in some samples is interpreted to reflect partial mixing with deeper basinal fluids. The paragenetically youngest Stage 3 calcite cement has only been encountered in a fewveins.These calcites are characterised by an intensely zoned luminescence pattern, with bright yellow and non-luminescent zones. Inclusions of Mn-oxides and siliceous sinters are commonly associated with Stage 3 calcite, which is interpreted to have precipitated from shallower meteoric waters. Regional structural analysis revealed that the calcite veins of the Barrandian basin belong to a large-scale system of north–south-trending lineaments that run through the territory of the Czech Republic. The veins probably reflect episodes of fluid migration that occurred along these lineaments during late stages of the Variscan orogeny


Diagenesis and porosity evolution of the Upper Silurian-lowermost Devonian West Point reef limestone, eastern Gaspe Belt, Quebec Appalachians, 2001, Bourque Pa, Savard Mm, Chi G, Dansereau P,
Diagenetic analysis based on cathodoluminescence petrography, cement stratigraphy, carbon and oxygen stable isotope geochemistry, and fluid inclusion microthermometry was used to reconstruct the porosity history and evaluate the reservoir potential of the Upper Silurian-Lower Devonian West Point limestone in the eastern part of the Gaspe Belt. The West Point limestone was investigated in two areas: 1) In the Chaleurs Bay Synclinorium, the limestone diagenesis of the lower and middle complexes of the Silurian West Point Formation was affected by repeated subaerial exposure related to late Ludlovian third-order eustatic low-stands, which coincided with the Salinic block tilting that produced the Salinic unconformity. The Anse McInnis Member (middle bank complex) underwent freshwater dissolution, and mixed marine and freshwater cementation during deposition. Concurrently, the underlying Anse a la Barbe and Gros Morbe members (lower mound and reef complex) experienced dissolution by fresh water percolating throughout the limestone succession. Despite this early development of karst porosity, subsequent meteoric-influenced cementation rapidly occluded all remaining pore space in the Gros Morbe, Anse a la Barbe, and Anse McInnis limestones. In contrast, the overlying Colline Daniel Member limestone (upper reef complex) does not show the influence of any freshwater diagenesis. Occlusion of its primary porosity occurred during progressive burial and was completed under a maximum burial depth of 1.2 kin. 2) In the Northern Outcrop Belt, the diagenesis of the Devonian pinnacle reefs of the West Point Formation followed a progressive burial trend. The primary pores of the reef limestone were not completely occluded before the reefs were buried at a significant depth (in some cases, to 6 km). Therefore, hydrocarbon migration in subsurface buildups before primary porosity occlusion might have created reservoirs. Moreover, the presence of gaseous hydrocarbons in Acadian-related veins attests to a hydrocarbon source in the area

Contaminant transport in karst aquifers., 2001, Vesper D. J. , Loop C. M. , White W. B.
Contaminants are easily injected into karst aquifers through sinking streams, sinkholes, or through open fractures and shafts in the carbonate rock. Transport of the contaminants through the aquifer is by a variety of mechanisms depending on the physical and chemical properties of the contaminant. Contaminants consist of (1) water soluble compounds, both organic and inorganic, (2) slightly soluble organic compounds, less dense than water (LNAPLs), (3) slightly soluble organic compounds, more dense than water (DNAPLs), (4) pathogens, (5) metals, and (6) trash. Water soluble compounds (e.g. nitrates, cyanides, carboxylic acids, phenols) move with the water. But rather than forming a plume spreading from the input point, the contaminated water forms linear stringers migrating down the conduit system toward the discharge point. LNAPLs (e.g. petroleum hydrocarbons) float on the water table and can migrate down the water table gradient to cave streams where they tend to pond behind obstructions. DNAPLs (e.g. chlorinated hydrocarbons), in contrast, sink to the bottom of the aquifer. In the conduit system, DNAPLs pond in low spots at the bottom of the conduit and infiltrate sediment piles. Transport of both LNAPL and DNAPL is dependent on storm flow which can force LNAPL through the system as plug flow and can move DNAPLs by mobilizing the sediment piles. Pathogens (viruses, bacteria, parasites) are transported through the karstic drainage system because of the absence of filtration and retain their activity for long distances. Metals (e.g. chromium, nickel, cadmium, mercury, and lead) tend to precipitate as hydroxides and carbonates in the neutral pH, carbonate rich water of the karst aquifer. Metal transport is mainly as particulates and as metal adsorbed onto small particulates such as clays and colloids. Metal transport is also episodic. Metals migrate down the flow path under flow conditions that take small particulates into suspension. Trash is carried into karst aquifers through sinkholes and sinking streams. It is, in effect, a form of clastic sediment, and can be carried deep into the conduit system where it can act as a source term for other contaminants leached from the trash.

