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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

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That artesian aquifer is synonymous with confined aquifer. see aquifer, artesian.?

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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for palaeolithic (Keyword) returned 28 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 1 to 15 of 28
Amber from a Late Palaeolithic Cave Deposit at Gough's Cave, Somerset, 1952, Tratman E. K.

Parietal Art in Koonalda Cave, Nullarbor Plain, South Australia, 1968, Gallus, Alexander

This paper gives a first description of the engravings discovered on the walls of Koonalda Cave(N4), Nullarbor Plain, South Australia. It gives a typologic assessment with reference to known parietal art in the caves of Europe, and to cave engravings discovered in the Katherine area of the Northern Territory, Australia. It establishes the possibility of great antiquity and deals briefly with interpretation. This announcement lays no claim to conclusiveness in the argumentation offered as the facts relating to Australian Palaeolithic Man and his environment are as yet insufficiently known.


Palaeolithic Cave Art and the natural lighting of caves, 1978, Hooper Alex

Methods for Dating Palaeolithic Cave Art, 1979, Hooper Alex

Late Pleistocene cave deposits in Poland, 1982, Madeyska, Teresa

Prhistoire et karst littoral : la grotte Cosquer et les calanques mar_seillaises (Bouches-du-Rhne, France), 1996, Collinagirard, J.
The Cosquer Cave is a French palaeolithic painted and engraved cave (27000/ 18500 BP) which is located under the sea, in the urgonian limestones of Cap Morgiou ("Massif des Calanques"; Marseille). The en trance was submerged at the end of the last glacial stage and is presently 37 m under sea level. A synthesis about the Cosquer cave environmental studies is presented here. Structural studies show that cave planimetry is determined by Cap Morgiou fracturations (mainly NW/SE and N/S vertical faults). Through archaeological studies, a concretion breaking period can be dated between 27000 and 18000 BP. Geomorphological study of the continental shelf at the foot of the Cosquer cave area shows fossils shorelines at -36 m, -50/55 m, -90 m, -100 m depth. Radiocarbon datings from shells collected in 100m sediments yielded a date of 13 250 BP. Direct scuba diving observations and submarine clive profiles sketching show several eustatic stand-still levels between -36 m and the sea surface indicating a probable tectonic stability during the last 10000 years.

Eustatic sea-level and climate changes over the last 600 ka as derived from mollusc-based ESR-chronostratigraphy and pollen evidence in Northern Eurasia, 2002, Molodkov Anatoly N. , Bolikhovskaya Nataliya S. ,
We reconstruct and correlate palaeoclimatic events and deposits from shelf, glacial, periglacial, and extraglacial zones of northern Eurasia over the last 600,000 years. The chronostratigraphical correlation of identified palaeoenvironmental and sea-level events and corresponding horizons is based on electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis of subfossil mollusc skeletal remains from marine, freshwater and Acheulian-bearing cave-site deposits. Over 230 shell samples from more than 40 sites along the continental margin of Eurasian north, in the Black and Caspian sea basins and terrestrial shells from a Lower Palaeolithic cave-site in the Northern Caucasus were dated via ESR to produce a late Quaternary geochronology. The Pleistocene composite section of the loess-palaeosoil formation includes two reference sections--Likhvin and Arapovichi--from the centre of the East-European plain. The palyno-chronostratigraphic record is interpreted as the product of six warm-climate/high sea-level events including the current interglacial, and six glacial events. They are presented either as complete climatic rhythms of glacial and interglacial rank, or by considerable portions of climatic-phytocoenotic phases constituents of the rhythm. The full-interglacial conditions are centred at about 580, 400, 310, 220 and between 145-70 calendar ka. A broad correspondence between long palynological sequence, directly ESR-dated warm-climate-related events and other palaeoenvironmental records described in the literature has been noted for 11 upper oxygen isotope stages (11 to 1). The results obtained in this study exemplify the potential of integrated chrono-climatostratigraphic sequences in linking marine and terrestrial palaeoclimate records that may eventually span the whole Brunhes chron

Uranium series dates from Qesem Cave, Israel, and the end of the Lower Palaeolithic, 2003, Barkai, R. , Gopher, A. , Lauritzen, S. E. , And Frumkin, A.
Israel is part of a geographical ?out of Africa? corridor for human dispersals. An important event in these dispersals was the possible arrival of anatomically modern humans in the Levant during the late Middle Pleistocene1,2,3. In the Levant the Lower Paleolithic ends with the Acheulo-Yabrudian complex, characterized by striking technological developments4,5 including the introduction of advanced technological innovations such as systematic blade production and the disappearance of hand-axes . These reflect new human perceptions and capabilities in lithic technology and tool function, as well as innovative human adaptation6. Qesem Cave, discovered in 2000, has a rich, well-preserved Acheulo-Yabrudian sequence holding great promise for providing new insights into the period. Here we report the dates of this cave obtained by U-series of speleothems and their implications. The results shed light on the temporal range of the Acheulo-Yabrudian and the end of the Lower Paleolithic, suggesting a long and unique cultural phase between the Lower Paleolithic Acheulian and the Middle Paleolithic Mousterian, starting well before 350 kyr and ending at ca. 200 kyr.

