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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That induced infiltration is an increase in infiltration from a surface water body by the lowering of the original water table [16].?

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Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Karst environment, Culver D.C.
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Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
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Your search for fish (Keyword) returned 79 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 16 to 30 of 79
On the Subterranean Syncarids of Tasmania, 1977, Lake P. S. , Coleman D. J.

The current knowledge on the occurrence of syncarid crustaceans in underground habitats in Tasmania is reviewed. The "mountain shrimp" Anaspides tasmaniae has been recorded on at least five occasions from caves. Syncarid shrimps in the genera Allenaspides, Koonunga and Nicraspides have been collected from crayfish burrows. The term Pholeteros is coined to define the community of organisms dwelling in crayfish burrows. Syncarids in the genera Koonunga and Atopobathynella have been collected in the bed of streams (Hyporheos). The collection of the new species of syncarid from an underground spring at Devonport is reported.


Studies of the cave crayfish, Orconectes inermis inermis Cope (Decapoda, Cambaridae). Part IV: Mark-recapture procedures for estimating population size and movements of individuals., 1978, Hobbs Iii Horton H.
Several methods for permanently marking cavernicolous crayfishes were investigated prior to initiation of field work in Pless Cave, Lawrence County, Indiana. Internally injected ink complemented with external "painting" proved to be a most satisfactory tagging procedure. During the two-year study period 211 individuals of the troglobitic crayfish Orconectes inermis inermis Cope were marked; 96 tagged individuals were recaptured at least once, a 46% recapture rate. The population size was estimated to be 1586 +/- 79 (95 % C.L.) over the 540 m subterranean stream study area and remained relatively stable during the period of 1970 to 1972. The home range of male crayfishes is as high as 20 m and extends up to 23 m for females, although maximum distances travelled by individuals of both sexes greatly exceed these values. Small individuals of both sexes are displaced downstream whereas larger crayfish show distinct upstream movement. If all movement data are pooled, both sexes exhibit a net downstream movement. The downstream movement of crayfish is heavily influenced by flooding.

Observations on the behaviour patterns of the Cuban cave fish Lucifuga subterranea Poey (Pisces, Ophidiidae)., 1978, Piquemal M. , Thins Georges
The swimming behaviour and the sensory reactions of the blind Cuban cave fish Lucifuga subterranea Poey were studied on a single individual during a period of 6 months. Mechanical stimulation elicits but slight reactions. Gustatory substances in solution elicit fairly typical motor responses which are not followed by systematic exploration behaviour, the same being true for stimulations by odours of prey. The presence of moving prey provokes an oriented exploration with a slight plunging movement of the kind evidenced in other cave fishes. Actual seizing of the prey requires an active approach of the latter towards the anterior part of the body of the fish.

Locomotor responses of the cave fish Astyanax jordani (Pisces, Characidae) to periodic and aperiodic light and temperature signals., 1978, Thins Georges, Weyers M.
The locomotory activity of adult cave fishes Astyanax jordani was recorded in isolation in the following light and temperature conditions: constant conditions (100 Lx; 200C), in a light cycle (LD:11/11 -10 Lx -100 Lx) and in a temperature cycle (11/11; 17/20, 19/22, 20/23, 27/30 C). All longitudinal time series extended for a minimum of 30 days. Results show: (1) That no circadian regulation appears in constant conditions; (2) that passive entrainment occurs in LD (Amplitude: 90 Lx) and in periodic temperature conditions (Amplitude: 3C). The entrainment effect damps out and varies individually; (3) that the mean activity increases with temperature; (4) The adjustment of activity to periodic signals is individually stable. These results suggest that A. Jordani is devoid of any endogenous oscillator of the circadian type. The observed thermal adaptation could have the following functions: (1) To increase the level of activity in function of the thermal level under the form of passive entrainment; (2) To enhance the exploratory behaviour of the fish in search of a thermal preference allowing the animal to keep inside a well defined zone of the subterranean biotope in relation to small local temperature changes.