Characteristics and genetic analysis of the deep-buried weathered-crust karst hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Lower Paleozoic group in the Tarim basin, 2002, Gu J. Y. , Zhang X. Y. , Fang H. ,
The genetic analysis of the deep-buried reservoirs of the Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks in the Tarim basin is a difficult task involving many factors. Firstly, the object of study is carbonate rocks, which have undergone a long term of modification. Secondly, the rocks are deeply buried with depths of 3800-7000 m in the Tarim basin. The primary reservoir properties formed in the deposition have been strongly modified during the deep burial process. Concurrently, the different burial depths in different areas result in diversities of burial temperature, pressure, underground water, hydrochemistry and various physicochemical changes, which further lead to differences in the diagenetic type, diagenetic property, diagenetic degree and their impacts on the reservoir properties. The Lower Paleozoic Cambrian and Ordovician carbonate reservoirs in the Tarim basin can be grouped into four types,.i.e., paleo-weathered-crust reservoirs, reef reservoirs, buried karst reservoirs and dolomite reservoirs. This paper presents a detailed discussion on the vertical and horizontal distribution characteristics, morphological division, reservoir properties and the efficiency in accumulating hydrocarbons of the paleo-weathered-crust type. Furthermore, its genesis is also analyzed. We proposed that the composition of the carbonate rocks, the tectonic movement with associated fractures and fissures, the paleomorphology and paleoclimate, the sea level fluctuation, and the protection of the pores and fissures by the deep burial diagenesis and burial dissolution are the main factors controlling the formation of the paleo-weathered-crust reservoirs. We also consider that the petroleum exploration of the Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks should be focused on the paleo-weathered-crust reservoirs

Contaminant transport in karst aquifers, 2003, Vesper D. J. , Loop C. M. , White W. B.

Contaminants are easily injected into karst aquifers through sinking streams, sinkholes, or through open fractures and shafts in the carbonate rock. Transport of the contaminants through the aquifer is by a variety of mechanisms depending on the physical and chemical properties of the contaminant. Contaminants consist of (1) water soluble compounds, both organic and inorganic, (2) slightly soluble organic compounds, less dense than water (LNAPLs), (3) slightly soluble organic compounds, more dense than water (DNAPLs), (4) pathogens, (5) metals, and (6) trash. Water soluble compounds (e.g. nitrates, cyanides, carboxylic acids, phenols) move with the water. But rather than forming a plume spreading from the input point, the contaminated water forms linear stringers migrating down the conduit system toward the discharge point. LNAPLs (e.g. petroleum hydrocarbons) float on the water table and can migrate down the water table gradient to cave streams where they tend to pond behind obstructions. DNAPLs (e.g. chlorinated hydrocarbons), in contrast, sink to the bottom of the aquifer. In the conduit system, DNAPLs pond in low spots at the bottom of the conduit and infiltrate sediment piles. Transport of both LNAPL and DNAPL is dependent on storm flow which can force LNAPL through the system as plug flow and can move DNAPLs by mobilizing the sediment piles. Pathogens (viruses, bacteria, parasites) are transported through the karstic drainage system because of the absence of filtration and retain their activity for long distances. Metals (e.g. chromium, nickel, cadmium, mercury, and lead) tend to precipitate as hydroxides and carbonates in the neutral pH, carbonate rich water of the karst aquifer. Metal transport is mainly as particulates and as metal adsorbed onto small particulates such as clays and colloids. Metal transport is also episodic. Metals migrate down the flow path under flow conditions that take small particulates into suspension. Trash is carried into karst aquifers through sinkholes and sinking streams. It is, in effect, a form of clastic sediment, and can be carried deep into the conduit system where it can act as a source term for other contaminants leached from the trash


