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Enviroscan Ukrainian Institute of Speleology and Karstology


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Speleology in Kazakhstan

Shakalov on 04 Jul, 2018
Hello everyone!   I pleased to invite you to the official site of Central Asian Karstic-Speleological commission ("Kaspeko")   There, we regularly publish reports about our expeditions, articles and reports on speleotopics, lecture course for instructors, photos etc. ...

New publications on hypogene speleogenesis

Klimchouk on 26 Mar, 2012
Dear Colleagues, This is to draw your attention to several recent publications added to KarstBase, relevant to hypogenic karst/speleogenesis: Corrosion of limestone tablets in sulfidic ground-water: measurements and speleogenetic implications Galdenzi,

The deepest terrestrial animal

Klimchouk on 23 Feb, 2012
A recent publication of Spanish researchers describes the biology of Krubera Cave, including the deepest terrestrial animal ever found: Jordana, Rafael; Baquero, Enrique; Reboleira, Sofía and Sendra, Alberto. ...

Caves - landscapes without light

akop on 05 Feb, 2012
Exhibition dedicated to caves is taking place in the Vienna Natural History Museum   The exhibition at the Natural History Museum presents the surprising variety of caves and cave formations such as stalactites and various crystals. ...

Did you know?

That thrust; thrust fault is a generally gently dipping or subhorizontal fault plane where the relative movement has been essentially horizontal, with one rock sequence being pushed across and above another. some cave development in the traligill area of north-west scotland has been guided by thrust planes [9].?

Checkout all 2699 terms in the KarstBase Glossary of Karst and Cave Terms


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Featured articles from Cave & Karst Science Journals
Chemistry and Karst, White, William B.
See all featured articles
Featured articles from other Geoscience Journals
Karst environment, Culver D.C.
Mushroom Speleothems: Stromatolites That Formed in the Absence of Phototrophs, Bontognali, Tomaso R.R.; D’Angeli Ilenia M.; Tisato, Nicola; Vasconcelos, Crisogono; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Gonzales, Esteban R. G.; De Waele, Jo
Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations, Rowberry, Matt; Marti, Xavi; Frontera, Carlos; Van De Wiel, Marco; Briestensky, Milos
Microbial mediation of complex subterranean mineral structures, Tirato, Nicola; Torriano, Stefano F.F;, Monteux, Sylvain; Sauro, Francesco; De Waele, Jo; Lavagna, Maria Luisa; D’Angeli, Ilenia Maria; Chailloux, Daniel; Renda, Michel; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Bontognali, Tomaso Renzo Rezio
Evidence of a plate-wide tectonic pressure pulse provided by extensometric monitoring in the Balkan Mountains (Bulgaria), Briestensky, Milos; Rowberry, Matt; Stemberk, Josef; Stefanov, Petar; Vozar, Jozef; Sebela, Stanka; Petro, Lubomir; Bella, Pavel; Gaal, Ludovit; Ormukov, Cholponbek;
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Your search for recession (Keyword) returned 80 results for the whole karstbase:
Showing 46 to 60 of 80
Propagation of a floodwave in karst during artificially generated recession - case study of Banjica spring (Bela Palanka, Eastern Serbia), 2003,
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Zlokolicamandić, Milena, Jalić, Ljubojević, Jelena

During hydrogeological research in the area of the north-eastern foothills of Mt. Suva Planina in Eastern Serbia, a borehole of 100 m of depth was drilled in the vicinity of a lukewarm spring, Banjica. The borehole had an artesian discharge, which caused artificially generated recession in the adjoining spring Banjica. During this hydrodynamical test, great quantities of precipitation occured in the hinterland of the spring, having the effect of a floodwave. The presence of two types of karst is obvious in the field - confined karst and covered karst. The hydrogeological response to the floodwave during artificially generated recession proved the presence of deep-seated karst also. This can be detected by comparative analysis of the hydrograph of the Banjica spring and the graph of pressures in the borehole. In this way, not only the presence, but also the characteristics of the karst can be proved (e.g. dimensions and types of karst conduits, relative age of karst, size and extension of the aquifer, etc.).


