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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology


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Community news

Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That finite difference method is a numerical method used to approximate the solution of partial differential equations [16].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms


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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
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Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for flows (Keyword) returned 315 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 286 to 300 of 315
Hydrogeology of gypsum Formations in Iran, 2013,
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Raeisi E. , Zare M. , Aghdam J. A.

The gypsum formations in Iran are mainly Upper Red (URF), Gachsaran (GF), and Sachun. The GF is divided into salt (SGF) and its non-salt equivalents (NSGF). The conductivity of the spring’s water in Sachun, URF and NSGF is below 3500 mS cm21, but the conductivity of the SGF varies from 2400 to 400,000 mS cm21. Three different sites, Tangsorkh (NSGF), Ambal and Salbiz (SGF), were selected for further studies. The Tangsorkh area is composed of alternating units of marlstone and gypsum. The hydraulic connections between these units are broken by the marls and no sub-aquifer is developed in the gypsum units due to their small catchment area and lack of karst development. The Ambal area, adjacent to the large Karun River, consists of units of marl, anhydrite, and halite. Sinkholes cover all parts of the area. Contact of Karun River with the Amble ridge causes the chemistry of the river to evolve from bicarbonate type to chloride type. The presence of the Karun River inside this ridge formed a network of karstic conduits and sinkholes, which causes the marly layers to collapse such that the Ambal area cannot be considered to have several independent subaquifers. The Salbiz site is composed of alternating units of marl-marlstone and gypsum without any sinkholes or exposed salt layers. It consists of independent sub-aquifers with general flow directions parallel to the strike. The study indicates that the GF is mainly composed of small independent sub-aquifers due to its alternative marl or marlstone layers, resulting water flows parallel to the strike, except in the SGF under specific conditions.


Variances in airflows during different ventilation modes in a dynamic U-shaped cave, 2013,
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Faimon J. , Lang M.

Airflow dynamics were studied in Císařská Cave (Moravian Karst, Czech Republic) under different seasonal conditions. The dependence of airflows on the difference between external and cave temperatures is nonlinear and roughly obeys the Darcy-Weisbach equation. The upward airflows were found to be systematically higher than the downward airflows under comparable driving forces. The principle reason is nonlinearity between air temperature and air density. U-shaped cave geometry magnifies this effect by feedback between external temperature and airflow driving forces. Whereas this feedback is positive during the upward airflow ventilation mode, it is negative during the downward airflow mode. To discuss the behavior in detail, a simplified model based on balancing the masses of two equivalent air columns of different temperatures and densities is proposed. The results contribute to a better understanding of cave microclimate evolution, cave CO2 dynamics, and speleothem growth.


Study of a flowstone type speleothem from the hypogene Palvolgy Cave System (Budapest, Hungary), 2013,
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Virag Magdolna, Mindszenty Andrea, Suranyi Gergely, Molnar Mihaly, LeelŐ, Ssy Szabolcs

Combining 3D geological boundaries and fundamental hydraulic principles (KARSYS) in a GIS procedure to depict flow-systems in a karst region, 2013,
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Jeannin Pierreyves, Malard Arnauld

Combining 3D geological boundaries and fundamental hydraulic principles (KARSYS) in a GIS procedure to depict flow-systems in a karst region, 2013,
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Jeannin Pierreyves, Malard Arnauld

Hydrogeological approach to distinguishing hypogene speleogenesis settings, 2013,
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Klimchouk, A. B.