Filamentous 'Epsilonproteobacteria' dominate microbial mats from sulfidic cave springs, 2003, Engel As, Lee N, Porter Ml, Stern La, Bennett Pc, Wagner M,
Hydrogen sulfide-rich groundwater discharges from springs into Lower Kane Cave, Wyoming, where microbial mats dominated by filamentous morphotypes are found. The full-cycle rRNA approach, including 16S rRNA gene retrieval and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), was used to identify these filaments. The majority of the obtained 16S rRNA gene clones from the mats were affiliated with the 'Epsilonproteobacteria' and formed two distinct clusters, designated LKC group I and LKC group II, within this class. Group I was closely related to uncultured environmental clones from petroleum-contaminated groundwater, sulfidic springs, and sulfidic caves (97 to 99% sequence similarity), while group II formed a novel clade moderately related to deep-sea hydrothermal vent symbionts (90 to 94% sequence similarity). FISH with newly designed probes for both groups specifically stained filamentous bacteria within the mats. FISH-based quantification of the two filament groups in six different microbial mat samples from Lower Kane Cave showed that LKC group II dominated five of the six mat communities. This study further expands our perceptions of the diversity and geographic distribution of 'Epsilonproteobacteria' in extreme environments and demonstrates their biogeochemical importance in subterranean ecosystems

Sedimentologic, diagenetic and tectonic evolution of the Saint-Flavien gas reservoir at the structural front of the Quebec Appalachians, 2003, Bertrand R, Chagnon A, Malo M, Duchaine Y, Lavoie D, Savard Mm,
The Beekmantown Group (Lower Ordovician) of the Saint-Flavien reservoir has produced 162x106 m3 (5.7 bcf) of natural gas between 1980 and 1994. The conversion of the field into gas storage was initiated in 1992 and the pool became operational in 1998. Integration of structural and sedimentologic features, carbonate and organic matter petrography and geochemistry for 13 drill holes is used to define a tectonic-sedimentologic-diagenetic model for porosity evolution in these reservoir dolostones. The Beekmantown Group consists of numerous fifth-order shallowing-upward cycles 1.0 to 7.0 m thick (average of 2.4 m). Each cycle consists of a basal shale deposited during the initial flooding of the platform which was subsequently covered by a shoaling succession of subtidal and intertidal limestones to intertidal dolostones. Early dolomitization has produced intercrystalline porosity and preserved some moldic pores in the intertidal facies. Near surface, post-dolomite karstification has created vugs that were subsequently filled by early marine calcite fibrous cement based on the {delta}18O and {delta}13C ratios of calcite. Early burial elements consist of horizontal stylolites, pyrite and sphalerite. Late migrated bitumen was thermally altered or vaporized as native coke under deep burial conditions exceeding 240{degrees}C, partly due to overthrusting of Appalachian nappes. Under these conditions, breccias and fractures were generated and subsequently filled with K-feldspar, quartz, illite, and xenomorphic and poikilotopic calcite. The {delta}18O of the poikilotopic calcite and homogenization temperature of coeval fluid inclusions indicate formation under high temperatures (Th about 260{degrees}C). Horizontal shear zones and marcasite-rich vertical stylolites were produced during folding and thrusting. Dissolution has preferentially affected late fracture-filling calcite and generated most of the actual porosity during or soon after the Taconian Orogeny. The relationship between the occurrence of smectite and this type of porosity indicates the low temperature condition of this dissolution (T <100{degrees}C). Porosity in the Saint-Flavien reservoir has been mostly produced by fracture-controlled, late to post-Taconian dissolution of early to late calcite in the intertidal dolomitic slightly porous facies at the top of rhythmic cycles that compose the Beekmantown Group