Influence of solar luminosity over geomagnetic and climatic cycles as derived from speleothems, 2004,
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Ford Derek Clifford, Georgiev Leonid, Georgieva Desislava, Sanabria Michael, Shopov Yavor, Stoykova Diana, Tsankov Ludmil
We observed cycles presented in a luminescent solar insolation proxy record from a speleothem from Jewel Cave, South Dakota, US. We found cycles of orbital precession with periods of 23 and 19 ka and of obliquity of 41 ka and many others from non- orbital origin in this sample. We determined the Solar origin of the cycles with durations of 11500, 4400, 3950, 2770, 2500, 2090, 1960, 1670, 1460, 1280, 1195, 1145, 1034, 935, 835, 750 and 610 years. It was done by their detection both in proxy records of speleothem luminescence, D14C and the intensity of the geomagnetic dipole. It is well known that the main variations in the last two records are produced by the solar wind. The most intensive cycle discovered in this record has duration of 11.5 ka. It is not of orbital origin. It was found previously to be the most intensive cycle in the D14C calibration record and has been interpreted to be of terrestrial origin because "it is too strong to be of solar origin". Our studies suggest that it should be a solar cycle modulating the geomagnetic field and 14C reversed production as the other solar cycles do.

Storm pulse chemographs of saturation index and carbon dioxide pressure: implications for shifting recharge sources during storm events in the karst aquifer at Fort Campbell, Kentucky/Tennessee, USA, 2004,
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Vesper D. J. , White W. B. ,
Continuous records of discharge, specific conductance, and temperature were collected through a series of storm pulses on two limestone springs at Fort Campbell, western Kentucky/Tennessee, USA. Water samples, collected at short time intervals across the same storm pulses, were analyzed for calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, total organic carbon, and pH. Chemographs of calcium, calcite saturation index, and carbon dioxide partial pressure were superimposed on the storm hydrographs. Calcium concentration and specific conductance track together and dip to a minimum either coincident with the peak of the hydrograph or lag slightly behind it. The CO2 pressure continues to rise on the recession limb of the hydrograph and, as a result, the saturation index decreases on the recession limb of the hydrograph. These results are interpreted as being due to dispersed infiltration through CO2-rich soils lagging the arrival of quick-flow from sinkhole recharge in the transport of storm flow to the springs. Karst spring hydrographs reflect not only the changing mix of base flow and storm flow but also a shift in source of recharge water over the course of the storm

Spatial and temporal variability of water salinity in an ephemeral, arid-zone river, central Australia, 2005,
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Costelloe Jf, Grayson Rb, Mcmahon Ta, Argent Rm,
This study describes the spatial and temporal variability of water salinity of the Neales-Peake, an ephemeral river system in the arid Lake Eyre basin of central Australia. Saline to hypersaline waterholes occur in the lower reaches of the Neales-Peake catchment and lie downstream of subcatchments containing artesian mound springs. Flood pulses are fresh in the upper reaches of the rivers (< 200 mg 1(-1)). In the salt-affected reaches, flood pulses become increasingly saline during their recession. It is hypothesized that leakage from the Great Artesian Basin deposits salt at the surface. This salt is then transported by infrequent runoff events into the main river system over long periods of time. The bank/floodplain store downstream of salt-affected catchments contains high salt concentrations, and this salt is mobilized during the flow recession when bank/floodplain storage discharges into the channel. The salinity of the recession increases as the percentage of flow derived from this storage increases. A simple conceptual model was developed for investigating the salt movement processes during flow events. The model structure for transport of water and salt in the Neales-Peake catchment generated similar spatial and temporal patterns of salt distribution in the floodplain/bank storage and water flow as observed during flow events in 2000-02. However, more field-data collection and modelling are required for improved calibration and description of salt transport and storage processes, particularly with regard to the number of stores required to represent the salt distribution in the upper zone of the soil profile. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

