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The book "Hypogene Karst Regions and Caves of the World" is finished
The book “Hypogene Karst Regions and Caves of the World” is going to be published by Springer, in its series “Cave and Karst Systems of the World”.
Karst session at the AGU Fall 2016 Meeting in San Francisco
There will be a karst session at the AGU Fall 2016 Meeting in San Francisco, USA in December 12-16: Characterization, Modeling, and Remediation of Fissured, Carbonate, and Karst Groundwater Systems
A new book on caves and karst in Austria
A book "Höhlen und Karst in Österreich" (Caves and karst in Austria; Editors: Christoph Spötl, Lukas Plan & Ehrad Christian) will be printed until mid of July. Subscription is available.
Unusual perspective on caves
Many inspiring ideas on caves can be found in images created by children, generated by the International Contest of Kid’s Drawing "Caves in the Eyes of our Children".
Session on Karst Aquifers at the 43th IAH Congress, France
A call to submit an abstract to a session devoted to karst aquifers, which will be held in September in Montpellier during the 43rd IAH Congress

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Did you know?

That ground water, unconfined is water in an aquifer that has a water table. synonymous with phreatic ground water [22].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

Featured article from geoscience journal

Geomorphology, 2009, Issue 110, p. 203-211
Phreatic drainage conduits within quartz sandstone: Evidence from the Jurassic Precipice Sandstone, Carnarvon Range, Queensland, Australia
Abstract:

Discrete underground drainage conduits in quartz sandstones are far less common than in limestones. This paper provides field evidence from the quartzose Precipice Sandstone in the Carnarvon Range of south-central Queensland, Australia, for tubular underground drainage networks similar in many ways to limestone conduits. Diameters range from less than 1 or 2 cm to over 1.5 m, most display a near-circular to oval cross-section that seems to suggest phreatic or epiphreatic development, and the internal surfaces of many are case-hardened by secondary silica deposits. A number of the region's perennial springs appear to be fed by such tubes. The dominant vertical jointing of the quartz sandstone and relatively high permeability of the sandstone are important controls on tube formation. Solutional weathering of the sandstone is widespread, and is followed by the removal of loosened sand grains by flowing underground water, the process of ‘arenisation’. Tube development would appear to have been happening for a very long time, and may still be occurring. A model for tube network formation is proposed. These findings highlight our potentially poor understanding of groundwater flow within some quartz sandstones, and may have important groundwater management implications.