The hydrogeological approach to defining hypogene speleogenesis (HS) relates it to ascending groundwater flow (AF). HS develops where AF causes local disequilibria conditions favoring dissolution and supports them during sufficiently long time in course of the geodynamic and hydrogeological evolution. The disequilibrium conditions at depth are invoked by changing physical-chemical parameters along an AF paths, or/and by the interaction between circulation systems of different scales and hydrody-namic regimes. The association of HS with AF suggests a possibility to discern regulari-ties of development and distribution of HS from the perspectives of the regional hy-drogeological analysis. In mature artesian basins of the cratonic type, settings favorable for AF and HS, are as follows: 1) marginal areas of discharge of the groundwaters of the 2nd hydrogeological story (H-story), 2) zones of topography-controlled upward cir-culation within the internal basin area (at the 1st and, in places, at the 2nd H-stories; 3) crests of anticlinal folds or uplifted tectonic blocs within the internal basin area where the upper regional aquitard is thinned or partially breached; 4) linear-local zones of deep-rooted cross-formational faults conducting AF from internal deep sources across the upper H-stories. Hydrodynamics in the 3rd and 4th stories is dominated by ascending circulation strongly controlled by cross-formational tectonic structures. Specific circula-tion pattern develops in large Cenozoic carbonate platforms (the Florida-type), side-open to the ocean, where AF across stratified sequences in the coastal parts, driven by both topography-induced head gradients and density gradients, involves mixing with the seawater. The latter can be drawn into a platform at deep levels and rise in the plat-form interior (the Kohout’s scheme). In folded regions, AF and HS are tightly con-trolled by faults, especially those at junctions between large tectonic structures. In young intramontaine basins with dominating geostatic regime, HS is favored at margin-al discharge areas where circulation systems of different origins and regimes may inter-act, such as meteoric waters flows from adjacent uplifted massifs, basinal fluids expelled from the basin’s interiors, and endogenous fluids rising along deep-rooted faults. Spe-cific and very favorable settings for HS are found in regions of young volcanism with carbonate formations in a sedimentary cover


Study of a flowstone type speleothem from the hypogene Plvlgy Cave System (Budapest, Hungary), 2013,
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Virg M. , Mindszenty A. , Surnyi G. , Molnr M. , LelŐ, Ssy S.

TRITIUM AND H, O AND C STABLE ISOTOPES AS A TOOL FOR TRACKING OF WATER CIRCULATION IN THE NIEDŹWIEDZIA CAVE SYSTEM (SUDETES, POLAND), 2013,
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Gą, Siorowski M. Hercman H.

 

Water circulation in Niedźwiedzia Cave system is complicated. The system is fed by direct infiltration of precipitation, infiltration from the surface stream and, possibly, by rising flow from deep sources. The cave is drained by system of karst springs in the Kleśnica stream valley, but some part of water flows across border ridge and occurs in Morava stream valley, Czech Republic (Ciężkowski et al. 2009). We tried to use tritium and stable isotopes to describe hydrology of the cave system and analyzed 155 water samples for stable isotopes and 38 water samples for tritium content. The Niedźwiedzia Cave system is composed of three levels of halls and galleries. In the upper level, stable isotope composition in drip water plots close to the local meteoritic water line (LMWL) on the δ18O vs δD diagram. It varies during the year similar to stable isotope composition of precipitation (i.e. low δ18O values during winters and higher δ18O during summers). The delay between isotopic signal in precipitation and drip water is ~10–14 days and this can be interpreted as a time of infiltration from the surface to the cave upper level. The correlation between isotopic composition of precipitation and drip water is not observed in the lower level of the cave system. There isotopic composition of drip water is more stable during the year. We use tritium dating method to estimate the age of this water. It has shown that infiltration time to the lower level is 1.4±0.3 year. The “oldest” water was found in karst spring draining the cave system. The estimated transit time is 3–4 years and suggest admixture of some “old” water that was not sampled in the cave.


VALLEY INCISION IN THE NÍZKE TATRY MTS. (SLOVAKIA) ESTIMATED BASED ON PALEOMAGNETIC AND RADIOMETRIC CAVE SEDIMENT DATINGS, 2013,
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Kadlec J. Bella P. Č, í, ž, Ková, K. Granger D. E. Hercman H. Holú, Bek P. Chadima M. Orvoš, Ová, M. Pruner P. Schnabl P. Š, Lechta S.