The Fish and Wildlife Service Bat Program in Southern New England, 1980, Ladd, Edward R.

Investigations of the Troglobitic Crayfish Orconectes inermis testii (Hay) in Mayfield's Cave, Monroe County, Indiana., 1981, Hobbs Iii Horton H.
Mark-recapture studies of some aspects of the biology of the cavernicolous crayfish, Orconectes inermis testii (Hay), were conducted from December, 1969 to March, 1970, in Mayfield's Cave, Monroe County, Indiana. Population size was estimated to be 66 +/- 9 (95% C.L.) for the 300 m study area, but because of the small sample size, this is undoubtedly a deflated value. Size of animals, expressed as total length, indicates that the population was comprised primarily of adults. Seventy-four percent of the marked crayfish moved no more than 10.5 m away (total upstream and downstream distances) from the tagging site. Hence, this species appears to restrict its activities to a specific area ("home range") of up to 10.5 m of stream passage. Form I males travelled greater distances than did Form II (15.1 and 3.0 m, respectively), possibly in search of mates. Adult females moved less than juveniles, and males appeared to move greater distances than females (means of 12.9 and 5.9 m, respectively). Upstream movements were more commonly observed than downstream (mainly Form I males), indicating a possible restocking mechanism following floods. Distances travelled were not rebated to the size of individuals or to elapsed time.

Effets des informations chimiques provenant d'un milieu habit par des congnres sur I'orientation topographique du poisson cavernicole Phreatichthys andruzzii Vinciguerra (Pisces, Cyprinidae)., 1982, Berti Roberto, Lefvre B. , Thins Georges
Two series of experiments were performed on the oriented locomotor responses of 27 specimens of the blind cave fish Phreatichthys andruzzii from Somalia using a three-compartment choice apparatus. The oriented responses were observed individually from the central compartment towards either of the extreme ones. In one of them, 500 ml water were introduced from either the tank in which the test fish had previously resided with conspecifics (lst series, 46 experiments) or from another tank occupied by unknown conspecifics, the other compartment receiving an equivalent of pure water. The two series were performed in random blocks of 6 experiments, the momentary position of the test fish being noted every 30 seconds after an adaptation period of at least 4 hours. Results, analyzed in 9 blocks of 5 minutes show a definite preferential orientation of the fishes for the compartment containing chemical information from both known or unknown conspecifics. This effect is discussed in relation to the ecological conditions in which the species under study lives.

Observations on the Biology of Cave Planarians of the United States., 1982, Carpenter Jerry H.
Observations are made on the biology of several species of cave planarians (mostly of the family Kenkiidae) collected alive from over 50 caves in 14 states. Most of these species were maintained in laboratory cultures at 12C3C. Food eaten was extremely variable. Functions of the anterior adhesive organ included food capture, locomotion, defence against predators, and probably chemoreception, mechanoreception, and as a holdfast in strong currents. Predators probably consist of fishes, crayfishes, and salamanders. Sporozoan and ciliated parasites were found occasionally. Cocoons were found in winter, spring, and summer; they hatched in about 3 months and contained 2 to 17 young.

Lithification of peritidal carbonates by continental brines at Fisherman Bay, South Australia, to form a megapolygon/spelean limestone association, 1982, Ferguson J, Burne Rv, Chambers La,
Lithification, which commenced less than 3000 yrs BP is still active, and has formed a cavernous limestone containing megapolygons, tepees, and speleothems including pisoliths, floe aragonite, and aragonite pool deposits. The emerging waters evolved from low alkalinity waters of Pleistocene sand and clay coastal plain aquifers which passed through an underlying Tertiare marine carbonate aquifer, have high P CO2 , total carbonate, Ca, and sulfate concentrations. They are close to saturation with respect to aragonite, and their mMg (super 2) /mCa (super 2) ratios approach or exceed the critical aragonite precipitation value. Features which diagnose ancient examples of this process: primary aragonitic cements with high mSr (super 2) /mCa (super 2) values; nonmarine delta 34 S values in gypsum; two superimposed networks of surface polygons, one delineated by extensional boundaries, the other by tepees; high-water vadose-zone isopachous grain cements; interconnected, speleothem-lined cavities; and the presence of evaporites only in surface sediments. Possible ancient examples are recognized in West Texas, Lombardy, and the Atlas Mountains. The areal extent of each of these deposits suggests that the process may be a geologically important feature, and its products may be diagnostic of semi-arid or arid-zone paralic sedimentation.--Modified journal abstract

