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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 11 Jul, 2012
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That permeability, specific is the permeability measured when the rock contains only one fluid [22].?

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Your search for new zealand (Keyword) returned 35 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 31 to 35 of 35
Great Caves of the World, 2008, Waltham, Tony

A short general introduction, then large photographs and short texts on 28 of the world's great caves, each one selected for some special feature of its geology, geomorhology, biology or history. Sof Omar (Ethiopia); Sterkfontein (South Africa); Castleguard (Canada); Mammoth (Kentucky); Lechuguillaand Carlsbad (New Mexico); Kazumura (Hawaii); Villa Luzand Sac Actun (Mexico); Quashies River (Jamaica); Janelao (Brazil); Pinega (Russia); Krubera (Georgia); Tri Nahacu (Iran); Difeng (China); Akiyoshi (Japan); Hinboun (Laos); Perak Tong and Mulu (Malaysia); Nare (Papua New Guinea); Nullarbor (Australia); Waitomo (New Zealand); Gaping Gill (England); Chauvet and Berger (France); Alpine Ice Caves (Austria); Skocjanske and Krizna (Slovenia).


Flank Margin Cave Development in Telogenetic Limestones of New Zealand, 2008, Mylroie J. E. , Mylroie J. R. , Nelson C. S.

Coastal limestone outcrops, typically with advanced levels of diagenetic maturity (i.e., are telogenetic carbonates), were examined on North Island (Raglan Harbour, Kawhia Harbour, Napier, and Waipu Cove) and South Island (Pohara, Paturau River, Punakaiki, Kakanui, and Kaikoura), New Zealand, to determine if flank margin caves, produced by mixing dissolution, were present. In coastal settings, caves in carbonate rock can be the outcome of pseudokarst process, primarily wave erosion, as well as karst processes not associated with fresh and sea-water mixing such as epikarst features and conduit-flow stream caves. Flank margin caves were successfully differentiated from other cave types by the following criteria: phreatic dissolutional morphologies at the wall rock and chamber scales; absence of high- velocity, turbulent-flow wall sculpture and sediment deposits; and lack of integration of adjacent caves into a continuous flow path. The active tectonics of New Zealand creates a variable sea- level situation. The relatively short time of sea-level stability limits the size of the New Zealand flank margin caves compared to tectonically-stable environments, such as the Bahamas, where glacioeustasy alone controls sea-level stability. Uplift events can be identified as slow and steady when the flank margin caves are uniformly elongated in the vertical direction, and episodic when the flank margin caves show widening and tube development at discrete horizons that cut across rock structure. New Zealand flank margin caves contain information on uplift duration and rates independent of other commonly used measures, and therefore can provide a calibration to other methods.


FLANK MARGIN CAVE DEVELOPMENT IN CARBONATE TALUS BRECCIA FACIES: AN EXAMPLE FROM CRES ISLAND, CROATIA, 2010, Otoni?ar Bojan, Buzjak Nenad, Mylroie John & Mylroie Joan
Plava Grota, Cres Island, Croatia, is a flank margin cave developed in a coastal setting in talus breccia facies. The internal cave geometry of small entrances, intersecting adjacent chambers, remnant dissolutional bedrock pillars, and low arches matches diagnostic features used to separate flank margin caves from epigenic stream caves on one hand, and sea caves on the other. Plava Grota is found, along with adjacent smaller caves, solely in a breccia facies that is most probably of Pleistocene age. This breccia is comprised of clasts derived from diagenetically mature, or telogenetic, Cretaceous carbonate rocks. The clasts are loosely cemented by vadose calcite cements. The breccia facies provide a three-dimensional porosity and permeability structure that behaves hydraulically in a manner similar to the high primary porosity and permeability of young eogenetic carbonate rocks in settings such as the Bahamas or Puerto Rico, and the many flow paths found in highly-tectonized telogenetic carbonate rocks in New Zealand. Plava Grota is the first described flank margin cave from the coastal carbonate rocks of the Adriatic Sea. According to present sea-level position in relation to the cave, fresh-water springs in and adjacent to the cave, general tectonic subsidence of the area and Quaternary eustatic sea-level fluctuations, we propose the hypotheses that the cave was primarily formed during the MIS 5e sea-level highstand.