Types of karst-fractured and porous reservoirs in China's carbonates and the nature of the Tahe Oilfield in the Tarim Basin, 2004, Zhang K. , Wang D. R. ,
Almost all the oil and gas reservoirs developed in marine sedimentary strata of China have undergone processes of multi-phase reservoir formation and later modification. The irregular reservoirs are classified into three types as the Naxi, Tahe and Renqiu ones, increasing successively in the development degree of karstificated pores and fissures and the connection degree of independent reservoirs. In these reservoirs, the unity in the fluid feature, pressure and oil-gas-water interface also increases successively from the Naxi to the Renqiu type. The main body of Ordovician reservoirs of the Tahe Oilfield in the Tarim Basin is a network pool rather than a stratified, massive, stratigraphically-unconformed or weathering-crust one. The fluid nature of oil, gas and water, the interface positions and the pressures, as well as the dynamic conditions of fluids within the reservoirs during the production are all different from those in stratified or massive oil and gas reservoirs. Carbonates in the Akekule uplift and the Tahe Oilfield are assemblages of various types of reservoirs, which have an overall oil-beating potential and obvious uneven distribution. Testing and producing tests are the major means to evaluate this type of reservoirs and acid fracturing improvement is a key link in petroleum exploration and development

Basin fluid flow, base-metal sulphide mineralization and the development of dolomite petroleum reservoirs, 2004, Gregg Jay M. ,
Saline basinal fluids, at temperatures from 60 to 250 {degrees}C, have affected almost every sedimentary basin in the world including rocks from Palaeoproterozoic to Cenozoic age. These fluids commonly precipitate base-metal sulphides (pyrite, sphalerite, galena, etc.) and associated minerals (barite, fluorite, calcite, dolomite, etc.) ranging in volume from trace amounts to large economic ore deposits. Such deposits are commonly referred to as Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) after the large Palaeozoic deposits of this kind found in the Mississippi Valley of North America. They are primarily hosted by platform carbonates, typically dolomite, and are usually associated with hydrocarbons. Dolomites not affected by mineralizing fluids commonly display micron- to decimicron-size planar textures, and have well-developed micro- and mesoporosity networks dominated by intercrystal and vug porosity. However, these and other carbonate rocks affected by basinal fluids may undergo massive geochemical and textural alteration. This occurs even when the affected rocks are distal from the main loci of sulphide mineralization. Alteration includes: dolomitization of limestone; neomorphic recrystallization of existing dolomite; and precipitation at intervals of large volumes of open-space-filling dolomite, calcite and quartz cements alternating with dissolution. Dolomitization of limestone and/or neomorphic recrystallization of dolomite, at elevated temperatures, commonly results in centimicron and larger size crystals, and development of nonplanar textures that increase pore-throat tortuosity. Open-space-filling dolomite, calcite and quartz cementation causes a dramatic reduction of porosity and blockage of pore throats. Periods of carbonate dissolution, proximal to intense sulphide mineralization, result in the development of large-scale macroporosity such as breccias that are commonly superimposed on karst and tectonic fractures. Exposure to mineralizing basinal fluids substantially alters porosity and permeability distribution, and thus the potential reservoir properties of the dolomite. The resulting reservoir may have little resemblance to its precursor. Understanding the epigenetic history of a dolomite is critical, therefore, as this will ultimately affect its development strategy and production history