 

Up to eleven horizontal cave levels occur at different altitudes in Jánska, Demänovská and Mošnická karst valleys in the Nízke Tatry Mts. Most of the caves are filled with allochthonous sediments transported from the area formed mostly by granite. The cave levels were filled with fluvial sediments in dependence on the valleys incision caused by Neogene and Pleistocene uplift of the mountain range. The fluvial sediments are intercalated with, or capped, by flowstone layers in the caves. The paleomagnetic polarities measured both in clastic and chemogenic sediments indicate the age of deposition. Based on obtained polarity data we are able to distinguish cave sediments deposited during the Brunhes, Matuyama and Gauss chrons. The paleomagnetic interpretation was partly verified by U-series datings of flowstones preserved in the sedimentary sections. Except for the horizontal cave levels located in the karst valleys, additional large cave systems were found at extremely high altitudes in the Nízke Tatry Mts. 600–700 m above the lowest horizontal cave level.


Karst rivers particularity: an example from Dinaric karst (Croatia/Bosnia and Herzegovina), 2013,
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Bonacci O. , Zeljkovic I. , Galic A.

The very complex system of sinking, losing and underground transboundary Karst rivers, lakes and aquifers in the central part of the deep and bare Dinaric karst in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina is analysed. The groundwater and surface water are hydraulically connected through numerous karst forms which facilitate the exchange of water between the surface and subsurface. A complex underground conduit system is an inherent characteristic karst system analysed. Groundwater and surface water exchange with both adjacent and distant aquifers through underground routes or inflows from surface streams and artificial reservoirs. Because of a complex surface and underground karst features, which strongly influenced its hydrological and hydrogeological regime, the main open stream flow, with a longitude of about 106 km, undergoes eight name changes. In this paper, it is noted as ‘‘the eight-name river’’. In fact, it represents one river with losing, sinking and underground stream sections. Different surface and underground karst forms play crucial roles in the way the water flowing over the surface and on the underground sections of its catchment. The analysed area is full of varied and often spectacular surface landforms, including for example the Blue and Red Lakes and the Kravice Waterfall. The analyses made in the paper show the existence of a decreasing trend of mean annual discharges on the eight-name river, which can cause numerous problems in the regional water resource management of this transboundary river and catchment.


Karst rivers particularity: an example from Dinaric karst (Croatia/Bosnia and Herzegovina), 2013,
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Bonacci Ognjen, Ž, Eljković, Ivana, Galić, Amira

The very complex system of sinking, losing and underground transboundary Karst rivers, lakes and aquifers in the central part of the deep and bare Dinaric karst in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina is analysed. The groundwater and surface water are hydraulically connected through numerous karst forms which facilitate the exchange of water between the surface and subsurface. A complex underground conduit system is an inherent characteristic karst system analysed. Groundwater and surface water exchange with both adjacent and distant aquifers through underground routes or inflows from surface streams and artificial reservoirs. Because of a complex surface and underground karst features, which strongly influenced its hydrological and hydrogeological regime, the main open stream flow, with a longitude of about 106 km, undergoes eight name changes. In this paper, it is noted as ‘‘the eight-name river’’. In fact, it represents one river with losing, sinking and underground stream sections. Different surface and underground karst forms play crucial roles in the way the water flowing over the surface and on the underground sections of its catchment. The analysed area is full of varied and often spectacular surface landforms, including for example the Blue and Red Lakes and the Kravice Waterfall. The analyses made in the paper show the existence of a decreasing trend of mean annual discharges on the eight-name river, which can cause numerous problems in the regional water resource management of this transboundary river and catchment.


THE SAN PAOLO MINE TUNNEL AT SA DUCHESSA (DOMUSNOVAS, SW SARDINIA): TEN INTERCEPTED NATURAL CAVES AND FIRST DATA ON THE COMPOSITION OF SOME SPELEOTHEMS , 2013,
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Simone Argiolas, Caddeo Guglielmo Angelo, Casu Lucilla, Muntoni Alberto, Papinuto Silvestro