Evolutionary Reduction by Neutral Mutations: Plausibility Arguments and Data From Amblyopsid Fishes and Linyphiid Spiders, 1985, Poulson, Thomas L.

The anatomy and histology of the alimentary tract of the blind catfish Horaglanis Krishnai Menon, 1985, Mercy T. V. Anna, Pillai N. Krishna
H. krishnai is a blind catfish inhabiting the dug-out wells at Kottavam Kerala, South India. Studies on the alimentary tract of the fish show that, the alimentary tract, though typically teleostean, shows several adaptive modifications. The bulbous stomach helps in storing food which is helpful in an environment chronically deficient in food. The ileo-rectal sphincter helps in retaining the digested food in the intestine for a long duration to facilitate maximum absorption. This is very helpful as the intestine is short. The liver is well developed.

The Invertebrate Faunas of Tropcal American Caves, Part 6: Jumandi Cave, Ecuador, 1985, Peck Stewart B.
Twenty-two species of invertebrates are reported from Jumandi Cave, Napo Province, Ecuador. Three are probably trogloxenes, and the other 19 are troglophiles. The only troglobite is the catfish Astroblepus pholeter.

Food-finding ability in cave fish (Astyanax fasciatus), 1987, Huppop Kathrin
When competing under cave similar conditions, such as darkness and food scarcity, cave fish find much more food than their epigean relatives. The cave fish not only react much faster to food but also their food-finding ability is four times higher compared to that of the epigean fish. Several morphological and ethological alterations in the cave fish, described by other authors, seem to be responsible for this adaptation to the cave conditions.

Wilderness Myths and Australian Caves, 1987, Hamiltonsmith, Elery

Beyond a preliminary discussion of some of the basic issues in the writing of any history, the paper looks at what might be called 'Wilderness Myths' of Australian caves. Any wild place generates myths, and Australian caves have their share of these, which constitute the 'folk history' of caving areas (and often that of cave guides). It is argued that these are more-or-less systematic and are not simply the result of error or simple exaggeration in transmitting the story. Examples include myths about bottomless pits, blind fish, aboriginal-white conflict, bushrangers and popular heroes of cave discoveries (along with the interesting result that non-heroes are neglected or even completely forgotten). Wilderness myths present two issues to the would-be historian : what actual events contributed to them and what does their evolution as myths mean?


Evolutionary genetics and morphometrics of a cave crayfish population from Chiapas (Mexico), 1988, Allegrucci Giuliana, Baldari Fabiola, Cesaroni Donatella, Sbordoni Valerio
The recently explored Cueva de Los Camarones, in the remote village of Constitucion, Chiapas, Mexico, houses a unique highly variable population of Procambarus crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda). Morphologically, a more or less clinal variation is revealed at several features such as the degree of rudimentation in both pigmentation and eye, and the elongation of body and appendages. Extremes are quite different, ranging from typical dark, thick, eyed individuals to light, elongated, microphtalmic phenotypes. Evolutionary relationships among individuals were investigated electrophoretically (25 structural gene loci) and morphometrically (12 characters) by means of multivariate analyses. Results from analysis of individual allozymic multilocus profiles indicate that the "light" phenotypes belong to a distinct gene pool with respect to the "dark" ones, but some level of introgression is hypothesized. Results from analysis of individual morphometric profiles also show a discrimination between light and dark samples, chiefly determined by the shape of the rostrum and chela. The existence of such a discontinuous variation both in morphometric and allozymic characters presumably reflects a history of allopatric divergence followed by secondary contact of the two species.

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