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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That perched ground water is ground water separated from an underlying body of ground water by an unsaturated zone [6]. see also ground water, perched.?

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KarstBase a bibliography database in karst and cave science.

Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for japan (Keyword) returned 43 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 16 to 30 of 43
Die Tierwelt der Sinterhhlen im Okutama-Tal bei Tokio (Japan)., 1965, Torii, H. S.
[Japan]

Die Lavahhlen am Fue des Fudschijama (Japan) und deren Tierwelt, 1965, Torii, H. S.

Die Tierwelt der Sinterhhlen im Okutama-Tal bei Tokio (Japan), 1965, Torii, H. S.

Faunen einiger Kstenhhlen auf der Miura-Halbinsel (Japan)., 1966, Torii, H. S.
[Japan]

Faunen einiger Kstenhhlen auf der Miura-Halbinsel (Japan), 1966, Torii, H. S.

Die Tierwelt einiger knstlicher Hohlrume in den Prfekturen Kanagawa und Shizuoka (Japan)., 1970, Torii, H. S.
[Japan]

Die Tierwelt einiger knstlicher Hohlrume in den Prfekturen Kanagawa und Shizuoka (Japan), 1970, Torii, H. S.

A new cave amphipod Crustacea from Japan., 1971, Ueno Masuzo
A new eyeless Amphipod Crustacea 5 mm long was found in Himis-d Cave in Tokushima Prefecture, Shikoku. The inner ramus of its third uropod is nearly as long as the unijointed outer ramus. The accessory flagellum of the first antenna consists only of a single joint. The first maxilla is distinctive in its small palp which does not extend beyond the apical margin of the outer plate and bears only an apical seta. In these characteristic features the present form is different from any known species of the genera of the Crangonyx and Hadzia groups and seems to belong to a new species, on the basis of which the new genus Awacaris is created.

A new cave amphipod Crustacea from Japan., 1971, Ueno Masuzo
A new eyeless Amphipod Crustacea 5 mm long was found in Himis-d Cave in Tokushima Prefecture, Shikoku. The inner ramus of its third uropod is nearly as long as the unijointed outer ramus. The accessory flagellum of the first antenna consists only of a single joint. The first maxilla is distinctive in its small palp which does not extend beyond the apical margin of the outer plate and bears only an apical seta. In these characteristic features the present form is different from any known species of the genera of the Crangonyx and Hadzia groups and seems to belong to a new species, on the basis of which the new genus Awacaris is created.

An introduction to Japanese groundwater animals with reference to their ecology and hygienic significance., 1976, Matsumoto Koichi
1) Nearly two hundred species of troglobites are known from the groundwaters of Japan. Most of these troglobiontic species, sixteen of seventy-seven genera, and what is more, four of fortyseven families are endemic to Japan. Uchidastygacaridae, Nipponacaridae, and Kantacaridae are endemic acaridan families of Japan. The coleopterous family, Phreatodytidae, is alto endemic to Japan. 2) Though studies on Protozoa, Turbellaria, Annelida, Aschelminthes, and Ostracoda, etc. remain sparse, the interstitial fauna is actively investigated recently and many specimens of Bathynellacea, Ingolfiella, Bogidiella, Microcerberus, Pseudovermis (Opisthobranchia), and Nerillidae, etc. have been collected from freshwater and marine environments. 3) None of the troglobites is known to be directly detrimental to human health and most of them have been collected from well-waters which are regarded as chemically clean in many cases, but they have also been obtained occasionally from bacteriologically contaminated well-waters. 4) Ecological and taxonomic knowledge, of even the limited amount which we possess at present, has enabled us to utilize various animals which occur in well-waters as biological indicators of well-water pollution and to have some insight as to the origin of the pollution.

