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The book "Hypogene Karst Regions and Caves of the World" is finished
The book “Hypogene Karst Regions and Caves of the World” is going to be published by Springer, in its series “Cave and Karst Systems of the World”.
Karst session at the AGU Fall 2016 Meeting in San Francisco
There will be a karst session at the AGU Fall 2016 Meeting in San Francisco, USA in December 12-16: Characterization, Modeling, and Remediation of Fissured, Carbonate, and Karst Groundwater Systems
A new book on caves and karst in Austria
A book "Höhlen und Karst in Österreich" (Caves and karst in Austria; Editors: Christoph Spötl, Lukas Plan & Ehrad Christian) will be printed until mid of July. Subscription is available.
Unusual perspective on caves
Many inspiring ideas on caves can be found in images created by children, generated by the International Contest of Kid’s Drawing "Caves in the Eyes of our Children".
Session on Karst Aquifers at the 43th IAH Congress, France
A call to submit an abstract to a session devoted to karst aquifers, which will be held in September in Montpellier during the 43rd IAH Congress

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Did you know?

That blue hole is 1. deep resurgence pool, notably in jamaica and florida, that may have a blue color due to the presence of algae. also a deep submarine cave of the bahamas. the latter type are large flooded shafts cut into the limestones of the shallow reefs and lagoon floors. many are 100 m in diameter and some are 100 m deep. opening from the shafts are flooded cave passages at various depths, some of which have been explored subhorizontally for more than 1 km. their origins are complex. extensive stalagmite deposits show that large old caves were drained when sea-levels were low during the pleistocene (when water was held in the ice sheets). they are now being modified by marine dissolution, notably at the interface between fresh and salt waters (sea littoral zone) and by powerful tidal flows between connected holes [9]. 2. (jamaican.) a major emergence where water (artesian spring) rises from below without great turbulence. 3. (bahamas.) a drowned solution sinkhole [10]. 4. caribbean expression for a major quiet up-welling karst spring inland or along the coast. the blue color is due to the scattering of sunlight by water molecules, although in some cases it may be attributed to the presence of calcareous algae [20]. synonyms: (french.) source bleue (jura), bleu-fon (south of france); (german.) blaue grotto; (greek.) galapo speleo. see also boiling spring.?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

Featured article from karst/cave journal

SAZU, Ljubljana
Acta carsologica, 2010, Vol 39, Issue 2, p. 173-186
Fold and fault control on the drainage pattern of a double-karst-aquifer system, Winterstaude, Austrian Alps
Abstract:

Lithostratigraphy and geologic structures are major controls on groundwater flow in alpine karst systems. Understanding these factors is important for the delimitation of drinking water protection zones. The Winterstaude mountain chain, western Austria, belongs to the Helvetic nappes and consists of Cretaceous sedimentary rocks, including two karstifiable formations: rfla and Schrattenkalk Limestone (lower and upper karst aquifer), separated by 60 m of marl. Strata are folded and cut by faults with displacements of 40–70 m. Folded carbonate rocks continue below the alluvial valley floor so that the karst system can be subdivided in shallow and deep phreatic zones. This area is suitable for studying the combined influence of folds and faults on groundwater flow in a double-aquifer system. A multi-tracer test with seven injections aimed at characterising hydraulic connections and linear flow velocities. Results show that (i) plunging synclines form the main drainage pathways in the upper karst aquifer, with maximum linear velocities of 91 m/h, while anticlines act as water divides; (ii) recharge into the lower aquifer, which forms the central ridge of the mountain chain, contributes to springs discharging from the upper aquifer near the foot of the mountain (local flow systems); (iii) the two aquifers are hydraulically connected, presumably via faults, because their displacements are in the same order of magnitude as the thickness of the intervening marl; (iv) flow in the upper aquifer continues below the valley floor toward the river, with maximum velocities of 22 m/h (intermediate flow system).