Ages et modalits des incursions humaines et animales prhistoriques dans ltage Cathala de la grotte dAldne (Hrault, France). Apport des analyses sdimentologiques et gochronologiques, 2004, Guendon Jeanlouis, Ambert Paul, Quinif Yves, Baumes Bernard, Colomer Albert, Dainat Denis, Galant Philippe, Gruneisen Alain, Gruneisen Nathalie
Chronologies and means of prehistoric human and animal frequentations into Aldne cave, Cathala level (Hrault, France). Sedimentology and geochronology studies - The Aldne cave forms a long network of galleries on four levels. Only the first two of these contain prehistoric vestiges. Superior level (Bousquet storey) presents a Lower Palaeolithic stratigraphy in the porch. It contained also, in the deep areas, a thick filling of clays and speleothems with bear bones, intensively quarried during the 19th and 20th centuries for phosphate ore. These workings allowed to discover the second level (Cathala storey) and, in these news galleries, human footprints trail with sooty marks on the walls, numerous animal paw prints, hyena coprolites, scratches and nests made by bears. After study establishing mesolithic age of human footprints (8 200 130 BP, 7 790 60 BP) and anteriority of animal passages, researches were directed on sedimentological and geochronological study (U/Th dating of speleothem). First, the age of the last animal presence in the second level of Aldne was precised, between 41 500 BP to 25 000 BP. Second, means and chronologies of closing of the prehistoric entrance of Cathala storey were revealed. The actual access in these galleries is only an artificial entrance opened up for phosphate mining. It begins by a cat-flap and shafts about twenty meters high. The access used by prehistoric humans and animals is completely obstructed by a very important boulder choke with speleothems interstratified, situated in North part of Cathala gallery. The studies of this boulder choke showed three principal phases of closing of this primitive access: a first collapse of the roof during Middle Pleistocene; an important bedded rock-fragments produced by frost shattering of primitive entrance porch, which filled principal gallery during periglacial stages of the Upper Pleistocene; and a second roof collapse, during Holocene. The burnt pieces of brand left on the ground allowed to recognise the last narrow passage taken by the Mesolithic humans before this last collapse finally obstructing this entrance.

Prehistory and coastal karst area: Cosquer Cave and the Calanques of Marseille, 2004, Collinagirard, J.

The Cosquer Cave is a French Palaeolithic painted and engraved cave (27.000-18.500 BP), which is located under the sea, in the Urgonian limestones of Cap Morgiou (“Massif des Calanques”, Marseille). The entrance was submerged at the end of the Last Glacial Stage and is presently 37 m under sea level. A synthesis about the Cosquer Cave environmental studies is presented here. Structural studies show that caves planimetry is determined by Cap Morgiou jointing (mainly NW-SE and N-S vertical faults). Through archaeological studies, a speleothem breaking period can be dated between 27.000 and 18.000 BP. Geomorphologic study of the continental shelf at the foot of the Cosquer Cave area shows fossil shorelines at -36 m, -50/55 m, -90 m, -100 m depth. Radiocarbon dating from shells collected in -100m sediments yielded a date of 13.250 BP. Direct scuba diving observations and submarine cliff profiles sketching show several eustatic still stand¬ levels between -36m and the current sea surface indicating a probable tectonic stability during the last 10.000 years.


Palaeolithic painting matter: natural or heat-treated pigment?, 2004, Chalmin E, Vignaud C, Menu M,
Analyses of archaeological materials attempt to rediscover the know-how of Prehistoric men by determining the nature of the matter, its preparation mode, and its geographic origin. The preparation mode of painting matter of Palaeolithic rock art consisted not only in mixing and grinding but also in heat-treatment. Palaeolithic painters used two main colors: red (iron oxide, hematite) and black (charcoal or manganese oxide). The different phases of manganese oxides can be distinguished using their elemental composition, their structure and the oxidation state of the Mn ion (II, III, IV). Their transformation during heat-treatment has been studied on mineralogical reference samples by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) either coupled or not with a heating stage (in situ). These studies have enabled us to understand the transformation mechanisms of manganese oxides and also to gain insights into the preparation procedures of painting materials during the Palaeolithic period. The painting samples studied in this paper come from the cave of Lascaux (Dordogne, France). These studies allow us to distinguish between natural or heat-treated manganese oxides

A mineralogical and phytolith study of the middle stone age hearths in Sibudu Cave, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, 2004, Schiegl S. , Stockhammer P. , Scott C. , Wadley L. ,
Sediments from Middle Stone Age hearths and burnt deposits in Sibudu Cave (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa) were analysed for their mineral and phytolith contents. The mineral compositions were determined by FT-IR spectroscopy. The phytoliths were classified and counted by transmitted polarized light microscopy. Burning experiments using wood and grasses from species native to the cave's environment yielded the reference ashes. The visible hearths and ash dumps contain phytolith assemblages characteristic of wood fuel. A significant portion of the phytoliths of hearths and ash layers display morphologies related to intense heating. This finding is suggestive of long-burning wood fires and/or reuse of the same fireplace. The heat-altered phytoliths are useful in tracing fires, especially if hearth structures are not preserved and ash deposits have been diagenetically and heavily altered. The phytolith contents and mineralogical composition of the ash deposits and the surrounding sedimentary matrix are very similar. This feature suggests that the sedimentary matrix originally contained fireplaces and ash deposits, whose structures were destroyed shortly after deposition, presumably by trampling.(21) The intact circular hearths are most likely the product of intense fires. Similar results from hearths and their surrounding matrix have been reported from Middle Palaeolithic cave sites in Israel