Identification of the origin of oreforming solutions by the use of stable isotopes, 1977, Sheppard S. M. F. ,
SynopsisThe four major different types of water -- magmatic, metamorphic, sea water and/or connate, and meteoric water -- have characteristic hydrogen (D/H) and oxygen (18O/16O) isotope ratios. Applied to the analysis of isotopic data on hydrothermal minerals, fluid inclusions and waters from active geothermal systems, these ratios indicate that waters of several origins are involved with ore deposition in the volcanic and epizonal intrusive environment. Water of a single origin dominates main-stage mineralization in some deposits: magmatic -- Casapalca, Peru (Ag-Pb-Zn-Cu); meteoric -- Butte, Montana (Cu-Zn-Mn), epithermal deposits, e.g. Goldfield, Tonopah, Nevada (Ag-Au), Pachuca, Mexico (Ag-Au), San Juan Mountains District, Colorado (Ag-Au-Pb-Zn); sea water -- Troodos, Cyprus (Fe-Cu), Kuroko, Japan (Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn). Solutions of more than one origin are important in certain deposits (magmatic and meteoric -- porphyry copper and molybdenum deposits) and are present in many. In the porphyry Cu-Mo deposits the initial major ore transportation and alteration processes (K-feldspar-biotite alteration) are magmatic-hydrothermal events that occur at 750-500{degrees}C. These fluids are typically highly saline Na-K-Ca-Cl-rich brines (more than 15 wt % equivalent NaCl). The convecting meteoric-hydrothermal system that develops in the surrounding country rocks with relatively low integrated water/rock ratios (less than 0.5 atom % oxygen) subsequently collapses in on a waning magmatic-hydrothermal system at about 350-200{degrees}C. These fluids generally have moderate to low salinities (less than 15 wt % equivalent NaCl). Differences among these deposits are probably in part related to variations in the relative importance of the meteoric-hydrothermal versus the magmatic-hydrothermal events. The sulphur comes from the intrusion and possibly also from the country rocks. Deposits in which meteoric or sea water is the dominant constituent of the hydrothermal fluids come from epizonal intrusive and sub-oceanic environments where the volcanic country rocks are fractured or well jointed and highly permeable. Integrated water/rock ratios are typically high, with minimum values of 0.5 or higher (atom % oxygen) -- the magmatic water contribution is often drowned out'. Salinities are low to very low (less than 10 wt % equivalent NaCl), and temperatures are usually in the range 350-150{degrees}C. The intrusion supplies the energy to drive the large-scale convective circulation system. The sulphur comes from the intrusion, the country rocks and/or the sea water. Argillic alteration, which occurs to depths of several hundred metres, generated during supergene weathering in many of these deposits is isotopically distinguishable from hydrothermal clays

On the Wad-Minerals from the Cavern Environment., 1983, Kashima Naruhiko
The wad-minerals from limestone caves of Yugoslavia, China and Japan were studied. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed five minerals; birnessite, 10A-manganite, pyrolusite, todorokite and goethite. The heavy metal elements, Mn, Zn, Fe and Cr have been detected by X-ray fluorescence analysis and their contents were roughly determined. The condensation water introduced directly from the covering soils formed by the continental weathering and the deriving corrosive water interaction with limestone could be the input sources of manganese and other metal elements into the system.

Diatom, contributors of coralloid speleothems, from Togawa-Sakaidani-Do cave in Miyazaki Prefecture, Central Kyushu, Japan, 1987, Irie Teruo, Kashima Naruhiko, Kinoshita Nobuhiro
Coralloid speleothems are commonly distributed in Togawa-Sakaidani-do Cave in Miyazaki Prefecture, Central Kyushu, but their speleological study has not heretofore been achieved. Light and scanning microscopes analyses revealed that coralloid speleothems consist of alternating layers of diatom colonies, detrital minerals and clay. Electron microprobe analysis shows coralloid speleothems to be silicious. This paper asserts that diatom (genus Melosira) is one of the important contributors to siliceous coralloid speleothems in the threshold zone at non-calcareous caves.

A new Jujiroa from Sichuan, China (Coleoptera, Carabidae), 1994, Taglianti Augusto Vigna
Jujiroa iolandae n.sp. is described from Liujia Cave in China (Sichuan, near Huaying, between Chongqing and Nanchong). Strongly depigmented, with very reduced eyes and markedly elongated appendages, it is well distinguishable from Taiwanese and Japanese species, and from the two previously known species from China. One of these, J. suensoni from Shangxi, is quite different (its doubtful taxonomic position is perhaps to be referred to another genus or lineage); the other, J. rufescens from Jiangxi (Fujian), is more related to the new species, that differs by the longer and more sinuate pronotum, with fore and hind angles much more produced, by the presence of basal pore and the absence of first dorsal seta on elytra, and by the apical tooth acute, long and spine-like. The new species extends well westwards the range of the genus, hitherto extending from southeastern Japan (five described species from Honshu, Shikoku, Kyushu), to Taiwan (seven species) and, in front, to Chinese Fujian.

Kannosui Spring and endokarstification of the Hokezu mountains, Western Shikoku, Japan, 1995, Kashima Naruhiko

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