Age frequency distribution and revised stable isotope curves for New Zealand speleothems: palaeoclimatic implications., 2010, Williams P. W. , Neil H. And Zhao Jx.
The occurrence of speleothems in New Zealand with reversed magnetism indicates that secondary calcite deposition in caves has occurred for more than 780 thousand years (ka). 394 uranium-series dates on 148 speleothems show that such deposition has taken place somewhere in the country with little interruption for more than 500 ka. A relative probability distribution of speleothem ages indicates that most growth occurred in mild, moist interglacial and interstadial intervals, a conclusion reinforced by comparing peaks and troughs in the distribution with time series curves of speleothem ?18O and ?13C values. The stable isotope time series were constructed using data from 15 speleothems from two different regions of the country. The greater the number of overlapping speleothem series (i.e. the greater the sample depth) for any one region, the more confidence is justified in considering the stacked record to be representative of the region. Revising and extending earlier work, composite records are produced for central-west North Island (CWNI) and north-west South Island (NWSI). Both demonstrate that over the last 15 ka the regions responded similarly to global climatic events, but that the North Island site was also influenced by the waxing and waning of regional subtropical marine influences that penetrated from the north but did not reach the higher latitudes of the South Island. Cooling marking the commencement of the last glacial maximum (LGM) was evident from about 28 ka. There was a mid-LGM interstadial at 23-21.7 ka and Termination 1 occurred around 18.1 ka. The glacial-interglacial transition was marked by a series of negative excursions in ?18O that coincide with dated recessional moraines in South Island glaciers. A late glacial cooling event, the NZ Late Glacial Reversal, occurred from 13.4-11.2 ka and this was followed by an early Holocene optimum at 10.8 ka. Comparison of ?18O records from NWSI and EPICA DML ice-core shows climatic events in New Zealand to lag those in Antarctica by several centuries to a thousand years. Waxing and waning of subantarctic and subtropical oceanic influences in the Tasman Sea are considered the immediate drivers of palaeoclimatic change.

Age frequency distribution and revised stable isotope curves for New Zealand speleothems: palaeoclimatic implication, 2010, Williams P. W. , Neil H. , Zhao Jx.

The occurrence of speleothems in New Zealand with reversed magnetism indicates that secondary calcite deposition in caves has occurred for more than 780 thousand years (ka). 394 uranium-series dates on 148 speleothems show that such deposition has taken place somewhere in the country with little interruption for more than 500 ka. A relative probability distribution of speleothem ages indicates that most growth occurred in mild, moist interglacial and interstadial intervals, a conclusion reinforced by comparing peaks and troughs in the distribution with time series curves of speleothem δ18O and δ13C values. The stable isotope time series were constructed using data from 15 speleothems from two different regions of the country. The greater the number of overlapping speleothem series (i.e. the greater the sample depth) for any one region, the more confidence is justified in considering the stacked record to be representative of the region. Revising and extending earlier work, composite records are produced for central-west North Island (CWNI) and north-west South Island (NWSI). Both demonstrate that over the last 15 ka the regions responded similarly to global climatic events, but that the North Island site was also influenced by the waxing and waning of regional subtropical marine influences that penetrated from the north but did not reach the higher latitudes of the South Island. Cooling marking the commencement of the last glacial maximum (LGM) was evident from about 28 ka. There was a mid-LGM interstadial at 23-21.7 ka and Termination 1 occurred around 18.1 ka. The glacial-interglacial transition was marked by a series of negative excursions in δ18O that coincide with dated recessional moraines in South Island glaciers. A late glacial cooling event, the NZ Late Glacial Reversal, occurred from 13.4-11.2 ka and this was followed by an early Holocene optimum at 10.8 ka. Comparison of δ18O records from NWSI and EPICA DML ice-core shows climatic events in New Zealand to lag those in Antarctica by several centuries to a thousand years. Waxing and waning of subantarctic and subtropical oceanic influences in the Tasman Sea are considered the immediate drivers of palaeoclimatic change.


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