A quantitative method for the characterisation of karst aquifers based on spring hydrograph analysis, 2005,
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Kovacs A. , Perrochet P. , Kiraly L. , Jeannin P. Y. ,
This paper presents a method for characterizing flow systems in karst aquifers by acquiring quantitative information about the geometric and hydraulic aquifer parameters from spring hydrograph analysis. Numerical sensitivity analyses identified two fundamentally different flow domains, depending on the overall configuration of aquifer parameters. These two domains have been quantitatively characterized by deducing analytical solutions for the global hydraulic response of simple two-dimensional model geometries. During the baseflow recession of mature karst systems, the hydraulic parameters of karst conduits do not influence the drainage of the low-permeability matrix. In this case the drainage process is influenced by the size and hydraulic parameters of the low-permeability blocks alone. This flow condition has been defined as matrix-restrained flow regime (MRFR). During the baseflow recession of early karst systems and fissured systems, as well as the flood recession of mature systems, the recession process depends on the hydraulic parameters and the size of the low-permeability blocks, conduit conductivity and the total extent of the aquifer. This flow condition has been defined as conduit-influenced flow regime (CIFR). Analytical formulae demonstrated the limitations of equivalent models. While equivalent discrete-continuum models of early karst systems may reflect their real hydraulic response, there is only one adequate parameter configuration for mature systems that yields appropriate recession coefficient. Consequently, equivalent discrete-continuum models are inadequate for simulating global response of mature karst systems. The recession coefficient of equivalent porous medium models corresponds to the transition between matrix-restrained and conduit-influenced flow. Consequently, equivalent porous medium models yield corrupted hydrographs both in mature and early systems, and this approach is basically inadequate for modelling global response of karst aquifers. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

Escherichia coli survival in mantled karst springs and streams, northwest Arkansas Ozarks, USA, 2005,
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Davis Rk, Hamilton S, Van Brahana J,
Recent studies indicate fecal coliform bacterial concentrations, including Escherichia coli (E. coli), characteristically vary by several orders of magnitude, depending on the hydrology of storm recharge and discharge. E. coli concentrations in spring water increase rapidly during the rising limb of a storm hydrograph, peak prior to or coincident with the peak of the storm pulse, and decline rapidly, well before the recession of the storm hydrograph. This suggests E. coli are associated with resuspension of sediment during the onset of turbulent flow, and indicates viable bacteria reside within the spring and stream sediments. E. coli inoculated chambers were placed in spring and stream environments within the mantled karst of northwest Arkansas to assess long term (> 75 days) E. coli viability. During the 75-day study, a 4-log die-off of E. coli was observed for chambers placed in the Illinois River, and a 5-log die-off for chambers placed in Copperhead Spring. Extrapolation of the regression line for each environment indicates E. coli concentration would reach 1 most probable number (MPN)/100 g sediment at Copperhead Spring in about 105 days, and about 135 days in the Illinois River, based on a starting inoculation of 2.5 x 107 MPN E. coli/100 g of sediment. These in situ observations indicate it is possible for E. coli to survive in these environments for at least four months with no fresh external inputs

The Messinian salinity crisis: Looking for a new paradigm?, 2006,
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Roveri M. , Manzi V. ,
The importance of the sedimentary record of Messinian events in the Apennines foredeep is due to its geological and structural settings, which allow the reconstruction of the relationships between marginal and basinal settings and provide fundamental insights into some important issues. A geologic-stratigraphic model of the Messinian Apennine foredeep indicating a possible solution for closing the last `Messinian gap' is here presented. Moreover, the establishment of a preliminary high-resolution stratigraphy for the terminal Lago Mare stage allows us to attempt Mediterranean-scale correlations across different structural settings.The Messinian evolution of the Apennine foredeep and some considerations of adjacent areas suggest the great importance of tectonic deformation in controlling Messinian events. The intra-Messinian unconformity is a common feature of the marginal basins of the Mediterranean, and it is associated in many cases to the collapse and resedimentation of primary evaporites. The genesis of such unconformity seems to be strictly related to a general tectonic reorganization of the Mediterranean area. Preliminary observation on the stratigraphy of the Lago Mare stage suggest that the high-frequency lithological cyclicity observed in the non-marine deposits of this stage, as well as the superimposed transgressive trend, are common to many Mediterranean basins. These characteristic features might reflect the interplay between a longer-term tectonic trend and higher-frequency, precession-related, climatic changes; this could represent a fundamental tool for establishing a high-resolution stratigraphic framework of the latest Messinian allowing long-distance correlations between terrestrial and marine ecosystems and hence more accurate palaeoenvironmental studies

