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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Latest news:

The book "Hypogene Karst Regions and Caves of the World" is finished
The book “Hypogene Karst Regions and Caves of the World” is going to be published by Springer, in its series “Cave and Karst Systems of the World”.
Karst session at the AGU Fall 2016 Meeting in San Francisco
There will be a karst session at the AGU Fall 2016 Meeting in San Francisco, USA in December 12-16: Characterization, Modeling, and Remediation of Fissured, Carbonate, and Karst Groundwater Systems
A new book on caves and karst in Austria
A book "Höhlen und Karst in Österreich" (Caves and karst in Austria; Editors: Christoph Spötl, Lukas Plan & Ehrad Christian) will be printed until mid of July. Subscription is available.
Unusual perspective on caves
Many inspiring ideas on caves can be found in images created by children, generated by the International Contest of Kid’s Drawing "Caves in the Eyes of our Children".
Session on Karst Aquifers at the 43th IAH Congress, France
A call to submit an abstract to a session devoted to karst aquifers, which will be held in September in Montpellier during the 43rd IAH Congress

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Did you know?

That injection head is a swivel head connector through which drilling fluid is injected into the drill pipe [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms

Featured article from geoscience journal

AGU
A dimensionless number describing the effects of recharge and geometry on discharge from simple karstic aquifers
Abstract:

The responses of karstic aquifers to storms are often used to obtain information about aquifer geometry. In general, spring hydrographs are a function of both system geometry and recharge. However, the majority of prior work on storm pulses through karst has not studied the effect of recharge on spring hydrographs. To examine the relative importance of geometry and recharge, we break karstic aquifers into elements according to the manner of their response to transient flow and demonstrate that each element has a characteristic response timescale. These fundamental elements are full pipes, open channels, reservoir/constrictions, and the porous matrix. Taking the ratio of the element timescale with the recharge timescale produces a dimensionless number, γ, that is used to characterize aquifer response to a storm event. Using sets of simulations run with randomly selected element parameters, we demonstrate that each element type has a critical value of γ below which the shape of the spring hydrograph is dominated by the shape of the recharge hydrograph and above which the spring hydrograph is significantly modified by the system geometry. This allows separation of particular element/storm pairs into recharge-dominated and geometry-dominated regimes. While most real karstic aquifers are complex combinations of these elements, we draw examples from several karst systems that can be represented by single elements. These examples demonstrate that for real karstic aquifers full pipe and open channel elements are generally in the recharge-dominated regime, whereas reservoir/constriction elements can fall in either the recharge- or geometry-dominated regimes.