Since many years cavers from different caving teams are carrying out a systematic study on the caves of Sulcis-Iglesiente, including geomorphological studies. Over thirty natural caves have been explored, surveyed and registered in the past few years, and over half of these have been made accessible by mine galleries. Among these are worth to be mentioned the “Tre Sorelle” of Domusnovas: these are three mine caves intercepted by the San Paolo mine tunnel. This tunnel, whose collapsed entrance has been reopened after a long digging campaign, has been explored and surveyed for around 700 meters. A total of 10 natural caves, mostly developed along fractures, have been explored and mapped, with developments ranging between 10 and 250 meters and depths from 15 to over 160 meters. Only two of these caves were previously known in the Regional Cave Register. In most of the caves, speleothems consist mainly of flowstones, some of which are clear or usually white, others are dark-brown or tending to black. Some samples of the first and the second flowstone types were collected respectively from the “Sesta Sorella” and “Seconda Sorella” Caves. The powders of these samples were analysed by an X-ray diffractometer. The first type consists of thicker layers of white and fibrous aragonite, which sometimes alternate with thinner layers of grey columnar calcite. In some samples, however, calcite interlayers were absent and just aragonite was found. The second type is composed of alternating layers of darkbrown hemimorphite. Some additional analyses were performed on these samples by Laser Ablation ICP-MS to determine the concentration of minor and trace elements in the different layers and mineralogical phases. The most abundant minor elements in calcite layers are Mg and Zn. Magnesium is about constant (~ 2000 ppm) on different spots and remains under the average Mg content of the cave calcite in this region, whereas Zn ranges from 103 to 104 ppm and is well above the Zn average in calcite of caves in the world. Barium concentration is about 80 ppm and more abundant than Pb (20 ppm) and Sr (10 ppm). Barium is also the main minor element in aragonite, where it can reach almost 2000 ppm. The Zn concentration is very high even in aragonite and is comparable to that of Sr (400-500 ppm), overcoming considerably the Pb concentration (20 ppm). In hemimorphite, the most abundant minor elements are Al and Fe (about 104 ppm). However, it was not quantified how much of these are in the hemimorphite lattice or come from some impurities. Actually, we notice that concentration of Fe and Al in the black layers of hemimorphite is an order of magnitude greater than in the brown ones. In addition, the black layers show an abrupt increase of Mn concentration, which overcomes Fe and Al. The evolution of these flowstones is most probably related to the circulation of fluids connected to the oxidation of sulphides, specially sphalerite.


Using hydrogeochemical and ecohydrologic responses to understand epikarst process in semi-arid systems, Edwards plateau, Texas, USA, 2013,
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Schwartz Benjamin F. , Schwinning Susanne, Gerrard Brett, Kukowski Kelly R. , Stinson Chasity L. , Dammeyer Heather C.

The epikarst is a permeable boundary between surface and subsurface environments and can be conceptualized as the vadose critical zone of epigenic karst systems which have not developed under insoluble cover. From a hydrologic perspective, this boundary is often thought of as being permeable in one direction only (down), but connectivity between the flow paths of water through the epikarst and the root systems of woody plants means that water moves both up and down across the epikarst. However, the dynamics of these flows are complex and highly dependent on variability in the spatial structure of the epikarst, vegetation characteristics, as well as temporal variability in precipitation and evaporative demand. Here we summarize insights gained from working at several sites on the Edwards Plateau of Central Texas, combining isotopic, hydrogeochemical, and ecophysiological methodologies. 1) Dense woodland vegetation at sites with thin to absent soils (0-30 cm) is in part supported by water uptake from the epikarst. 2) However, tree transpiration typically becomes water-limited in dry summers, suggesting that the plant-available fraction of stored water in the epikarst depletes quickly, even when sustained cave drip rates indicate that water is still present in the epikarst. 3) Flow paths for water that feeds cave drips become rapidly disconnected from the evaporation zone of the epikarst and out of reach for plant roots. 4) Deep infiltration and recharge does not occur in these systems without heavy or continuous precipitation that exceeds some threshold value. Thresholds are strongly correlated with antecedent potential evapotranspiration and rainfall, suggesting control by the moisture status of the epikarst evapotranspiration zone. The epikarst and unsaturated zone in this region can be conceptualized as a variably saturated system with storage in fractures, matrix porosity, and in shallow perched aquifers, most of which is inaccessible to the root systems of trees, although woody vegetation may control recharge thresholds.