Acadian biospeleology: composition and ecology of cave fauna of Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick, Canada., 2007,
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Moseley Max
The vertebrate and invertebrate fauna, environment and habitats of caves and disused mines in Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick are provisionally catalogued and described, based on field collections made over many years. The area was glaciated and the subterranean fauna consists of non-troglobites all of which have arrived and colonised the caves during or following final recession of the Pleistocene glaciers. The statistical composition of the fauna at the higher taxonomic level is similar to that in Ontario, but is less species rich and there are some notable ecological and other differences. Porcupine dung accumulations are an important habitat in the region, constituting a cold-temperate analogue of the diverse guano habitats of southern and tropical caves. Parietal assemblages are, as in other cold temperate regions, an important component of the invertebrate fauna but here include species derived directly from dung communities: another parallel with tropical guano caves. An unanticipated finding is the number of non-indigenous species now utilising local caves. These appear to have colonised unfilled ecological niches, suggesting that post-glacial recolonisation of the subterranean habitat in Nova Scotia has been relatively delayed. Finally the general and regional significance of the subterranean fauna is briefly discussed.

Acadian biospeleology: composition and ecology of cave fauna of Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick, Canada., 2007,
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Moseley Max
The vertebrate and invertebrate fauna, environment and habitats of caves and disused mines in Nova Scotia and southern New Brunswick are provisionally catalogued and described, based on field collections made over many years. The area was glaciated and the subterranean fauna consists of non-troglobites all of which have arrived and colonised the caves during or following final recession of the Pleistocene glaciers. The statistical composition of the fauna at the higher taxonomic level is similar to that in Ontario, but is less species rich and there are some notable ecological and other differences. Porcupine dung accumulations are an important habitat in the region, constituting a cold-temperate analogue of the diverse guano habitats of southern and tropical caves. Parietal assemblages are, as in other cold temperate regions, an important component of the invertebrate fauna but here include species derived directly from dung communities: another parallel with tropical guano caves. An unanticipated finding is the number of non-indigenous species now utilising local caves. These appear to have colonised unfilled ecological niches, suggesting that post-glacial recolonisation of the subterranean habitat in Nova Scotia has been relatively delayed. Finally the general and regional significance of the subterranean fauna is briefly discussed.

Modelling of the functioning of karst aquifers with a reservoir model: Application to Fontaine de Vaucluse (South of France), 2007,
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Fleury Perrine Plagnes Valé, Rie Bakalowicz Michel
This work deals with a rainfall-discharge model applied to a well known karst aquifer. A new approach is developed in order to minimize the fitting parameters: here, some of the model parameters do not result from a simple fitting, as it was the case with earlier models, i.e., some of them were assessed from the hydrograph analysis. The conceptual model of the functioning is based on a production function based on a simple calculation of effective rainfall and a transfer function consisting of two reservoirs. A slow discharge reservoir transfers the low flow and a rapid discharge reservoir feeds the high flow. The model has three fitted parameters plus one for its initialisation. Three parameters are deduced from the hydrograph analysis over the entire time series. For example, the recession coefficient of the slow discharge reservoir is determined from the hydrodynamic analysis of the recession [Mangin, A., 1975. Contribution à l?étude hydrodynamique des aquifères karstiques. 3ème partie. Constitution et fonctionnement des aquifères karstiques. Annales de Spéléologie, 30 (1), 210?124]. This model was tested over a ten years period on the Fontaine de Vaucluse French karst system. The first hydrological year is used for fitting the model; the nine other cycles validate the modelling. The good quality of the model is proved by the Nash criterion of 92.3% on the validation period. Moreover, the simulation results were validated by a statistical analysis of measured and simulated time series. The model successfully simulates both the high and low flow at the same time. Also it estimates the water volumes available in the different parts of the aquifer and it proposes a management tool capable of predicting the evolution of the discharge in different climate conditions.

