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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology


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Community news

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That type curve is a plot of the theoretical well function verses the lower limit of the integral in theis' graphical solution method [16]. numerous variations of theis' original work have been developed for which type curves readily exist.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms


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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for faunas (Keyword) returned 38 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 31 to 38 of 38
Understanding the Tempo and Mode of Evolution: Cave Adaptation as a Model System, 2008,
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Porter M. , Dittmar K. , Hutchins B. , Jeffery W. , Lefbure T. , Paquin P. , Protas M.

SMALL TERRESTRIAL MAMMALS (SORICOMORPHA, CHIROPTERA, RODENTIA) FROM THE EARLY HOLOCENE LAYERS OF MALA TRIGLAVCA (SW SLOVENIA), 2009,
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Tokan Borut
At least 132 specimens belonging to no less than 21 species of small terrestrial mammals from the Boreal were identi- fied within the finds from the Early Holocene sediments from Mala Triglavca (the Kras Plateau, SW Slovenia), namely Crocidura suaveolens, Sorex alpinus / araneus, S. minutus, Talpa cf. europaea, Barbastella barbastellus, Sciurus vulgaris, Cricetulus migratorius, Arvicola terrestris, Microtus agrestis / arvalis, M. subterraneus / liectensteini, Chionomys nivalis, Myodes glareolus, Dinaromys bogdanovi, Glis glis, Muscardinus avellanarius and Apodemus flaavicollis / sylvaticus / agrarius / uralensis. This small mammal assemblage indicates that their habitat was presumably a mosaic of a mixed, predominantly deciduous forest, dotted with small meadows and some rocky substrate. A comparison of allochronous microfaunas from the Kras Plateau indicated a rapid faunistic change in the last 5,000 years.

Quaternary cave faunas of Canada: a review of the vertebrate remains, 2011,
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Harington, C. R.

Highlights of ice-age vertebrate faunas from Canadian caves are presented in geographic order (east to west). They include four each from Quebec and Ontario; three from Alberta; one from Yukon; and ten from British Columbia. Localities, vertebrate species represented, radiocarbon ages, and paleoenvironmental evidence are mentioned where available, as well as pertinent references. Of these caves, perhaps Bluefish Caves, Yukon, are most significant, because they contain evidence for the earliest people in North America. Tables provide lists of species and radiocarbon ages from each site


Duality of terrestrial subterranean fauna, 2012,
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Novak T. Perc M. Lipovek S. Janekovič, F.

Terrestrial animals in subterranean habitats are often classified according to their degree of morphological or ecological specialization to the subterranean environment. The commonly held view is that, as distance into a cave increases, the frequency of morphologically specialized, i.e., troglomorphic, species or ecological specialization will increase. We tested this hypothesis for the fauna in 54 caves in Slovenia–the classical land for subterranean biology. We found that there exist two ecologically well separated terrestrial subsurface faunas: one shallow and one deep. 1) The shallow subterranean fauna, adapted to the terrestrial shallow subterranean habitats (SSHs) in the upper 10 m of subsurface strata, is most diverse. It consists of randomly distributed non-troglobionts and a major group of troglobionts adapted to the soil root zone. 2) The deep subterranean fauna is represented by a minor group of troglobionts, adapted to caves. Troglobionts are strictly divided between the two faunas. There is strong evidence that in karstic ecosystems with deep-rooted vegetation this might be a global pattern, or that in these locations only the shallow subterranean fauna exist.