Temporal variability of karst aquifer response time established by the sliding-windows cross-correlation method, 2013,
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Delbarta Célestine, Valdesd Danièle, Barbecotg Florent, Tognellia Antoine, Richona Patrick, Couchouxh Laurent

We study the temporal variability of water transfer through the infiltration zone of a karst aquifer by estimating the impulse response of the system using cross-correlogram analyses between rainfall and piezometric level time series. We apply a sliding-window cross-correlation method, which calculates cross-correlograms on partially superposed short time series windows. We apply this method for rainfall and piezometric level time series at six boreholes in a fractured karstic aquifer located in Burgundy, France. Based on cross-correlogram functions, we obtain a time series of response time. At most of the boreholes, the cross-correlation functions change over time, and the response times vary seasonally, being shorter during the summer. This unusual structure can be partly explained by the seasonal variability in rainfall intensity, which is higher during the summer (May–September), inducing the seasonal behaviour of the epikarst. During the summer, when rainfall intensity is higher, the epikarst is more easily and quickly saturated. This induces an increase in lateral water transfer within the epikarst and an increase in concentrated fast flows. We also show that the response time seems to tend towards a limit which represents the maximum saturation of the epikarst.


MODELING SPELEOGENESIS USING COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS: POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS TO HYPOGENE CAVES, 2014,
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Covington M. , Myre J.

Numerical models of speleogenesis typically simulate flow and dissolution within single fractures or networks of fractures. Such models employ fracture flow and pipe flow equations to determine flow rates and only consider average velocities within each fracture segment. Such approximations make large scale simulations of speleogenesis tractable. However, they do not allow simulation of the formation and evolution of micro- or meso-scale cave passage morphologies. Such morphologies are frequently studied within a field setting and utilized for the interpretation of the speleogenetic processes that formed the cave. One classic example is the formation of scallops in cave streams with turbulent flow. Scallops are used to interpret past flow velocities and directions. However, a recent analysis of the theory of limestone dissolution in turbulent flow conditions suggests a discrepancy between theory and reality concerning the formation of limestone scallops (Covington, in review). Similarly, the only attempt to numerically simulate flute formation in limestone found that the flute forms were not stable (Hammer et al., 2011). Motivated by these puzzles, we are developing a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework for the simulation of the evolution of dissolution morphologies.

While this project was initially conceived to better understand dissolution in turbulent flow, the tools being developed are particu­larly well-suited to examine a variety of other questions related to cave morphology on the micro- and meso-scales. There has been significant recent discussion about the interpretation of features that are diagnostic of hypogenic or transverse speleogenesis, such as the morphological suite of rising flow defined by Klimchouk (2007). Other authors have suggested that such forms can be found in a variety of settings where confined flow is not present (Mylroie and Mylroie, 2009; Palmer, 2011). We propose that simulation of such forms using a CFD speleogenesis code will allow a more complete understanding of the connections between process and form, because in such simulations the processes occurring are well-known, well-defined, and also can be adjusted within controlled numeri­cal experiments, where relevant parameters and boundary conditions are systematically varied.

The CFD framework we are developing is based on the Lattice Boltzman method (Chen and Doolen, 1998), which is a popular tech­nique for modeling the mechanics of complex fluids, including fluid mixtures, reactive transport, porous media flow, and complex and evolving domain geometries. With this framework it is straightforward to simulate many of the processes occurring in hypogene settings, including complex fluid flows, dissolution, solute and heat transport, and buoyancy-driven flow. Furthermore, this modeling framework allows these processes to be coupled so that their interactions and feedbacks can be explored. With the suite of capabili­ties provided by this framework, we can begin to numerically simulate the processes occurring in hypogene speleogenesis, including the driving mechanisms and the role of buoyancy-driven flow and its relationship with the morphological suite of rising flow. In the spirit of a workshop, this work is presented as in-progress, in the hopes that it will stimulate discussion on potential applications of the model being developed.


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