GROUNDWATER VULNERABILITY OF THE KARST - FISSURE HYDROGEOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF SOUTH -FACING SLOPES OF THE NIZKE TATRY MTS., SLOVAKIA, 2007,
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KovÃ, Č, OvÃ, E. , MalÃ, K P.

An “intrinsic vulnerability” (according to Zwahlen et al., 2004) to any contamination in general is considered using Malík´s extension (2005) of the Kullman´s method (2000), based on the assessment of the degree the rock disruption and karstifica­tion, affecting the shape of spring discharge recession curves. It is based on the presumption that the intensity of natural con­tamination attenuation processes depends on rock disruption/karstification. The method is applied on the Mesozoic rock en­vironment of the most important hydrogeological structure in the southern slopes of the Nízke Tatry Mountains. Hydrograph analyses of groundwater depletion in the gauged or exploited springs were used for assessment of groundwater vulnerability to human and/or natural pollution. Differences in character of individual depletion hydrographs enable assessment an extent of absorption and elimination processes during the groundwa­ter penetration through the rock environment from the infiltra­tion area to the outflow in the spring or exploited source. The depletion hydrographs reflect not only the character (effect) of outflow area but reflect the effects whole infiltration and accu­mulation area. In total, 68 individual recession curves from 9 gauged springs were analysed. Obtained degrees of groundwater vulnerability are evaluated by 10 degree range of the Kullman´s vulnerability scheme, adjusted by Malík. The reached vulner­ability values are consequently applied and assigned to the lith­ological types of discharge area of gauged springs. This study also describes an existence of individual laminar and turbulent sub-regimes that occur in the karts-fissure rock environment, the type of rock disruption from open micro– to macro fissures - to karst channels and subsequent estimation of the karstifica­tion degree.


Ground-water storage calculation in karst aquifers with alluvium or no-flow boundaries, 2008,
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Raeisi E.
The determination of water-budget parameters, such as change in storage and subsurface inflow and outflow, is costly and unreliable due to heterogeneities of karst aquifers. Some karst aquifers may have one or a combination of boundaries such as impermeable formations, alluvial aquifers, and known ground-water divides. Karst water only discharges through springs or flows to the adjacent alluvium. A new procedure is proposed to estimate volume of storage in region during the dry season in these settings. The subsurface inflow and outflow can be measured in the adjacent alluvium using equipotential and flow lines, cross-sectional area, and transmissivity of the alluvial aquifer. The dry season makes it possible to calculate the karst spring recession coefficient and karst aquifer dynamic volume at the beginning and end of the hydrological year. The change of storage is the difference between the dynamic volumes of the karst aquifer at the beginning and end of the hydrological year. The volume of water which flows to the adjacent alluvium or spring is measured by plotting the discharge as a function of time and estimating the recession coefficient at the beginning (or end) of the hydrological year. Known equations are used to calculate the dynamic volume of springs. A general equation is proposed to calculate the dynamic volume of a karst aquifer when there is a combination of springs, and subsurface inflow and outflow from the karst aquifer. The proposed method is applicable to the Zagros Folded Zone in Iran.

Les rseaux de drainage glaciaires et les milieux karstiques: analogies morphologiques et modlisation hydrologique, 2008,
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Jobard S. , Dzikowski M.
Glacial drainage network and karst environments: morphological comparisons and hydrological modelling. Comparisons between glacial and karst environments are used to propose a methodological transfer in the treatment of hydrological data. The technique employed is based on an analysis of recession curves, where a parameter characterizing the degree of development of the drainage system network is varied. This method has been applied to data from continuous hydro-meteorological monitoring of Baounet glacier (Savoie, France) since 2002. The results show an important increase of the glacial drainage network structure during the ablation season, thereby transferring more and more quickly melt water from the surface of the glacier to the proglacial river. Interannual evolution indicates modulations which correspond to an impact of climate forcing on the glacier.

HYDROLOGIC CONNECTIONS AND DYNAMICS OF WATER MOVEMENT IN THE CLASSICAL KARST (KRAS) AQUIFER: EVIDENCE FROM FREQUENT CHEMICAL AND STABLE ISOTOPE SAMPLING, 2008,
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Doctor, D. H.