Duality of terrestrial subterranean fauna, 2012,
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Novak Tone, Matja Perc, Saka Lipovek, Franc Janekovič,

Terrestrial animals in subterranean habitats are often classified according to their degree of morphological or ecological specialization to the subterranean environment. The commonly held view is that, as distance into a cave increases, the frequency of morphologically specialized, i.e., troglomorphic, species or ecological specialization will increase. We tested this hypothesis for the fauna in 54 caves in Slovenia–the classical land for subterranean biology. We found that there exist two ecologically well separated terrestrial subsurface faunas: one shallow and one deep. 1) The shallow subterranean fauna, adapted to the terrestrial shallow subterranean habitats (SSHs) in the upper 10 m of subsurface strata, is most diverse. It consists of randomly distributed non-troglobionts and a major group of troglobionts adapted to the soil root zone. 2) The deep subterranean fauna is represented by a minor group of troglobionts, adapted to caves. Troglobionts are strictly divided between the two faunas. There is strong evidence that in karstic ecosystems with deep-rooted vegetation this might be a global pattern, or that in these locations only the shallow subterranean fauna exist.


Emine-Bair-Khosar Cave in the Crimea, a huge bone accumulation of Late Pleistocene fauna, 2013,
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Ridush . , Stefaniak K. , Socha P. , Proskurnyak Y. , Marciszak A. , Vremir M. , Nadachowski A.

The Crimean Mountains are well known from the abundance of Middle and Late Palaeolithic sites and palaeontological remains recovered from cultural layers in caves and rockshelters. The fossil-bearing deposits of Emine-Bair-Khosar Cave, located at the elevation of 1000 m on the Chatyrdag Plateau, yielded a very diverse and numerous vertebrate remains that widen the knowledge of Late Pleistocene faunal diversity in the Crimea. The assemblage comprised in total almost 50 species of vertebrates. Studies included geomorphological, geological and stratigraphic analyses as well AMS 14C dating. Faunal remains were present in ten palaeontological sites. The main bone accumulation (section Ba2) was deposited during Middle Valdai or Vytachiv (MIS 3) interstadial, and including a long time gap, to the end of the Pleistocene and the Holocene. Comparison of the Emine-Bair-Khosar fauna with vertebrate faunas of other Crimean sites showed a remarkable stability in the faunal composition and frequency during the whole MIS 3 interstadial. Steppe and other open-country species dominated in the compared assemblages, while boreal-tundra species were far less numerous. Inhabitants of forests, including red deer and some rodents, were stable members of fossil assemblages.


A world review of fungi, yeasts, and slime molds in caves, 2013,
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Vanderwolf K. , Malloch D. , Mcalpine D. F. , Forbes G. J.

We provide a review of fungi, yeasts, and slime molds that have been found in natural solution caves and mines worldwide. Such habitats provide frequent roost sites for bats, and in eastern North America the environmental conditions that support white-nose syndrome, a lethal fungal disease currently devastating bat populations. A list of 1029 species of fungi, slime moulds, and yeasts in 518 genera have been documented from caves and mines worldwide in 225 articles. Ascomycota dominate the cave environment. Most research has been conducted in temperate climates, especially in Europe. A mean of 17.9±24.4SD fungal species are reported per study. Questions remain about the origin and ecological roles of fungi in caves, and which, if any, are cave-specialists. In the northern hemisphere, caves are generally characterized by relatively stable, low temperatures and a lack of organic substrates. This environment favors communities of oligotrophic, psychrotolerant fungi. Data that may help explain how cave environmental features and faunas inf luence the introduction and transmission of cave fungi remains scant.


Paving the Way for Standardized and Comparable Subterranean Biodiversity Studies, 2013,
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David C Culver, Peter Trontelj, Maja Zagmajster, Tanja Pipan

A series of potential pitfalls (fallacies) in estimating subterranean biodiversity are outlined: (1) provincialism—treating different regions differently, especially with respect to new discoveries and undescribed species; (2) equality of described and undescribed species—ignoring the possibility that undescribed species are not really new species; (3) isotropy—assuming all cave regions of similar size have equally rich faunas; (4) scale invariance—ignoring the affect of area on species richness; and (5) misuse of expert opinion—the over-reliance on experts estimates often without comparable estimates for all areas. Some standard procedures are suggested for subterranean biodiversity studies, and the value of such studies is emphasized.


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