Paleokarst and reservoir porosity in the Ordovician Beekmantown Dolomite of the central appalachian basin, 2005, Smosna R. , Bruner K. R. , Riley R. A. ,
A karst-unconformity play at the top of the Ordovician Beckmantown Dolomite is judged to have great petroleum potential in Ohio and adjacent states; wells have high ultimate reserves and large areas remain untested. To better understand the origin, development, and distribution of Beckmantown porosity, we conducted a petrologic-stratigraphic study of cores and thin sections from 15 oil and gas wells. The massive dolomite, characterized by a hypidiotopic-idiotopic texture, formed by the replacement of stacked peritidal carbonate cycles. Secondary porosity occurs at two scales: (1) mesoscopic-breccia porosity, solution-enlarged fractures, large vugs, and caverns, and (2) microscopic-intercrystalline, intracrystalline, molds, small vugs, and microfractures. Mesoscopic pores (providing the major storage capacity in this reservoir) were produced by intrastratal solution and collapse of carbonate layers, whereas microscopic pores (connecting the larger pores) generally formed by the leaching of individual carbonate grains and crystals. Most pore types developed during periods of subaerial exposure across the carbonate bank, tied to either the numerous, though brief falls of relative sea level during Beekmantown deposition or more importantly the prolonged Knox unconformity at the close of sedimentation. The distribution of reservoir-quality porosity is quite heterogeneous, being confined vertically to a zone immediately below the unconformity and best developed laterally beneath buried hills and noses of this erosion surface. The inferred, shallow flow of ground water in the Beekmantown karst, primarily below topographic highs and above a diagenetic base level close to the water table, led to this irregular distribution of porosity

Fluid inclusion study of a sedimentary basin: an example of Culberson sulfur and barite deposit, Texas, 2006, Lu H. Z. ,
The Culberson sulfur-barite deposit is located in Culberson county, West Texas. Geologically, it is occurred ill Delaware sedimentary, petroleum and natural gas basin. There are several sulfur-barite deposits occurring in the basin, Culberson is the largest one. Culberson deposit is hosted by Upper Permian Castile and Salado formation. The Castile and Salodo formation consist of limestone with thin layers of evaporate and organic materials. Natural sulfur and barite is formed post diagenesis, filled into the palco karst and replaced the internal layers of anhydrite. Two generation fluid inclusions are found: I. Fluid inclusion formed during the diagenesis, and II. Fluid inclusion trapped during the authigenic calcite, barite overgrowth. According to the phases and composition at room temperature, the fluid inclusions could be divided into: one phase liquid inclusion; two phases vapor and liquid inclusion, and oil inclusion. In a same growth zone of calcite, several types of fluid inclusions, such as one phase liquid, different vapor/liquid ratio inclusions and oil inclusions occurred. These inclusions are hardly to he used to gel the temperature of homogenization, since they are formed in heterogeneous trapping or an immiscibility environment. The eutectic temperatures of fluid inclusions range from -18 to -24 degrees C, indicating life fluid belongs to a NaCl-H2O system, with the salinity ranges from 2% to 10%, and co-existing with the oil inclusions, these show that the ore forming fluid is an oil filed brine and with temperature less than 100 degrees C

Paleokarst in Middle Devonian Winnipegosis mud mounds, subsurface of south-central Saskatchewan, Canada, 2006, Fu Q, Qing H, Bergman Km,

Paleokarst of the Winnipegosis mud mounds is mainly characterized by extensive solution features and cavity deposits. Solution features vary from millimetre-size vugs/channels to metre-scale caverns. Most solution voids are filled with anhydrite and/or carbonate deposits. 'Swiss-cheese' type porosities appear as oval to irregular pore networks and most of them remain open. Erosional surfaces are observed in several cores. Fractures and breccia fragments are small-scale and commonly associated with solution features or calcretes. Cavity sediments are dominantly detrital dolomite, interpreted as a product of weathering of the host rocks. Speleothems occur in vugs and channels but are not abundant. Caverns and large vugs likely formed at or just below the water table in the phreatic zone or in a freshwater-saltwater mixing zone during subaerial exposure of the mounds. Porous 'Swiss-cheese' fabrics resemble sponge-like pores that form in mixing zones of modern carbonate platforms and islands. Porosity in the Winnipegosis mounds was extensively modified by karstification and subsequent anhydrite cementation. Paleokarst occurs only in the middle and upper parts of relatively high Winnipegosis mounds with respect to the basin floor. Multiple levels of caverns and vugs are probably related to various positions of freshwater lenses corresponding to recurrent subaerial exposure and water level changes in the Elk Point Basin. Occurrence of caverns and large vugs at 55 m below the top of the mounds indicates that the mixing zone or freshwater has extended downward to this depth


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