A review of past research on the hydrogeology of the Classical Karst (Kras) region and new information obtained from a two- year study using environmental tracers are presented in this paper. The main problems addressed are 1) the sources of water to the Kras aquifer resurgence zone—including the famous Timavo springs—under changing flow regimes; 2) a quantification of the storage volumes of the karst massif corresponding to flow regimes defined by hydrograph recessions of the Timavo springs; and 3) changing dynamics between deep phreatic conduit flow and shallow phreatic and epiphreatic storage within the aquifer resurgence zone as determined through changes in chemical and isotopic composition at springs and wells. Particular focus was placed on addressing the long-standing question of the influence of the Soča River on the ground waters of the aquifer resurgence zone. The results indicate that the alluvial aquifer supplied by the sinking of the Soča River on the northwestern edge of the massif contributes approximately 75% of the mean annual outflow to the smaller springs of the aquifer resurgence zone, and as much as 53% to the mean annual outflow of the Timavo springs. As a whole, the Soča River is estimated to contribute 56% of the average outflow of the Kras aquifer resurgence. The proportions of Soča River water increase under drier conditions, and decrease under wetter conditions. Time series analysis of oxygen stable isotope records indicate that the transit time of Soča River water to the Timavo springs, Sardos spring, and well B-4 is on the order of 1-2 months, depending on hydrological conditions. The total baseflow storage of the Timavo springs is estimated to be 518 million m3, and represents 88.5% of the storage capacity estimated for all flow regimes of the springs. The ratio of baseflow storage volume to the average annual volume discharged at the Timavo springs is 0.54. The Reka River sinking in Slovenia supplies substantial allogenic recharge to the aquifer; however, its influence on the northwest resurgence zone is limited to the Timavo springs, and is only a significant component of the spring discharge under flood conditions for relatively brief periods (several days to weeks). Sustainability of the trans-boundary aquifer of the Kras will benefit from maintaining high water quality in the Soča River, as well as focused water tracing experiments within the epiphreatic zone of the aquifer to better delineate the recharge zone and to identify sources of potential contamination to the Brestovica water supply well.


Relationships between cave dimensions and local catchment areas in Central Scandinavia: implications for speleogenesis, 2009,
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Faulkner, Trevor.
The caves formed in the Caledonide metalimestones of Central Scandinavia are identified as occurring in three cave hydrological classes that are randomly intermingled with each other both geographically and altitudinally: relict, mainly vadose (MV) and combination caves. The morphology of the relict caves shows that they were enlarged phreatically. Their dimensions of length, cross-section and volume are unrelated to their local catchment area, whose mean size is only 2.6km2. Indeed, large relict caves may be found near ridge tops, and their mean cross-section to catchment area ratio (XS/CA) is as large as 20.3m2km-2. MV caves contain active stream passages and sumps without significant phreatic upper levels or passages. Although there is no simple relationship between their mean dimensions and their local catchment area, which has a mean size of 4.7km2, their mean XS/CA ratio is only 2.8m2km-2. However, their maximum dimensions are constrained by the logarithm of catchment area. The combination caves contain relict phreatic (and, more rarely, relict vadose) passages that lie above an active vadose streamway and they have mean dimensions significantly larger than those of both relict and MV caves. Their mean CA is 4.6km2 (close to that of the other active cave class) and their mean XS/CA ratio is 11.6m2km-2, which is intermediate between relict caves and MV caves. These observations suggest that the active vadose passages developed during the present conditions of the Holocene, with dimensions related to the flow-rates of present allogenic recharge, as supported by likely entrenchment and waterfall recession rates. In contrast, the relict phreatic passages probably enlarged when the caves were submerged by flowing glacial meltwater that was less related to present catchment area, during a previous deglaciation phase. Most relict caves and the whole set of MV caves seem to have each separately experienced only one phase of cave enlargement after inception, with phreatic development favoured at valley shoulder and ridge cave locations and vadose development favoured at valley floors with large catchments. The larger dimensions and greater complexity of the combination caves indicate that they are more representative of the full range of enlargement opportunities that were available during the evolution of their local topography during one or more full cycles of glaciation, deglaciation and interglaciation.

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