Attribution des gravures paleolithiques de la grotte d'Aldene (Cesseras, Herault) a l'Aurignacien par la datation des remplissages geologiques, 2005, Ambert P, Guendon Jl, Galant P, Quinif Y, Gruneisen A, Colomer A, Dainat D, Beaumes B, Requirand C,
ResumeLes gravures paleolithiques de la grotte d'Aldene ont ete decouvertes [13] dans une galerie revelee par l'exploitation miniere des phosphates de ce karst [10]. Reduites a une dizaine d'unites, ces gravures ont pourtant suscite plusieurs etudes [13,15,21]. La derniere [19] souligne leurs ressemblances (faunique et stylistique) avec le bestiaire de la grotte Chauvet [5-7]. L'etude stratigraphique, paleontologique et chronologique des remplissages permet de situer le passage des paleolithiques entre le depot de deux planchers stalagmitiques dates de 37 000 et 24 400 BP. La datation de 30 260 [plus-or-minus sign] 220 BP obtenue sur les charbons issus d'un niveau intermediaire atteste une incursion humaine a l'Aurignacien, synchrone de la premiere phase de l'art de Chauvet. Pour citer cet article : P. Ambert et al., C. R. Palevol 4 (2005).AbstractAttribution of the Palaeolithic engravings of the cave of Aldene (Cesseras, Herault) to the Aurignacian by the dating of geological deposits. The Palaeolithic engravings of the cave of Aldene were discovered [13] in a gallery revealed during the mining of phosphates in this karst [10]. Although only made up of about ten units, these engravings have given rise to several studies [13,15,21]. The most recent [19] highlights their similarities (faunal and stylistic) with the bestiary from the Chauvet cave [5-7]. The stratigraphic, palaeontological and chronological study of the cave deposits permits the dating of the presence of the Palaeolithic people between the deposition of two dripstone floors dated at 37 000 and 24 400 BP. The date of 30 260 [plus-or-minus sign] 220 BP obtained on charcoal sampled from an intermediate level attests a human incursion in the Aurignacian period, which is contemporary with the first phase of the art of Chauvet. To cite this article: P. Ambert et al., C.R. Palevol 4 (2005)

Morphologie et remplissage des dolines du Causse de Martel daprs les observations ralises au cours du diagnostic archologique de larodrome de Brive-Souillac (Corrze et Lot), 2006, Bruxelles Laurent, Colonge David, Salgues Thierry
Doline morphology and filling in the Causse of Martel based on the observations realized during the archaeological diagnosis of the Brive-Souillac airfield (Corrze and Lot, France) - An operation of archaeological diagnosis was led by the INRAP (national institute for preventive archaeological researches) on the Causse de Martel. On this occasion, 610 trenches with bulldozers were done, mainly localized in the bottom of dolines. The morphology of the depressions presents most often a pronounced asymmetry. We observe a gently dipping slope underlain by sandy alterites. On the opposite side, a steep corrosion rim developed in bathonian limestones. The sections show an accumulation of several meters of different sediments. At the base, we find periglacial deposits (stratified scree and yellow silt) which fossilized some archaeological remains of the middle Paleolithic. Just above an erosional unconformity, brown clays with calcareous gravel are found. Thanks to the presence of archaeological material, we date the emplacement of this level to be between the Protohistory and the medieval age. Finally, one or two meters of modern agricultural colluviums end the sequence. These observations put in evidence at least two main periods of infilling of these dolines. They correspond to two major phases of hillside imbalance. The first one has a climatic origin (Periglacial) and the second a human origin (clearings and agriculture). These accumulations are separated from the underlying deposits by distinct erosion surfaces, which can be linked to a reactivation of the karstic undercapture and the erosion of a part of the filling. This functioning corresponds to periods during which the colluviums are less abundant, indicating a certain stability of hillsides. Finally, the morphology of the rock layers and the geometry of the deposits show that the karstic landscape, which was clearly more accentuated before the Periglacial and even before Protohistory, underwent an important filling. Today, the dolines are partially filled and show with a flat bottom.

A review of biostratigraphical investigations of palaeolithic localities in the Southern Urals region, 2006, Danukalova G, Yakovlev A,
At present there are more than 15 Palaeolithic type localities in the Southern Urals region. Most of these are located in karst cavities in the mountain area. In the flat part of the country, Palaeolithic type localities are extremely rare and are situated in the deposits of the second river terraces. Results of biostratigraphical investigations of the main localities are given in this short review. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA. All rights reserved

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